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 Decade: 1920-1929
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Reports
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Stability of the parachute and helicopter

Stability of the parachute and helicopter

Date: January 1, 1920
Creator: Batemen, H
Description: This report deals with an extension of the theory of stability in oscillation to the case of aircraft following a vertical trajectory, and particularly to the oscillations of parachutes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Diaphragms for Aeronautic Instruments

Diaphragms for Aeronautic Instruments

Date: January 1, 1924
Creator: Hersey, M D
Description: This investigation was carried out at the request of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and comprises an outline of historical developments and theoretical principles, together with a discussion of expedients for making the most effective use of existing diaphragms actuated by the hydrostatic pressure form an essential element of a great variety instruments for aeronautic and other technical purposes. The various physical data needed as a foundation for rational methods of diaphragm design have not, however, been available hitherto except in the most fragmentary form.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Performance of B. M. W. 185-Horsepower Airplane Engine

Performance of B. M. W. 185-Horsepower Airplane Engine

Date: January 1, 1923
Creator: Sparrow, S W
Description: This report deals with the results of a test made upon a B. M. W. Engine in the altitude chamber of the Bureau of Standards, where controlled conditions of temperature and pressure can be made to simulate those of the desired altitude. A remarkably low value of fuel consumption - 041 per B. H. P. hour - is obtained at 1,200 revolutions per minute at an air density of 0.064 pound per cubic foot and a brake thermal efficiency of 33 per cent and an indicated efficiency of 37 per cent at the above speed and density. In spite of the fact that the carburetor adjustment does not permit the air-fuel ratio of maximum economy to be obtained at air densities lower than 0.064, the economy is superior to most engines tested thus far, even at a density lower than 0.064, the economies superior to most engines tested thus far, even at a density (0.03) corresponding to an altitude of 25,000 feet. The brake mean effective pressure even at full throttle is rather low. Since the weight of much of the engine is governed more by its piston displacement than by the power developed, a decreased mean effective pressure usually ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supplies and production of aircraft woods

Supplies and production of aircraft woods

Date: January 1, 1920
Creator: Sparhawk, W N
Description: The purpose of this report is to present in brief form such information as is available regarding the supplies of the kinds of wood that have been used or seem likely to become important in the construction of airplanes, and the amount of lumber of each species normally put on the market each year. A general statement is given of the uses to which each kind of wood is or may be put.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An Introduction to the Laws of Air Resistance of Aerofoils

An Introduction to the Laws of Air Resistance of Aerofoils

Date: January 1, 1920
Creator: De Bothezat, George
Description: Report presents methods of calculating air resistance of airfoils under certain conditions of flow phenomena around the airfoil.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Nomenclature for Aeronautics

Nomenclature for Aeronautics

Date: January 1, 1924
Creator: unknown
Description: This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature by the Executive Committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held August 11, 1933. This publication supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Analysis of W. F. Durand's and E. P. Lesley's propeller tests

Analysis of W. F. Durand's and E. P. Lesley's propeller tests

Date: January 1, 1924
Creator: Munk, Max M
Description: This report is a critical study of the results of propeller model tests with the view of obtaining a clear insight into the mechanism of the propeller action and of examining the soundness of the physical explanation generally given. The nominal slip-stream velocity is plotted against the propeller tip velocity, both measured by the velocity of flight as a unit. Within the range corresponding to conditions of flight, the curve thus obtained is a straight line. Its inclination depends chiefly on the effective blade width, its position on the effective pitch. These two quantities can therefore be determined from the result of each propeller test. Both can easily be estimated therefrom for new propellers of similar type. Thus, a simple method for the computation of propellers suggests itself.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Characteristics of a twin-float seaplane during take-off

Characteristics of a twin-float seaplane during take-off

Date: January 1, 1927
Creator: Crowley, John W , Jr & Ronan, K M
Description: This report presents the results of an investigation of the planing and get-away characteristics of three representative types of seaplanes, namely, single float, boat, and twin float. The experiments carried out on the single float and boat types have been reported on previously. This report covers the investigation conducted on the twin-float seaplane, the DT-2, and includes as an appendix, a brief summary of the results obtained on all three tests. At low-water speeds, 20 to 30 miles per hour, the seaplane trims by the stern and has a high resistance. Above these speeds the longitudinal control becomes increasingly effective until, with corresponding speeds of 56 to 46 miles per hour. It was further determined that an increase in the load caused little if any change in the water speed at which the maximum angle and resistance occurred, but that it did produce an increase in the maximum angle.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Minimum Induced Drag of Aerofoils

The Minimum Induced Drag of Aerofoils

Date: January 1, 1923
Creator: Munk, Max M
Description: This report helps explain the phenomenon of flight. It contains some theorems concerning the arrangement of airplane wings which are of considerable practical interest. In particular, it shows the theoretical reasons for the decrease of drag which accompanies all increase in the aspect ratio or lateral extension of a wing. The efficiency of a given arrangement of wings may be calculated from the formulae derived in this paper.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Some new aerodynamical relations

Some new aerodynamical relations

Date: January 1, 1923
Creator: Munk, Max M
Description: This report contains three new relations extending the modern theory of aeronautics. They deal with phenomena in a frictionless fluid. The first part contains a relation between the power absorbed by an aerofoil and the power absorbed by a propeller. In the second part the exactness of the ordinary formula for the induced drag of an aerofoil is examined and the error is determined. In the third part the author shows that for the calculation of the air forces on bodies of considerable volume the imaginary sources and sinks equivalent to the flow around the body can be used in the same way as vortices are used for the calculation of lift and induced drag of wings.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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