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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Notes
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Experiments with an airfoil model on which the boundary layers are controlled without the use of supplementary equipment

Experiments with an airfoil model on which the boundary layers are controlled without the use of supplementary equipment

Date: April 1, 1931
Creator: Abbott, I H
Description: This report describes test made in the Variable Density Wind Tunnel of the NACA to determine the possibility of controlling the boundary layer on the upper surface of an airfoil by use of the low pressure existing near the leading edge. The low pressure was used to induce flow through slots in the upper surface of the wing. The tests showed that the angle of attack for maximum lift was increased at the expense of a reduction in the maximum lift coefficient and an increase in the drag coefficient.
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Fuselage-drag tests in the variable-density wind tunnel: streamline bodies of revolution, fineness ratio of 5

Fuselage-drag tests in the variable-density wind tunnel: streamline bodies of revolution, fineness ratio of 5

Date: September 1, 1937
Creator: Abbott, Ira H
Description: Results are presented of the drag tests of six bodies of revolution with systematically varying shapes and with a fineness ratio of 5. The forms were derived from source-sink distributions, and formulas are presented for the calculation of the pressure distribution of the forms. The tests were made in the N.A.C.A. variable-density tunnel over a range of values of Reynolds number from about 1,500,000 to 25,000,000. The results show that the bodies with the sharper noses and tails have the lowest drag coefficients, even when the drag coefficients are based on the two-thirds power of the volume. The data shows the most important single characteristic of the body form to be the tail angle, which must be fine to obtain low drag.
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Flow observations with tufts and lampblack of the stalling of four typical airfoil sections in the NACA variable-density tunnel

Flow observations with tufts and lampblack of the stalling of four typical airfoil sections in the NACA variable-density tunnel

Date: October 1, 1938
Creator: Abbott, Ira H & Sherman, Albert
Description: A preliminary investigation of the stalling processes of four typical airfoil sections was made over the critical range of the Reynolds Number. Motion pictures were taken of the movements of small silk tufts on the airfoil surface as the angle of attack increased through a range of angles including the stall. The boundary-layer flow also at certain angles of attack was indicated by the patterns formed by a suspension of lampblack in oil brushed onto the airfoil surface. These observations were analyzed together with corresponding force-test measurements to derive a picture of the stalling processes of airfoils.
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A simplified method for the calculation of airfoil pressure distribution

A simplified method for the calculation of airfoil pressure distribution

Date: May 1, 1939
Creator: Allen, H Julian
Description: A method is presented for the rapid calculation of the pressure distribution over an airfoil section when the normal-force distribution and the pressure distribution over the "base profile" (i.e., the profile of the same airfoil were the camber line straight and the resulting airfoil at zero angle of attack) are known. This note is intended as a supplement to N.A.C.A. Report Nos. 631 and 634 wherein methods are presented for the calculation of the normal-force distribution over plain and flapped airfoils, respectively, but not of the pressures on the individual surfaces. Base-profile pressure-coefficient distributions for the usual N.A.C.A. family of airfoils, which are also suitable for several other commonly employed airfoils, are included in tabular form. With these tabulated base-profile pressures and the computed normal-force distributions, pressure distributions adequate for most engineering purposes can be obtained.
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Tank tests of Model 36 flying boat hull

Tank tests of Model 36 flying boat hull

Date: March 1, 1938
Creator: Allison, John
Description: N.A.C.A. Model 36, a hull form with parallel middle body for half the length of the forebody and designed particularly for use with stub wings, was tested according to the general fixed-trim method over the range of practical loads, trims, and speeds. It was also tested free to trim with the center of gravity at two different positions. The results are given in the form of nondimensional coefficients. The resistance at the hump was exceptionally low but, at high planing speeds, afterbody interference made the performance only mediocre.
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Tank tests of a model of one hull of the Savoia S-55-X flying boat -N.A.C.A. Model 46

Tank tests of a model of one hull of the Savoia S-55-X flying boat -N.A.C.A. Model 46

Date: February 1, 1938
Creator: Allison, John M
Description: A model of one of the twin hulls of the Italian Savoia S-55-X flying boat (N.A.C.A. Model 46) was tested in the N.A.C.A. tank according to the general method. The data obtained from these tests cover a broad range of speeds, loads, and trims and are given in nondimensional form to facilitate their use in applying this form of hull to any other flying boat or comparing it's performance with the performance of any other hulls. The results show that the resistance characteristics at best trim of this model are excellent throughout the speed range. In order to compare the performance of the S-55-X hull with that of the 35, a pointed-step hull developed at the N.A.C.A. tank, the data are used in the computations of take-off example of a twin-hull, 23,500-pound flying boat. The calculations show that the S-55-X hull has better take-off performance.
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Tanks test of a model of the hull of the Navy PB-1 flying boat - N.A.C.A. Model 52

Tanks test of a model of the hull of the Navy PB-1 flying boat - N.A.C.A. Model 52

Date: August 1, 1936
Creator: Allison, John M
Description: A model of the hull of the Navy PB-1 flying boat was tested in the N.A.C.A. tank as part of a program intended to provide information regarding the water performance of hulls of flying boats of earlier design for which hydrodynamic data have heretofore been unavailable. Tests were made according to the general method over the range of practical loadings with the model both fixed in trim and free to trim. A free-to-trim test according to the specific method was also made for the design load and take-off speed corresponding to those of the full-scale flying boat. The resistance obtained from the fixed-trim test was found to be about the same as that of the model of the NC flying-boat hull, and greater at the hump but smaller at high speeds than that of a model of the Sikorsky S-40 flying-boat hull.
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Tank tests of models of flying boat hulls having longitudinal steps

Tank tests of models of flying boat hulls having longitudinal steps

Date: July 1, 1936
Creator: Allison, John M & Ward, Kenneth E
Description: Four models with longitudinal steps on the forebody were developed by modification of a model of a conventional hull and were tested in the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) tank. Models with longitudinal steps were found to have smaller resistance at high speed and greater resistance at low speed than the parent model that had the same afterbody but a conventional V-section forebody. The models with a single longitudinal step had better performance at hump speed and as low high-speed resistance except at very light loads. Spray strips at angles from 0 degrees to 45 degrees to the horizontal were fitted at the longitudinal steps and at the chine on one of the two step models having two longitudinal steps. The resistance and the height of the spray were less with each of the spray strips than without; the most favorable angle was found to lie between 15 degrees and 30 degrees.
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The Effect of the Angle of Afterbody Keel on the Water Performance of a Flying-Boat Hull Model

The Effect of the Angle of Afterbody Keel on the Water Performance of a Flying-Boat Hull Model

Date: September 1, 1935
Creator: Allison, John M.
Description: NACA model 11-C was tested according to the general method with the angle of afterbody keel set at five different angles from 2-1/2 degrees to 9 degrees, but without changing other features of the hull. The results of the tests are expressed in curves of test data and of non-dimensional coefficients. At the depth of step used in the tests, 3.3 percent beam, the smaller angles of afterbody keel give greater load-resistance ratios at the hump speed and smaller at high speed than the larger angles of afterbody keel. Comparisons are made of the load-resistance ratios at several other points in the speed range. The effect of variation of the angle of afterbody keel upon the take-off performance of a hypothetical flying boat of 15,000 pounds gross weight having a hull of model 11-C lines is calculated, and the calculations show that the craft with the largest of the angles of afterbody keel tested, 9 degrees, takes off in the least time and distance.
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The aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils at negative angles of attack

The aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils at negative angles of attack

Date: March 1, 1932
Creator: Anderson, Raymond F
Description: A number of airfoils, including 14 commonly used airfoils and 10 NACA airfoils, were tested through the negative angle-of-attack range in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel at a Reynolds Number of approximately 3,000,000. The tests were made to supply data to serve as a basis for the structural design of airplanes in the inverted flight condition. In order to make the results immediately available for this purpose they are presented herein in preliminary form, together with results of previous tests of the airfoils at positive angles of attack. An analysis of the results made to find the variation of the ratio of the maximum negative lift coefficient to the maximum positive lift coefficient led to the following conclusions: 1) For airfoils of a given thickness, the ratio -C(sub L max) / +C(sub L max) tends to decrease as the mean camber is increased. 2) For airfoils of a given mean camber, the ratio -C(sub L max) / +C(sub L max) tends to increase as the thickness increases.
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