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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Research Memorandums
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
An 8-foot axisymmetrical fixed nozzle for subsonic Mach numbers up to 0.99 and for a supersonic Mach number of 1.2

An 8-foot axisymmetrical fixed nozzle for subsonic Mach numbers up to 0.99 and for a supersonic Mach number of 1.2

Date: February 23, 1950
Creator: Ritchie, Virgil S; Wright, Ray H & Tulin, Marshall P
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Ability of pilots to control simulated short-period yawing oscillations

Ability of pilots to control simulated short-period yawing oscillations

Date: November 13, 1950
Creator: Phillips, William H & Cheatham, Donald C
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Abstracts pertaining to seaplanes

Abstracts pertaining to seaplanes

Date: July 24, 1947
Creator: Bidwell, Jerold M & King, Douglas A
Description: About 400 references pertaining to the hydrodynamic design of seaplanes have been compiled, and the information is presented in the form of abstracts classified under six main headings.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Acceleration characteristics of a turbojet engine with variable-position inlet guide vanes

Acceleration characteristics of a turbojet engine with variable-position inlet guide vanes

Date: July 7, 1955
Creator: Dobson, W F & Wallner, Lewis E
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Acceleration Characteristics of R-3350 Engine Equipped with NACA Injection Impeller

Acceleration Characteristics of R-3350 Engine Equipped with NACA Injection Impeller

Date: January 8, 1947
Creator: Hickel, Robert O. & Snider, William E.
Description: Qualitative investigations have shown that use of the NACA injection impeller with the R-3350 engine increases the inertia of the fuel-injection system and, when the standard fuel-metering system is used, this increase in inertia results in poor engine acceleration characteristics. This investigation was therefore undertaken to determine whether satisfactory acceleration characteristics of the engine equipped with the injection impeller could be obtained by simple modifications to the fuel-monitoring system. The engine was operated with two types of carburetor; namely, a hydraulic-metering carburetor incorporating a vacuum-operated accelerating pump and a direct-metering carburetor having a throttle-actuated accelerating pump. The vacuum-operated accelerating pump of the hydraulic-metering carburetor was modified to produce satisfactory accelerations by supplementing the standard air chamber with an additional 75-cubic spring. The throttle-actuated accelerating pump of the direct-metering carburetor was modified to produce satisfactory accelerations by replacing the standard 0.028-inch-diameter bleed in the load-compensator balance line with a smaller bleed of 0.0225-inch diameter. The results of this investigation indicated that both carburetors can be easily modified to produce satisfactory acceleration characteristics of the engine and no definite choice between the types of carburetor and accelerating pump can be made. Use of the direct-metering carburetor, however, probably resulted in better fuel ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Acceleration Measurements During Landing in Rough Water of a 1/7-Scale Dynamic Model of Grumman XJR2F-1 Amphibian - Langley Tank Model 212, TED No. NACA 2378

Acceleration Measurements During Landing in Rough Water of a 1/7-Scale Dynamic Model of Grumman XJR2F-1 Amphibian - Langley Tank Model 212, TED No. NACA 2378

Date: May 6, 1947
Creator: Land, Norman S. & Zeck, Howard
Description: Tests of a 1/7 size model of the Grumman XJR2F-1 amphibian were made in Langley tank no.1 to examine the landing behavior in rough water and to measure the normal and angular accelerations experienced by the model during these landings. All landings were made normal to the direction of wave advance, a condition assumed to produce the greatest accelerations. Wave heights of 4.4 and 8.0 inches (2.5 and 4.7 ft, full size) were used in the tests and the wave lengths were varied between 10 and 50 feet (70 and 350 ft, full size). Maximum normal accelerations of about 6.5g were obtained in 4.4 inch waves and 8.5g were obtained in 8.0 inch waves. A maximum angular acceleration corresponding to 16 radians per second per second, full size, was obtained in the higher waves. The data indicate that the airplane will experience its greatest accelerations when landing in waves of about 20 feet (140 ft, full size) in length.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Acceleration Measurements During Landings of a 1/5.5-Size Dynamic Model of the Columbia XJL-1 Amphibian in Smooth Water and in Waves: Langley Tank Model 208M, TED No. NACA 2336

Acceleration Measurements During Landings of a 1/5.5-Size Dynamic Model of the Columbia XJL-1 Amphibian in Smooth Water and in Waves: Langley Tank Model 208M, TED No. NACA 2336

Date: September 25, 1947
Creator: Clement, Eugene P. & Havens, Robert F.
Description: A 1/5.5-size powered dynamic model of the Columbia XJL-1 amphibian was landed in Langley tank no. 1 in smooth water and in oncoming waves of heights from 2.1 feet to 6.4 feet (full-size) and lengths from 50 feet to 264 feet (full-size). The motions and the vertical accelerations of the model were continuously recorded. The greatest vertical acceleration measured during the smooth-water landings was 3.1g. During landings in rough water the greatest vertical acceleration measured was 15.4g, for a landing in 6.4-foot by 165-foot waves. The impact accelerations increased with increase in wave height and, in general, decreased with increase in wave length. During the landings in waves the model bounced into the air at stalled attitudes at speeds below flying speed. The model trimmed up to the mechanical trim stop (20 deg) during landings in waves of heights greater than 2.0 feet. Solid water came over the bow and damaged the propeller during one landing in 6.4-foot waves. The vertical acceleration coefficients at first impact from the tank tests of a 1/5.5-size model were in fair agreement with data obtained at the Langley impact basin during tests of a 1/2-size model of the hull.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Acceleration of high-pressure-ratio single-spool turbojet engine as determined from component performance characteristics : effect of compressor interstage air bleed

Acceleration of high-pressure-ratio single-spool turbojet engine as determined from component performance characteristics : effect of compressor interstage air bleed

Date: July 3, 1953
Creator: Rebeske, John J , Jr & Dugan, James F , Jr
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Acceleration of high-pressure-ratio single-spool turbojet engine as determined from component performance characteristics I : effect of air bleed at compressor outlet

Acceleration of high-pressure-ratio single-spool turbojet engine as determined from component performance characteristics I : effect of air bleed at compressor outlet

Date: March 10, 1953
Creator: Rebeske, John J , Jr & Rohlik, Harold E
Description: An analytical investigation was made to determine from component performance characteristics the effect of air bleed at the compressor outlet on the acceleration characteristics of a typical high-pressure-ratio single-spool turbojet engine. Consideration of several operating lines on the compressor performance map with two turbine-inlet temperatures showed that for a minimum acceleration time the turbine-inlet temperature should be the maximum allowable, and the operating line on the compressor map should be as close to the surge region as possible throughout the speed range. Operation along such a line would require a continuously varying bleed area. A relatively simple two-step area bleed gives only a small increase in acceleration time over a corresponding variable-area bleed. For the modes of operation considered, over 84 percent of the total acceleration time was required to accelerate through the low-speed range ; therefore, better low-speed compressor performance (higher pressure ratios and efficiencies) would give a significant reduction in acceleration time.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Acceleration of high-pressure-ratio single-spool turbojet engine as determined from component performance characteristics III : effect of turbine stator adjustment

Acceleration of high-pressure-ratio single-spool turbojet engine as determined from component performance characteristics III : effect of turbine stator adjustment

Date: August 2, 1954
Creator: Rohlik, Harold E & Rebeske, John J
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An acceleration schedule control for accelerating a turbojet engine and its use with a speed control

An acceleration schedule control for accelerating a turbojet engine and its use with a speed control

Date: May 12, 1958
Creator: Gerus, Theodore F; Powers, Albert G & Heppler, Herbert J
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An acceleration schedule control for accelerating a turbojet engine and its use with a speed control

An acceleration schedule control for accelerating a turbojet engine and its use with a speed control

Date: May 12, 1958
Creator: Gerus, T. F.; Heppler, H. J. & Powers, A. G.
Description: Accelerating-limiting controls for turbojet engines.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Accelerations in fighter-airplane crashes

Accelerations in fighter-airplane crashes

Date: November 4, 1957
Creator: Acker, Loren W; Black, Duglad O & Moser, Jacob C
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An active particle diffusion theory of flame quenching for laminar flames / Dorothy M. Simon and Frank E. Belles

An active particle diffusion theory of flame quenching for laminar flames / Dorothy M. Simon and Frank E. Belles

Date: March 4, 1952
Creator: Simon, Dorothy M & Belles, Frank E
Description: An equation for quenching distance based on the destruction of chain carriers by the surface is derived. The equation expresses the quenching distance in terms of the diffusion coefficients and partial pressures of the chain carriers and gas phase molecules, the efficiency of the surface as a chain breaker, the total pressure of the mixture, and a constant which depends on the geometry of the quenching surface. Quenching distances measured by flashback for propane-air flames are shown to be consistent with the mechanism. The derived equation is used with the lean inflammability limit and a rate constant calculated from burning velocity data to estimate quenching distances for propane-air (hydrocarbon lean) flames satisfactorily.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Adaptation of a Cascade Impactor to Flight Measurement of Droplet Size in Clouds

Adaptation of a Cascade Impactor to Flight Measurement of Droplet Size in Clouds

Date: September 18, 1951
Creator: Levine, Joseph & Kleinknecht, Kenneth S.
Description: A cascade impactor, an instrument for obtaining: the size distribution of droplets borne in a low-velocity air stream, was adapted for flight cloud droplet-size studies. The air containing the droplets was slowed down from flight speed by a diffuser to the inlet-air velocity of the impactor. The droplets that enter the impactor impinge on four slides coated with magnesium oxide. Each slide catches a different size range. The relation between the size of droplet impressions and the droplet size was evaluated so that the droplet-size distributions may be found from these slides. The magnesium oxide coating provides a permanent record. of the droplet impression that is not affected by droplet evaporation after the. droplets have impinged.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Adaptation of Combustion Principles to Aircraft Propulsion, Volume 2, Combustion in Air-Breathing Jet Engines

Adaptation of Combustion Principles to Aircraft Propulsion, Volume 2, Combustion in Air-Breathing Jet Engines

Date: May 2, 1956
Creator: unknown
Description: This volume continues the NACA study of combustion principles for aircraft propulsion. The various aspects of combustion pertinent to jet engines are organized and interpreted with quite extensive information, particularly for basic or fundamental. subject matter. The report concerns only air-breathing engines and hydrocarbon fuels, and not rocket engines and high-energy fuels. Since the references have been selected to illustrate important points, the bibliographies, while thorough, are not complete. This volumes describes the observed performance and design problems of engine combustors of the principal types. These include combustor-inlet conditions; starting, acceleration, combustion limits, combustion efficiency, coke deposits, and smoke formation in turbojets; ram-jet performance; and afterburner performance and design.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Adaptation of Combustion Principles to Aircraft Propulsion, Volume I, Basic Considerations in the Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels with Air

Adaptation of Combustion Principles to Aircraft Propulsion, Volume I, Basic Considerations in the Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels with Air

Date: April 1, 1955
Creator: Barnett, Henry C. & Hibbard, Robert R.
Description: The report summarizes source material on combustion for flight-propulsion engineers. First, several chapters review fundamental processes such as fuel-air mixture preparation, gas flow and mixing, flammability and ignition, flame propagation in both homogenous and heterogenous media, flame stabilization, combustion oscillations, and smoke and carbon formation. The practical significance and the relation of these processes to theory are presented. A second series of chapters describes the observed performance and design problems of engine combustors of the principal types. An attempt is made to interpret performance in terms of the fundamental processes and theories previously reviewed. Third, the design of high-speed combustion systems is discussed. Combustor design principles that can be established from basic considerations and from experience with actual combustors are described. Finally, future requirements for aircraft engine combustion systems are examined.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Additional abstracts pertaining to seaplanes

Additional abstracts pertaining to seaplanes

Date: March 9, 1948
Creator: Bidwell, J. M. & King, D. A.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Additional comparisons between computed and measured transonic drag-rise coefficients at zero lift for wing-body-tail configurations

Additional comparisons between computed and measured transonic drag-rise coefficients at zero lift for wing-body-tail configurations

Date: August 15, 1955
Creator: Holdaway, George H
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Additional experimental heat-transfer and durability data on several forced-convection, air-cooled, strut-supported turbine blades of improved design

Additional experimental heat-transfer and durability data on several forced-convection, air-cooled, strut-supported turbine blades of improved design

Date: January 19, 1955
Creator: Schum, Eugene F
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Additional experiments with flat-top wing- body combinations at high supersonic speeds

Additional experiments with flat-top wing- body combinations at high supersonic speeds

Date: February 19, 1957
Creator: Gloria, H. R.; Syvertson, C. A. & Wong, T. J.
Description: Flat top wing body configuration effects on aerodynamic characteristics of supersonic aircraft.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Additional fatigue tests on effects of design details in 355-T6 sand-cast aluminum alloy

Additional fatigue tests on effects of design details in 355-T6 sand-cast aluminum alloy

Date: March 10, 1954
Creator: Eaton, I D & Youra, John A
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Additional free-flight tests of the rolling effectiveness of several wing-spoiler arrangements at high subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds

Additional free-flight tests of the rolling effectiveness of several wing-spoiler arrangements at high subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds

Date: November 24, 1948
Creator: Strass, H Kurt
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Additional measurements of the low-speed static stability of a configuration employing three triangular wing panels and a body of equal length

Additional measurements of the low-speed static stability of a configuration employing three triangular wing panels and a body of equal length

Date: July 25, 1955
Creator: Delany, Noel K
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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