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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Advanced Restricted Report
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Aerodynamic and hydrodynamic tests of a family of models of flying-boat hulls derived from a streamline body : NACA model 84 series
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61711/
Aerodynamic tests of a full-scale TBF-1 aileron installation in the Langley 16-foot high-speed tunnel
The failure of wing panels on a number of TBF-1 and TBM-1 airplanes in flight has prompted several investigations of the possible causes of failure. This report describes tests in the Langley 16-foot high-speed tunnel to determine whether these failures could be attributed to changes in the aerodynamic characteristics of the ailerons at high speeds. The tests were made of a 12-foot-span section including the tip and aileron of the right wing of a TBF-1 airplane. Hinge moments, control-link stresses due to aerodynamic buffeting, and fabric-deflection photographs were obtained at true airspeeds ranging from 110 to 365 miles per hour. The aileron hinge-moment coefficients were found to vary only slightly with airspeed in spite of the large fabric deflections that developed as the speed was increased. An analysis of these results indicated that the resultant hinge moment of the ailerons as installed in the airplane would tend to restore the ailerons to their neutral position for all the high-speed flight conditions covered in the tests. Serious aerodynamic buffeting occurred at up aileron angles of -10 degrees or greater because of stalling of the sharp projecting lip of the Frise aileron. The peak stresses set up in the aileron control linkages in the buffeting condition were as high as three times the mean stress. During the hinge-moment investigation, flutter of the test installation occurred at airspeeds of about 150 miles per hour. This flutter condition was investigated in some detail and slow-motion pictures were made of the motion of the wing tip and aileron. The flutter was found to involve simultaneous normal bending and chordwise oscillation of the wing and flapping of the aileron. The aileron motion appeared to be coupled with this flutter condition and was investigated in some detail and slow-motion pictures were made of the motion of the wing tip and aileron. The flutter was found to involve simultaneous normal bending and chordwise oscillation of the wing and flapping of the aileron. The aileron motion appeared to be coupled with the motion of the wing through the mass unbalance of the aileron in the normal-to-chord plane due to location of the hinge line 2.17 inches below the center of gravity of the aileron. Flutter did not occur when the installation was stiffened to prevent chordwise motion or when the bending frequency of the aileron system was appreciably higher than that of the wing as in the complete airplane installation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65423/
Air-consumption parameters for automatic mixture control of aircraft engines
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279682/
Airfoil-contour modifications based on (epsilon)-curve method of calculating pressure distribution
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61280/
Airspeed fluctuations as a measure of atmospheric turbulence
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61123/
Analysis of a thermal ice-prevention system for wing leading-edge landing-light installations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62479/
Analysis of factors affecting net lift increment attainable with trailing-edge split flaps on tailless airplanes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61281/
An analysis of life expectancy of airplane wings in normal cruising flight
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62527/
An analysis of the skipping characteristics of some full-size flying boats
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60904/
Analysis of wind-tunnel stability and control tests in terms of flying qualities in full-scale airplanes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279513/
Application of a numerical procedure to stress analysis of stringer-reinforced panels
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60971/
The application of data on strength under repeated stresses to the design of aircraft
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60883/
Application of spring tabs to elevator controls
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279509/
Application of the method of least squares to engine-cooling analysis
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61940/
Artificial running-in of piston rings
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61987/
Bending and shear stresses developed by the instantaneous arrest of the root of a cantilever beam rotating with constant angular velocity about a transverse axis through the root
A theoretical investigation was made of the behavior of a cantilever beam in rotational motion about a transverse axis through the root determining the stresses, the deflections, and the accelerations that occur in the beam as a result of the arrest of motion. The equations for bending and shear stress reveal that, at a given percentage of the distance from root to tip and at a given trip velocity, the bending stresses for a particular mode are independent of the length of the beam and the shear stresses vary inversely with the length. When examined with respect to a given angular velocity instead of a given tip velocity, the equations reveal that the bending stress is proportional to the length of the beam whereas the shear stress is independent of the length. Sufficient experimental verification of the theory has previously been given in connection with another problem of the same type. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63067/
Bending and shear stresses developed by the instantaneous arrest of the root of a moving cantilever beam
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62213/
Breaking aircraft-engine oil foams by use of electrically charged condenser plates
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62325/
Calculations of economy of 18-cylinder radial aircraft engine with exhaust-gas turbine geared to the crankshaft at cruising speed
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279432/
Calculations of the Performance of a Compression-Ignition Engine-Compressor Turbine Combination I : Performance of a Highly Supercharged Compression-Ignition Engine
Small high-speed single-cylinder compression-ignition engines were tested to determine their performance characteristics under high supercharging. Calculations were made on the energy available in the exhaust gas of the compression-ignition engines. The maximum power at any given maximum cylinder pressure was obtained when the compression pressure was equal to the maximum cylinder pressure. Constant-pressure combustion was found possible at an engine speed of 2200 rpm. Exhaust pressures and temperatures were determined from an analysis of indicator cards. The analysis showed that, at rich mixtures with the exhaust back pressure equal to the inlet-air pressure, there is excess energy available for driving a turbine over that required for supercharging. The presence of this excess energy indicates that a highly supercharged compression-ignition engine might be desirable as a compressor and combustion chamber for a turbine. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62108/
Charts for calculation of the critical compressive stress for local instability of idealized web- and T-stiffened panels
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61300/
Charts for calculation of the critical stress for local instability of columns with I-, Z-, channel and rectangular-tube section
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62206/
Charts for critical combinations of longitudinal and transverse direct stress for flat rectangular plates
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62218/
Charts for determining jet-boundary corrections for complete models in 7- by 10-foot closed rectangular wind tunnels
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61182/
Charts for the minimum-weight design of 24S-T aluminum-alloy flat compression panels with longitudinal Z-section stiffeners
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60911/
Column and plate compressive strengths of aircraft structural materials : 17S-T aluminum-alloy sheet
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62233/
Column and Plate Compressive Strengths of Aircraft Structural Materials: 24S-T Aluminum-alloy Sheet
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62255/
Column and plate compressive strengths of aircraft structural materials : extruded 14S-T aluminum alloy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62232/
Column and plate compressive strengths of aircraft structural materials : extruded 24S-T aluminum alloy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62256/
Column and Plate Compressive Strengths of Aircraft Structural Materials: Extruded 24S-T Aluminum Alloy
Column and plate compressive strengths of extruded 24S-T aluminum alloy were determined both within and beyond the elastic range from tests of thin-strip columns and local-instability tests of H-, Z-,and channel-section columns. These tests are part of an extensive research investigation to provide data on the' structural strength of various aircraft materials. The results are presented in the form of curves and charts that are suitable for use in the design and analysis of aircraft structures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64990/
Column and plate compressive strengths of aircraft structural materials : extruded 75S-T aluminum alloy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62258/
Column and plate compressive strengths of aircraft structural materials : extruded R303-T aluminum alloy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62260/
Comparative cooling of cylinders of nonuniform fin width with tight-fitting baffles and with baffles that provide constant flow-path areas
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61906/
A comparative study of the effect of wing flutter shape on the critical flutter speed
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61272/
Comparison between calculated and measured loads on wing and horizontal tail in pull-up maneuvers
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60868/
Comparison of an approximate and an exact method of shear-lag analysis
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61299/
A comparison of analytically and experimentally determined isothermal pressure losses in a heat-exchanger installation
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62492/
Comparison of tail and wing-tip spin-recovery parachutes as determined by tests in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61236/
A comparison of the effects of four-blade dual- and single-rotation propellers on the stability and control characteristics of a high-powered single-engine airplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61064/
A comparison of two flight-test procedures for the determination of aileron control capabilities of an airplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61622/
Comparison of Wind-Tunnel and Flight Measurements of Stability and Control Characteristics of a Douglas A-26 Airplane
Tests in Langley pressure tunnel of model XA-26 bomber were compared with those of A-26B (twin-engine attack bomber) and showed that static longitudinal stability, indicated by elevator-fixed neutral points, and variation of elevator deflection in straight and turning flight were good. Airplane possessed improved stability at low speeds which was attributed to pronounced stalling at root of production wing. At rudder-force reversal at speeds higher than those in flight tests, agreement in rudder-fixed and rudder-free static directional stability was good. Hinge moment obtained at zero sideslip was satisfactory for determining aileron forces in sideslip. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61049/
Comparisons of methods of computing bending moments in helicopter rotor blades in the plane of flapping
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61840/
Compressibility and heating effects on pressure loss and cooling of a baffled cylinder barrel
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279452/
Compressibility Effects on Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Smooth Cylindrical Tubes
An analysis is made to simplify pressure-drop calculations for nonadiabatic and adiabatic friction flow of air in smooth cylindrical tubes when the density changes due to heat transfer and pressure drop are appreciable. Solutions of the equation of motion are obtained by the use of Reynolds' analogy between heat transfer and skin friction. Charts of the solutions are presented for making pressure-drop calculations. A technique of using the charts to determine the position of a normal shock in a tube is described. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62449/
Compressible potential flow with circulation about a circular cylinder
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279487/
Compressive Strength of Flat Panels with Z- and Hat-Section Stiffeners
Compression tests were conducted on 247 panels with Z-section stiffeners and 304 panels with hat-section stiffeners. Specimens were constructed from artificially aged Alclad 24S aluminum alloy with minimum guaranteed yield strengths of 64 and 57 ksi for stiffeners and sheet materials, respectively. Height, thickness, and spacing of stiffeners, sheet thickness, and length of specimens were varied systematically to show effects of changes in these dimensions on panel strength. Results show average stresses at buckling load and maximum load. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60958/
Compressive strength of flat panels with Z-section stiffeners
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60979/
The conformal transformation of an airfoil into a straight line and its application to the inverse problem of airfoil theory
A method of conformal transformation is developed that maps an airfoil into a straight line, the line being chosen as the extended chord line of the airfoil. The mapping is accomplished by operating directly with the airfoil ordinates. The absence of any preliminary transformation is found to shorten the work substantially over that of previous methods. Use is made of the superposition of solutions to obtain a rigorous counterpart of the approximate methods of thin-airfoils theory. The method is applied to the solution of the direct and inverse problems for arbitrary airfoils and pressure distributions. Numerical examples are given. Applications to more general types of regions, in particular to biplanes and to cascades of airfoils, are indicated. (author). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65421/
Construction of wire strain gages for engine application
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62424/
Continuous use of internal cooling to suppress knock in aircraft engines cruising at high power
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61998/
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