You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Research Memorandums
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Flight investigation of a liquid hydrogen fuel system

Flight investigation of a liquid hydrogen fuel system

Date: August 19, 1957
Creator: Acker, L. W.; Christenson, H. H.; Gough, W. V. & Mulholland, D. R.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Design and performance of fuel control for aircraft hydrogen fuel system

Design and performance of fuel control for aircraft hydrogen fuel system

Date: August 19, 1957
Creator: Hiller, K. W.; Otto, E. W. & Ross, P. S.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102A airplane at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01

Aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102A airplane at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01

Date: September 30, 1955
Creator: Spearman, M Leroy & Driver, Cornelius
Description: Tests have been made in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01 of various arrangements of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102A airplane with faired inlets. Tests made of the model equipped with a plain wing, a wing with 6.4 percent conical camber, and a wing with 15 percent conical camber. Body modifications including an extended nose, a modified canopy, and extended afterbody fillets were evaluated. In addition, the effects of a revised vertical tail and two different ventral fins were determined. The results indicated that the use of cambered wings resulted in lower drag in the lift-coefficient range above 0.2. This range, however, is above that which would generally be required for level flight; hence, the usefulness of camber might be confined to increased maneuverability at the higher lifts while its use may be detrimental to the high-speed (low-lift) capabilities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Comparison of Several Methods of Cyclic De-Icing of a Gas-Heated Airfoil

Comparison of Several Methods of Cyclic De-Icing of a Gas-Heated Airfoil

Date: June 22, 1953
Creator: Gray, Vernon H. & Bowden, Dean T.
Description: Several methods of cyclic de-icing of a gas-heated airfoil were investigated to determine ice-removal characteristics and heating requirements. The cyclic de-icing system with a spanwise ice-free parting strip in the stagnation region and a constant-temperature gas-supply duct gave the quickest and most reliable ice removal. Heating requirements for the several methods of cyclic de-icing are compared, and the savings over continuous ice prevention are shown. Data are presented to show the relation of surface temperature, rate of surface heating, and heating time to the removal of ice.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Investigation of Porous Gas-Heated Leading-Edge Section for Icing Protection of a Delta Wing

Investigation of Porous Gas-Heated Leading-Edge Section for Icing Protection of a Delta Wing

Date: January 19, 1955
Creator: Bowden, Dean T.
Description: A tip section of a delta wing having an NACA 0004-65 airfoil section and a 600 leading-edge sweepback was equipped with a porous leading-edge section through which hot gas was 'bled for anti-icing. Heating rates for anti-icing were determined for a wide range of icing conditions. The effects of gas flow through the porous leading-edge section on airfoil pressure distribution and drag in dry air were investigated. The drag increase caused by an ice formation on the unheated airfoil was measured for several icing conditions. Experimental porous surface- to free-stream convective heat-transfer coefficients were obtained in dry air and compared with theory. Adequate icing protection was obtained at all icing conditions investigated. Savings in total gas-flow rate up to 42 percent may be obtained with no loss in anti-icing effectiveness by sealing half the upper-surface porous area. Gas flow through the leading-edge section had no appreciable effect on airfoil pressure distribution. The airfoil section drag increased slightly (5-percent average) with gas flow through the porous surface. A heavy glaze-ice formation produced after 10 minutes of icing caused an increase in section drag coefficient of 240 percent. Experimental convective heat-transfer coefficients obtained with hot-gas flow through the porous area in dry ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effectiveness of Thermal-Pneumatic Airfoil-Ice-Protection System

Effectiveness of Thermal-Pneumatic Airfoil-Ice-Protection System

Date: April 13, 1951
Creator: Gowan, William H., Jr. & Mulholland, Donald R.
Description: Icing and drag investigations were conducted in the NACA Lewis icing research tunnel employing a combination thermal-pneumatic de-icer mounted on a 42-inch-chord NACA 0018 airfoil. The de-icer consisted of a 3-inch-wide electrically heated strip symmetrically located about the leading edge with inflatable tubes on the upper and lower airfoil surfaces aft of the heated area. The entire de-icer extended to approximately 25 percent of chord. A maximum power density of 9.25 watts per square inch was required for marginal ice protection on the airfoil leading edge at an air temperature of 00 F and an airspeed of 300 miles per hour. Drag measurements indicated, that without icing, the de-icer installation increased the section drag to approximately 140 percent of that of the bare airfoil; with the tubes inflated, this value increased to a maximum of approximately 620 percent. A 2-minute tube-inflation cycle prevented excessive ice formation on the inflatable area although small scattered residual Ice formations remained after inflation and were removed intermittently during later cycles. Effects of the time lag of heater temperatures after initial application of power and the insulating effect of ice formations on heater temperatures were also determined.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An investigation of ejection releases of submerged and semisubmerged dynamically scaled stores from a simulated bomb bay of a fighter- bomber airplane at supersonic speeds

An investigation of ejection releases of submerged and semisubmerged dynamically scaled stores from a simulated bomb bay of a fighter- bomber airplane at supersonic speeds

Date: December 26, 1956
Creator: Carter, H. S. & Lee, J. B.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Investigation of the Static Longitudinal and Lateral Stability Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Mcdonnell F4H-1 Airplane at Mach Numbers of 1.59, 1.89, and 2.09

Preliminary Investigation of the Static Longitudinal and Lateral Stability Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Mcdonnell F4H-1 Airplane at Mach Numbers of 1.59, 1.89, and 2.09

Date: March 23, 1956
Creator: Carmel, M. M. & Gregory, D. T.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Altitude starting tests of a small solid propellant rocket

Altitude starting tests of a small solid propellant rocket

Date: June 21, 1957
Creator: Krawczoner, E. M. & Sloop, J. L.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Measurement of static forces on internally carried bombs of three fineness ratios in flow field of a swept-wing fighter-bomber configuration at a Mach number of 1.61 with illustrative drop path calculations

Measurement of static forces on internally carried bombs of three fineness ratios in flow field of a swept-wing fighter-bomber configuration at a Mach number of 1.61 with illustrative drop path calculations

Date: January 10, 1957
Creator: Carlson, H. W. & Smith, N. F.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department