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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Year: 1932
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Notes
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
The aerodynamic characteristics of a model wing having a split flap deflected downward and moved to the rear

The aerodynamic characteristics of a model wing having a split flap deflected downward and moved to the rear

Date: May 1, 1932
Creator: Weick, Fred E
Description: Tests were made on a model wing with three different sized split trailing-edged flaps, in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel. The flaps were formed of the lower rear portion of the wing and were rotated downward about axes at their front edges. The lift, drag, and center of pressure were measured with the axis in its original position and also with it moved back in even steps to the trailing edge of the main wing, giving in effect an increase in area. The split flaps when deflected about their original axis locations gave slightly higher maximum lift coefficients than conventional trailing-edge flaps, and the lift coefficients were increased still further by moving the axes toward the rear. The highest value of C(sub L max), which was obtained with the largest flap hinged at 90 per cent of the chord from the leading edge, was 2.52 as compared with 1.27 for the basic wing.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils at negative angles of attack

The aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils at negative angles of attack

Date: March 1, 1932
Creator: Anderson, Raymond F
Description: A number of airfoils, including 14 commonly used airfoils and 10 NACA airfoils, were tested through the negative angle-of-attack range in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel at a Reynolds Number of approximately 3,000,000. The tests were made to supply data to serve as a basis for the structural design of airplanes in the inverted flight condition. In order to make the results immediately available for this purpose they are presented herein in preliminary form, together with results of previous tests of the airfoils at positive angles of attack. An analysis of the results made to find the variation of the ratio of the maximum negative lift coefficient to the maximum positive lift coefficient led to the following conclusions: 1) For airfoils of a given thickness, the ratio -C(sub L max) / +C(sub L max) tends to decrease as the mean camber is increased. 2) For airfoils of a given mean camber, the ratio -C(sub L max) / +C(sub L max) tends to increase as the thickness increases.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Characteristics of an airfoil as affected by fabric sag

Characteristics of an airfoil as affected by fabric sag

Date: August 1, 1932
Creator: Ward, Kenneth E
Description: This report presents the results of tests made at a high value of the Reynolds Number in the N.A.C.A. variable-density wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil as affected by fabric sag. Tests were made of two Gottingen 387 airfoils, one having the usual smooth surface and the other having a surface modified to simulate two types of fabric sag. The results of these tests indicate that the usual sagging of the wind covering between ribs has a very small effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil.
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Characteristics of two sharp-nosed airfoils having reduced spinning tendencies

Characteristics of two sharp-nosed airfoils having reduced spinning tendencies

Date: April 1, 1932
Creator: Jacobs, Eastman N
Description: According to Mr. L.D. Bell, of the Consolidated Aircraft Corporation, certain undesirable spinning characteristics of a commercial airplane were eliminated by the addition of a filler to the forward part of the wing to give it a sharp leading edge. To ascertain what aerodynamic effects result from such a change of section, two airfoils having sharp leading edges were tested in the variable-density wind tunnel. Both sections were derived by modifying the Gott. 398. The tests, which were made at a large value of the Reynolds Number, were carried to very large angles of attack to provide data for application to flight at angles of attack well beyond the stall. The characteristics of the sharp-nosed airfoils are compared with those of the normal Gott. 398 airfoil. Both of the sharp-nosed airfoils, which differ in the angle between the upper and lower surfaces at the leading edge, have about the same characteristics. As compared with the normal airfoil, the maximum lift is reduced by approximately 26 per cent, but the objectionable rapidly decreasing lift with angle of attack beyond the stall is eliminated; the profile drag of the section is slightly reduced in the range of the lift coefficient between 0.2 ...
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Comparative performance of a Powerplus vane-type supercharger and an N.A.C.A. Roots-type supercharger

Comparative performance of a Powerplus vane-type supercharger and an N.A.C.A. Roots-type supercharger

Date: July 1, 1932
Creator: Schey, Oscar W
Description: This report presents the results of tests of a Power plus supercharger and a comparison of its performance with the performance previously obtained with an N.A.C.A. Roots-type supercharger. The Powerplus supercharger is a positive displacement blower of the vane type having mechanically operated vanes, the movement of which is controlled by slots and eccentrics. The supercharger was tested at a range of pressure differences from 0 to 15 inches of mercury and at speeds from 500 to 2,500 r.p.m. The pressure difference across the supercharger was obtained by throttling the intake of a depression tank which was interposed in the air duct between the supercharger and the Durley orifice box used for measuring the air. The results of these tests show that at low pressure differences and at all speeds the power required by the Powerplus supercharger to compress a definite quantity of air per second is considerably higher than that required by the Roots. At pressure differences from 10 to 14 inches of mercury and at speeds over 2,000 r.p.m. the power requirements of the two superchargers are practically the same. At a pressure difference of 15 inches of mercury or greater and at a speed of 2,500 r.p.m. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Compression-ignition engine tests of several fuels

Compression-ignition engine tests of several fuels

Date: May 1, 1932
Creator: Spanogle, J A
Description: The tests reported in this paper were made to devise simple engine tests which would rate fuels as to their comparative value and their suitability for the operating conditions of the individual engine on which the tests are made. Three commercial fuels were used in two test engines having combustion chambers with and without effective air flow. Strictly comparative performance tests gave almost identical results for the three fuels. Analysis of indicator cards allowed a differentiation between fuels on a basis of rates of combustion. The same comparative ratings were obtained by determining the consistent operating range of injection advance angle for the three fuels. The difference in fuels is more pronounced in a quiescent combustion chamber than in one with high-velocity air flow. A fuel is considered suitable for the operating conditions of an engine with a quiescent combustion chamber if it permits the injection of the fuel to be advanced beyond the optimum without exceeding allowable knock or allowable maximum cylinder pressures.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The compressive strength of duralumin columns of equal angle section

The compressive strength of duralumin columns of equal angle section

Date: March 1, 1932
Creator: Lundquist, Eugene E
Description: This report presents a chart giving the compressive strength of duralumin columns of equal angle section. The data used in the construction of the chart were obtained from various published sources and were correlated with theory in the range where secondary failure occurred. Appendices are included giving excerpts from Army and Navy specifications for duralumin and approximate formulas for the properties of the equal angle section.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Considerations of air flow in combustion chambers of high-speed compression-ignition engines

Considerations of air flow in combustion chambers of high-speed compression-ignition engines

Date: April 1, 1932
Creator: Spanogle, J A
Description: The air flow in combustion chambers is divided into three fundamental classes - induced, forced, and residual. A generalized resume is given of the present status of air flow investigations and of the work done at this and other laboratories to determine the direction and velocity of air movement in auxiliary and integral combustion chambers. The effects of air flow on engine performance are mentioned to show that although air flow improves the combustion efficiency, considerable induction, friction, and thermal losses must be guarded against.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Drag tests of 4/9-scale model engine nacelles with various cowlings

Drag tests of 4/9-scale model engine nacelles with various cowlings

Date: October 1, 1932
Creator: Windler, Ray
Description: Results are given of drag tests of 4/9-scale model radial air-cooled engine nacelles made as a part of a general investigation of wing-nacelle-propeller interference. A small nacelle of the type commonly used with exposed engine cylinders was tested with various forms of cowling over the cylinders. The effects of cowling-ring position and of angle of ring chord to the thrust line were investigated. An N.A.C.A. cowled nacelle and a smooth body were also tested. The results are given at 50, 75, and 100 miles per hour for -5 degrees, 0 degrees, 5 degrees, 10 degrees, 15 degrees angle of pitch.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effect of aging on taut rubber diaphragms

Effect of aging on taut rubber diaphragms

Date: February 1, 1932
Creator: Henrickson, H B
Description: As part of an investigation of special compositions of rubber suitable for use as diaphragms for aircraft instruments, six samples were used as taut diaphragms in instruments and allowed to age for five years. Two of the instruments were in operating condition after this period of time and one had remarkably little change in performance. In making the rubber tetraethyl thorium disulfide was employed as a vulcanizing agent.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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