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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1950-1959
 Year: 1957
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Accidents from explosives at metal and nonmetallic mines

Accidents from explosives at metal and nonmetallic mines

Date: 1957
Creator: Cash, Frank E.
Description: Circular produced by the U.S. Bureau of Mines to promote safety through a series of reports on accident prevention in mines. According the the scope statement, "This is the fourth section of the revised series of circulars that cover various phases of accident prevention in metal and nonmetallic mines; it give information on accidents and injuries from storing, handling, and using explosive in metal and nonmetallic mines and discusses the precautions by which they can be prevented" (p. 2).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic characteristics at high speeds of related full-scale propellers having different blade-section cambers

Aerodynamic characteristics at high speeds of related full-scale propellers having different blade-section cambers

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Maynard, Julian D & Salters, Leland B , Jr
Description: Wind-tunnel tests of a full-scale two-blade NACA 10-(10)(08)-03 (high camber) propeller have been made for a range of blade angles from 20 degrees to 55 degrees at airspeeds up to 500 miles per hour. The results of these tests have been compared with results from previous tests of the NACA 10-(3) (08)-03 (low camber) and NACA 10-(5)(08)-03 (medium camber) propellers to evaluate the effects of blade-section camber on propeller aerodynamic characteristics.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 0.04956-Scale Model of the Convair TF-102A Airplane at Transonic Speeds, Coord. No. AF-120

Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 0.04956-Scale Model of the Convair TF-102A Airplane at Transonic Speeds, Coord. No. AF-120

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Osborne, Robert S.
Description: The basic aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair TF-102A airplane with controls undeflected have been determined at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.135 for angles of attack up to approximately 22 deg in the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel. In addition, comparisons have been made with data obtained from a previous investigation of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102A airplane. The results indicated the TF-102A airplane was longitudinally stable for all conditions tested. An increase in lift-curve slope from 0.045 to 0.059 and an 11-percent rearward shift in aerodynamic-center location occurred with increases in Mach number from 0.60 to approximately 1.05. The zero-lift drag coefficient for the TF-102A airplane increased 145 percent between the Mach numbers of 0.85 and 1.075; the maximum lift-drag ratio decreased from 9.5 at a Mach number of 0.60 to 5.0 at Mach numbers above 1.025. There was little difference in the lift and pitching-moment characteristics and drag due to life between the TF-102A and F-102A configurations. However, as compared with the F-102A airplane, the zero-lift drag-rise Mach number for the TF-102A was reduced by at least 0.06, the zero-lift peak wave drag was increased 50 percent, and the maximum lift-drag ratio was ...
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Aerodynamic characteristics of a circular cylinder at Mach number 6.86 and angles of attack up to 90 degrees

Aerodynamic characteristics of a circular cylinder at Mach number 6.86 and angles of attack up to 90 degrees

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Penland, Jim A
Description: Pressure-distribution and force tests of a circular cylinder have been made in the Langley 11-inch hypersonic tunnel at a Mach number of 6.88, a Reynolds number of 129,000, and angles of attack up to 90 degrees. The results are compared with the hypersonic approximation of Grimminger, Williams, and Young and a simple modification of the Newtonian flow theory. An evaluation of the crossflow theory is made through comparison of present results with available crossflow Mach number drag coefficients.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic interference of slender wing-tail combinations

Aerodynamic interference of slender wing-tail combinations

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Sacks, Alvin H
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
American Standard Recommended Practice for Drainage of Coal Mines (M6.1-1955, UDC 622.5)

American Standard Recommended Practice for Drainage of Coal Mines (M6.1-1955, UDC 622.5)

Date: 1957
Creator: United States. Bureau of Mines.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An analysis of the effects of aeroelasticity on static longitudinal stability and control of a swept-wing airplane

An analysis of the effects of aeroelasticity on static longitudinal stability and control of a swept-wing airplane

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Skoog, Richard B
Description: A theoretical analysis has been made of the effects of aeroelasticity on the static longitudinal stability and elevator angle required for balance of an airplane. The analysis is based on the familiar stability equation expressing the contribution of wing and tail to longitudinal stability. Effects of wing, tail, and fuselage flexibility are considered. Calculated effects are shown for a swept-wing bomber of relatively high flexibility.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Analytical investigation of the effect of water injection on supersonic turbojet-engine - inlet matching and thrust augmentation

Analytical investigation of the effect of water injection on supersonic turbojet-engine - inlet matching and thrust augmentation

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Beke, Andrew
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (41st). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1210 to 1253

Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (41st). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1210 to 1253

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: unknown
Description: Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (42nd). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1254 to 1295

Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (42nd). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1254 to 1295

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: unknown
Description: Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report: 1957

Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report: 1957

Date: 1957
Creator: Argonne National Laboratory
Description: Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory discussing the variety of work done at the laboratory during the year of 1957. This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Attenuation in a shock tube due to unsteady-boundary-layer action

Attenuation in a shock tube due to unsteady-boundary-layer action

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Mirels, Harold
Description: A method is presented for obtaining the attenuation of a shock wave in a shock tube due to the unsteady boundary layer along the shock-tube walls. It is assumed that the boundary layer is thin relative to the tube diameter and induces one-dimensional longitudinal pressure waves whose strength is proportional to the vertical velocity at the edge of the boundary layer. The contributions of the various regions in a shock tube to shock attenuation are indicated. The method is shown to be in reasonably good agreement with existing experimental data.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Average properties of compressible laminar boundary layer on flat plate with unsteady flight velocity

Average properties of compressible laminar boundary layer on flat plate with unsteady flight velocity

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Moore, Franklin K & Ostrach, Simon
Description: The time-average characteristics of boundary layers over a flat plate in nearly quasi-steady flow are determined. The plate may be either insulated or isothermal. The time averages are found without specifying the plate velocity explicitly except that it is positive and has an average value.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Base pressure at supersonic speeds on two-dimensional airfoils and on bodies of revolution with and without fins having turbulent boundary layers

Base pressure at supersonic speeds on two-dimensional airfoils and on bodies of revolution with and without fins having turbulent boundary layers

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: LOVE EUGENE S
Description: An analysis has been made of available experimental data to show the effects of most of the variables that are more predominant in determining base pressure at supersonic speeds. The analysis covers base pressures for two-dimensional airfoils and for bodies of revolution with and without stabilizing fins and is restricted to turbulent boundary layers. The present status of available experimental information is summarized as are the existing methods for predicting base pressure. A simple semiempirical method is presented for estimating base pressure. For two-dimensional bases, this method stems from an analogy established between the base-pressure phenomena and the peak pressure rise associated with the separation of the boundary layer. An analysis made for axially symmetric flow indicates that the base pressure for bodies of revolution is subject to the same analogy. Based upon the methods presented, estimations are made of such effects as Mach number, angle of attack, boattailing, fineness ratio, and fins. These estimations give fair predictions of experimental results. (author).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Basic considerations in the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels with air

Basic considerations in the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels with air

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Barnett, Henry C & Hibbard, Robert R
Description: Basic combustion research is collected, collated, and interpreted as it applies to flight propulsion. The following fundamental processes are treated in separate chapters: atomization and evaporation of liquid fuels, flow and mixing processes in combustion chambers, ignition and flammability of hydrocarbon fuels, laminar flame propagation, turbulent flames, flame stabilization, diffusion flames, oscillations in combustors, and smoke and coke formation in the combustion of hydrocarbon-air mixtures. Theoretical background, basic experimental data, and practical significance to flight propulsion are presented.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Bodies of revolution having minimum drag at high supersonic airspeeds

Bodies of revolution having minimum drag at high supersonic airspeeds

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Eggers, A J , Jr; Resnikoff, Meyer M & Dennis, David H
Description: Approximate shapes of nonlifting bodies having minimum pressure foredrag at high supersonic airspeeds are calculated. With the aid of Newton's law of resistance, the investigation is carried out for various combinations of the conditions of given body length, base diameter, surface area, and volume. In general, it is found that when body length is fixed, the body has a blunt nose; whereas, when the length is not fixed, the body has a sharp nose. The additional effect of curvature of the flow over the surface is investigated to determine its influence on the shapes for minimum drag. The effect is to increase the bluntness of the shapes in the region of the nose and the curvature in the region downstream of the nose. These shape modifications have, according to calculation, only a slight tendency to reduce drag. Several bodies of revolution of fineness ratios 3 and 5, including the calculated shapes of minimum drag for given length and base diameter and for given base diameter and surface area, were tested at Mach numbers from 2.73 to 6.28. A comparison of theoretical and experimental foredrag coefficients indicates that the calculated minimum-drag bodies are reasonable approximations to the correct shape.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Boundary-layer transition at Mach 3.12 as affected by cooling and nose blunting

Boundary-layer transition at Mach 3.12 as affected by cooling and nose blunting

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Diaconis, N S; Jack, John R & Wisniewski, Richard J
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cloud-droplet ingestion in engine inlets with inlet velocity ratios of 1.0 and 0.7

Cloud-droplet ingestion in engine inlets with inlet velocity ratios of 1.0 and 0.7

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Brun, Rinaldo J
Description: The paths of cloud droplets into two engine inlets have been calculated for a wide range of meteorological and flight conditions. The amount of water in droplet form ingested by the inlets and the amount and distribution of water impinging on the inlet walls are obtained from these droplet-trajectory calculations. In both types of inlet, a prolate ellipsoid of revolution represents either part or all of the forebody at the center of an annular inlet to an engine. The configurations can also represent a fuselage of an airplane with side ram-scoop inlets. The studies were made at an angle of attack of 0 degree. The principal difference between the two inlets studied is that the inlet-air velocity of one is 0.7 that of the other. The studies of the two velocity ratios lead to some important general concepts of water ingestion in inlets.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Combustion of Solid Fuels in Thin Beds

Combustion of Solid Fuels in Thin Beds

Date: 1957
Creator: Carman, E. P.; Graf, E. G. & Corey, R. C.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Comparison of calculated and experimental load distributions on thin wings at high subsonic and sonic speeds

Comparison of calculated and experimental load distributions on thin wings at high subsonic and sonic speeds

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Crigler, John L
Description: A method for calculating the aerodynamic loading on a wing in combination with a body is presented. Calculated results are compared with experimentally measured data for two wing-body configurations throughout a range of Mach number up to 1.0. The magnitude and the distribution of spanwise loading of the calculated data are generally in good agreement with the experimental data.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Comparison of mechanical properties of flat sheets, molded shapes, and postformed shapes of cotton-fabric phenolic laminates

Comparison of mechanical properties of flat sheets, molded shapes, and postformed shapes of cotton-fabric phenolic laminates

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Reinhart, F W; Good, C L; Turner, P S & Wolock, I
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Comparison of several methods for obtaining the time response of linear systems to either a unit impulse or arbitrary input from frequency-response data

Comparison of several methods for obtaining the time response of linear systems to either a unit impulse or arbitrary input from frequency-response data

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Donegan, James J & Huss, Carl R
Description: Several methods of obtaining the time response of Linear systems to either a unit impulse or an arbitrary input from frequency-response data are described and compared. Comparisons indicate that all the methods give good accuracy when applied to a second-order system; the main difference is the required computing time. The methods generally classified as inverse Laplace transform methods were found to be most effective in determining the response to a unit impulse from frequency-response data of higher order systems. Some discussion and examples are given of the use of such methods as flight-data-analysis techniques in predicting loads and motions of a flexible aircraft on the basis of simple calculations when the aircraft frequency response is known.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Concluding Report of Free-Spinning, Tumbling, and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/18-Scale Model of the Ryan X-13 Airplane, Coord. No. AF-199

Concluding Report of Free-Spinning, Tumbling, and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/18-Scale Model of the Ryan X-13 Airplane, Coord. No. AF-199

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Bowman, James S., Jr.
Description: An investigation has been completed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/18-scale model of the Ryan X-13 airplane to determine its spin, recovery, and tumbling characteristics, and to determine the minimum altitude from which a belly landing could be made in case of power failure in hovering flight. Model spin tests were conducted with and without simulated engine rotation. Tests without simulated engine rotation indicated two types of spins: one, a slightly oscillatory flat spin; and the other, a violently oscillatory spin. Tests with simulated engine rotation indicated that spins to the left were fast rotating and steep and those to the right were slow rotating and flat. The optimum technique for recovery is reversal of the rudder to against the spin and simultaneous movement of the ailerons to full with the spin followed by movement of the elevators to neutral after the spin rotation ceases. Tumbling tests made on the model indicated that although the Ryan X-13 airplane will not tumble in the ordinary sense (end-over-end pitching motion), it may instead tend to enter a wild gyrating'motion. Tests made to simulate power failure in hovering flight by dropping the model indicated that the model entered what appeared ...
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Correlation, evaluation, and extension of linearized theories for tire motion and wheel shimmy

Correlation, evaluation, and extension of linearized theories for tire motion and wheel shimmy

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Smiley, Robert F
Description: An evaluation is made of the existing theories of a linearized tire motion and wheel shimmy. It is demonstrated that most of the previously published theories represent varying degrees of approximation to a summary theory developed in this report which is a minor modification of the basic theory of Von Schlippe and Dietrich. In most cases where strong differences exist between the previously published theories and summary theory, the previously published theories are shown to possess certain deficiencies. A series of systematic approximations to the summary theory is developed for the treatment of problems too simple to merit the use of the complete summary theory, and procedures are discussed for applying the summary theory and its systematic approximations to the shimmy of more complex landing-gear structures than have previously been considered. Comparisons of the existing experimental data with the predictions of the summary theory and the systematic approximations provide a fair substantiation of the more detailed approximate theories.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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