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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Accelerations in fighter-airplane crashes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63594/
Comparison of flight performance of AN-F-58 and AN-F-32 fuels in J35 turbojet engine
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57982/
Effects of inlet icing on performance of axial-flow turbojet engine in natural icing conditions
A flight investigation in natural icing conditions was conducted to determine the effect of inlet ice formations on the performance of axial-flow turbojet engines. The results are presented for icing conditions ranging from a liquid-water content of 0.1 to 0.9 gram per cubic meter and water-droplet size from 10 to 27 microns at ambient-air temperature from 13 to 26 degrees F. The data show time histories of jet thrust, air flow, tail-pipe temperature, compressor efficiency, and icing parameters for each icing encounter. The effect of inlet-guide-vane icing was isolated and shown to account for approximately one-half the total reduction in performance caused by inlet icing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58470/
Preliminary results of natural icing of an axial-flow turbojet engine
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57582/
Flight Comparison of Performance and Cooling Characteristics of Exhaust-Ejector Installation with Exhaust-Collector-Ring Installation
Flight and ground investigations have been made to compare an exhaust-ejector installation with a standard exhaust-collector-ring installation on air-cooled aircraft engines in a twin-engine airplane. The ground investigation allowed that, whereas the standard engine would have overheated above 600 horsepower, the engine with exhaust ejectors cooled at take-off operating conditions at zero ram. The exhaust ejectors provided as much cooling with cowl flaps closed as the conventional cowl flaps induced when full open at low airspeeds. The propulsive thrust of the exhaust-ejector installation was calculated to be slightly less than the thrust of the collector-ring-installation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63773/
Air forces on airfoils moving faster than sound
We are undertaking the task of computing the air forces on a slightly cambered airfoil in the absence of friction and with an infinite aspect ratio. We also assume in advance that the leading edge is very sharp and that its tangent lies in the direction of motion. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59216/
Drag measurements of two thin wing sections at different index values
It is stated that the index value 6000, as found in normal tests of wing sections with a 20 cm chord, falls in the same region where the transition of laminar to turbulent flow takes place on thin flat plates. It is to be expected that slightly cambered, thin wing sections will behave similarly. The following test of two such wing sections were made for the purpose of verifying this supposition. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65241/
Experiments on airfoils with trailing edge cut away
Airfoils with their trailing edge cut away are often found on aircraft, as the fins on the hulls of flying boats and the central section of the wings for affording better visibility. It was therefore of some interest to discover the effect of such cutaways on the lift and drag and on the position of the center of pressure. For this purpose, systematic experiments were performed on two different airfoils, a symmetrical airfoil and an airfoil of medium thickness, with successive shortenings of their chords. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65246/
Experiments with an airfoil from which the boundary layer is removed by suction
Our attempts to improve the properties of airfoils by removing the boundary layer by suction, go back to 1922. The object of the suction is chiefly to prevent the detachment of the boundary layer from the surface of the airfoil. At large angles of attack, such detachment prevents the attainment of the great lift promised by the theory, besides greatly increasing the drag, especially of thick airfoils. This report gives results of those experiments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65081/
High-speed wind tunnels
Wind tunnel construction and design is discussed especially in relation to subsonic and supersonic speeds. Reynolds Numbers and the theory of compressible flows are also taken into consideration in designing new tunnels. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63396/
Present and future problems of airplane propulsion
Some of the problems considered in this report include: thermodynamics of surface friction, application of thick wing sections, special applications of controllable propellers, and gas turbines for aircraft. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63144/
Recent experiments at the Gottingen Aerodynamic Institute
This report presents the results of various experiments carried out at the Gottingen Aerodynamic Institute. These include: experiments with Joukowski wing profiles; experiments on an airplane model with a built-in motor and functioning propeller; and the rotating cylinder (Magnus Effect). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59236/
Removing boundary layer by suction
Through the utilization of the "Magnus effect" on the Flettner rotor ship, the attention of the public has been directed to the underlying physical principle. It has been found that the Prandtl boundary-layer theory furnishes a satisfactory explanation of the observed phenomena. The present article deals with the prevention of this separation or detachment of the flow by drawing the boundary layer into the inside of a body through a slot or slots in its surface. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65203/
Aerodynamic Heat-Power Engine Operating on a Closed Cycle
Hot-air engines with dynamic compressors and turbines offer new prospects of success through utilization of units of high efficiencies and through the employment of modern materials of great strength at high temperature. Particular consideration is given to an aerodynamic prime mover operating on a closed circuit and heated externally. Increase of the pressure level of the circulating air permits a great increase of limit load of the unit. This also affords a possibility of regulation for which the internal efficiency of the unit changes but slightly. The effect of pressure and temperature losses is investigated. A general discussion is given of the experimental installation operating at the Escher Wyss plant in Zurich for a considerable time at high temperatures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63985/
Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Cavitation in Water
The cavitation in nozzles on airfoils of various shape and on a sphere are experimentally investigated. The limits of cavitation and the extension of the zone of the bubbles in different stages of cavitation are photographically established. The pressure in the bubble area is constant and very low, jumping to high values at the end of the area. The analogy with the gas compression shock is adduced and discussed. The collapse of the bubbles under compression shock produces very high pressures internally, which must be contributory factors to corrosion. The pressure required for purely mechanical corrosion is also discussed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64497/
Investigations of Compression Shocks and Boundary Layers in Gases Moving at High Speed
The mutual influences of compression shocks and friction boundary layers were investigated by means of high speed wind tunnels.Schlieren optics provided a clear picture of the flow phenomena and were used for determining the location of the compression shocks, measurement of shock angles, and also for Mach angles. Pressure measurement and humidity measurements were also taken into consideration.Results along with a mathematical model are described. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63820/
Investigations on wings with and without sweepback at high subsonic speeds
Drag tests at zero lift have been made at Mach numbers from 0.7 to approximately 0.95 in the high speed wind tunnel of the Institute of Aerodynamics, ETH, Zurich, on a group of untapered wings of aspect ratio 3.25, having sweep angles of 0 degree and 35 degrees. For each sweep angle, a series of geometrically similar models was tested at a constant Reynolds number to provide a verification of computed tunnel blocking corrections. Tests were also made for wings having thickness ratios of 0.09 and 0.12 and the results compared with results predicted by von Karman's similarity law. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62971/
Flight measurements of the effect of various amounts of aileron droop on the low-speed lateral-control characteristics of an observation airplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279604/
Flight measurements of the effects of a wing leading-edge slot and other modifications on the stability, maximum lift, and high speed of an observation airplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62501/
Solidification and Separation of Ice From Saline Water
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11646/
Theoretical damping in roll and rolling moment due to differential wing incidence for slender cruciform wings and wing-body combinations
A method of analysis based on slender-wing theory is developed to investigate the characteristics in roll of slender cruciform wings and wing-body combinations. The method makes use of the conformal mapping processes of classical hydrodynamics which transform the region outside a circle and the region outside an arbitrary arrangement of line segments intersecting at the origin. The method of analysis may be utilized to solve other slender cruciform wing-body problems involving arbitrarily assigned boundary conditions. (author). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65675/
Flying qualities of a high-performance personal-owner airplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64529/
Tests of a centering spring used as an artificial feel device on the elevator of a fighter airplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59301/
Theoretical study of the lateral frequency response to gusts of a fighter airplane, both with controls fixed and with several types of autopilots
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57759/
Temperature-Induced Stresses in Solids of Elementary Shape
Report discussing how solids subjected to non-uniform temperature change develop internal stresses determined by, (1) the temperature distribution within the solid, and (2) certain physical constants of the material. For two varieties of heating, the equations determining stress have been put in convenient form for practical use, and tables of certain temperature functions show how to determine stresses in a slab, in a cylinder, or in a sphere subjected to either of two modes of heating. The temperature-distribution tables independently provide a useful means for the ready estimation of temperature gradients. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70428/
Determination of Shapes of Boattail Bodies of Revolution for Minimum Wave Drag
By use of an approximate equation for the wave drag of slender bodies of revolution in a supersonic flow field, the optimum shapes of certain boattail bodies are determined for minimum wave drag. The properties of three specific families of bodies are determined, the first family consisting of bodies having a given length and base area and a contour passing through a prescribed point between the nose and base, the second family having fixed length, base area, and maximum area, and the third family having given length, volume, and base area. The method presented is easily generalized to determine minimum-wave-drag profile shapes which have contours that must pass through any prescribed number of points. According to linearized theory, the optimum profiles are found to have infinite slope at the nose but zero radius of curvature so that the bodies appear to have pointed noses, a zero slope at the body base, and no variation of wave drag with Mach number. For those bodies having a specified intermediate.diameter (that is, location and magnitude given), the maximum body diameter is shown to be larger, in general, than the specified diameter. It is also shown that, for bodies having a specified maximum diameter, the location of the maximum diameter is not arbitrary but is determined from the ratio of base diameter to maximum diameter. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53152/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.1
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100366/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.2
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100367/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.4
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100369/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.5
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100370/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.6
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100371/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.7
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100372/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.8
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100373/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.9
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100374/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.10
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100375/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.11
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100376/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.13
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100378/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.14
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100379/
Reactor Development Program Progress Report: April 1963
Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory discussing progress made by the Reactor Development Program during April 1963. Reactor physics, experiments, and safety studies are presented. This report includes tables, and illustrations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc170903/
Reactor Development Program Progress Report: March 1963
Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory discussing progress made by the Reactor Development Program during March 1963. Reactor physics, experiments, and safety studies are presented. This report includes tables, and illustrations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc170900/
Reactor Development Program Progress Report: May 1966
Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory discussing progress made by the Reactor Development Program during May 1966. Reactor physics, experiments, and safety studies are presented. This report includes tables, and illustrations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc170908/
Reactor Development Program Progress Report: November 1965
Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory discussing progress made by the Reactor Development Program during November 1965. Reactor physics, experiments, and safety studies are presented. This report includes tables, and illustrations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc170906/
Reactor Development Program Progress Report: September 1966
Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory discussing progress made within the Reactor Development Program for September, 1966. The report includes highlights of the different project activities including plutonium utilization, fast breeder reactors, general reactor technology, advanced systems research, and nuclear safety. This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc170910/
Flight investigation of the effect of a local change in wing contour on chordwise pressure distribution at high speeds
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55098/
Tests of a Horizontal-Tail Model through the Transonic Speed Range by the NACA Wing-Flow Method
A 1/12-scale model of a horizontal tail of a fighter airplane was tested through the transonic speeds in the high-speed flow over an airplane wing, the surface of which served as a reflection plane for the model. Measurements of lift, elevator-hinge moment, angle of attack, and elevator angle were made in the Mach number range from 0.75 to 1.04 for elevator deflections ranging from 10 degrees to minus 10 degrees, and for angles of attack of minus 1.2 degrees, 0.4 degrees, and 3.4 degrees. The equipment used to measure the hinge moments of the model proved to be unsatisfactory, and for this reason the hinge-moment data are considered to be only qualitative. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63801/
Coal-Mine Accidents in the United States, 1930
Report compiled by the U.S. Bureau of Mines including statistics on fatal and non-fatal accidents in coal mines located in the United States as well as data regarding the various operations (e.g., number of miners employed and average production). The information is organized into tables for comparison and the text draws some overall conclusions in the summary. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12525/
Coal-Mine Accidents in the United States, 1932
Report compiled by the U.S. Bureau of Mines including statistics on fatal and non-fatal accidents in coal mines located in the United States as well as data regarding the various operations (e.g., number of miners employed and average production). The information is organized into tables for comparison and the text draws some overall conclusions in the summary. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12548/
Coal-Mine Accidents in the United States, 1933
Report compiled by the U.S. Bureau of Mines including statistics on fatal and non-fatal accidents in coal mines located in the United States as well as data regarding the various operations (e.g., number of miners employed and average production). The information is organized into tables for comparison and the text draws some overall conclusions in the summary. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12555/
Coal-Mine Accidents in the United States, 1934
Report compiled by the U.S. Bureau of Mines including statistics on fatal and non-fatal accidents in coal mines located in the United States as well as data regarding the various operations (e.g., number of miners employed and average production). The information is organized into tables for comparison and the text draws some overall conclusions in the summary. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12564/
Coal-Mine Accidents in the United States, 1935
Report compiled by the U.S. Bureau of Mines including statistics on fatal and non-fatal accidents in coal mines located in the United States as well as data regarding the various operations (e.g., number of miners employed and average production). The information is organized into tables for comparison and the text draws some overall conclusions in the summary. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12574/