You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Year: 1932
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Notes
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
The aerodynamic characteristics of a model wing having a split flap deflected downward and moved to the rear

The aerodynamic characteristics of a model wing having a split flap deflected downward and moved to the rear

Date: May 1932
Creator: Weick, Fred E & Harris, Thomas E
Description: Tests were made on a model wing with three different sized split trailing-edged flaps, in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel. The flaps were formed of the lower rear portion of the wing and were rotated downward about axes at their front edges. The lift, drag, and center of pressure were measured with the axis in its original position and also with it moved back in even steps to the trailing edge of the main wing, giving in effect an increase in area. The split flaps when deflected about their original axis locations gave slightly higher maximum lift coefficients than conventional trailing-edge flaps, and the lift coefficients were increased still further by moving the axes toward the rear. The highest value of C(sub L max), which was obtained with the largest flap hinged at 90 per cent of the chord from the leading edge, was 2.52 as compared with 1.27 for the basic wing.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils at negative angles of attack

The aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils at negative angles of attack

Date: 1932~
Creator: Anderson, Raymond F
Description: A number of airfoils, including 14 commonly used airfoils and 10 NACA airfoils, were tested through the negative angle-of-attack range in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel at a Reynolds Number of approximately 3,000,000. The tests were made to supply data to serve as a basis for the structural design of airplanes in the inverted flight condition. In order to make the results immediately available for this purpose they are presented herein in preliminary form, together with results of previous tests of the airfoils at positive angles of attack. An analysis of the results made to find the variation of the ratio of the maximum negative lift coefficient to the maximum positive lift coefficient led to the following conclusions: 1) For airfoils of a given thickness, the ratio -C(sub L max) / +C(sub L max) tends to decrease as the mean camber is increased. 2) For airfoils of a given mean camber, the ratio -C(sub L max) / +C(sub L max) tends to increase as the thickness increases.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Characteristics of an airfoil as affected by fabric sag

Characteristics of an airfoil as affected by fabric sag

Date: August 1, 1932
Creator: Ward, Kenneth E
Description: This report presents the results of tests made at a high value of the Reynolds Number in the N.A.C.A. variable-density wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil as affected by fabric sag. Tests were made of two Gottingen 387 airfoils, one having the usual smooth surface and the other having a surface modified to simulate two types of fabric sag. The results of these tests indicate that the usual sagging of the wind covering between ribs has a very small effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Characteristics of two sharp-nosed airfoils having reduced spinning tendencies

Characteristics of two sharp-nosed airfoils having reduced spinning tendencies

Date: April 1, 1932
Creator: Jacobs, Eastman N
Description: According to Mr. L.D. Bell, of the Consolidated Aircraft Corporation, certain undesirable spinning characteristics of a commercial airplane were eliminated by the addition of a filler to the forward part of the wing to give it a sharp leading edge. To ascertain what aerodynamic effects result from such a change of section, two airfoils having sharp leading edges were tested in the variable-density wind tunnel. Both sections were derived by modifying the Gott. 398. The tests, which were made at a large value of the Reynolds Number, were carried to very large angles of attack to provide data for application to flight at angles of attack well beyond the stall. The characteristics of the sharp-nosed airfoils are compared with those of the normal Gott. 398 airfoil. Both of the sharp-nosed airfoils, which differ in the angle between the upper and lower surfaces at the leading edge, have about the same characteristics. As compared with the normal airfoil, the maximum lift is reduced by approximately 26 per cent, but the objectionable rapidly decreasing lift with angle of attack beyond the stall is eliminated; the profile drag of the section is slightly reduced in the range of the lift coefficient between 0.2 ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Comparative performance of a Powerplus vane-type supercharger and an N.A.C.A. Roots-type supercharger

Comparative performance of a Powerplus vane-type supercharger and an N.A.C.A. Roots-type supercharger

Date: July 1, 1932
Creator: Schey, Oscar W & Ellerbrock, Herman H , R
Description: This report presents the results of tests of a Power plus supercharger and a comparison of its performance with the performance previously obtained with an N.A.C.A. Roots-type supercharger. The Powerplus supercharger is a positive displacement blower of the vane type having mechanically operated vanes, the movement of which is controlled by slots and eccentrics. The supercharger was tested at a range of pressure differences from 0 to 15 inches of mercury and at speeds from 500 to 2,500 r.p.m. The pressure difference across the supercharger was obtained by throttling the intake of a depression tank which was interposed in the air duct between the supercharger and the Durley orifice box used for measuring the air. The results of these tests show that at low pressure differences and at all speeds the power required by the Powerplus supercharger to compress a definite quantity of air per second is considerably higher than that required by the Roots. At pressure differences from 10 to 14 inches of mercury and at speeds over 2,000 r.p.m. the power requirements of the two superchargers are practically the same. At a pressure difference of 15 inches of mercury or greater and at a speed of 2,500 r.p.m. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Compression-ignition engine tests of several fuels

Compression-ignition engine tests of several fuels

Date: May 1, 1932
Creator: Spanogle, J A
Description: The tests reported in this paper were made to devise simple engine tests which would rate fuels as to their comparative value and their suitability for the operating conditions of the individual engine on which the tests are made. Three commercial fuels were used in two test engines having combustion chambers with and without effective air flow. Strictly comparative performance tests gave almost identical results for the three fuels. Analysis of indicator cards allowed a differentiation between fuels on a basis of rates of combustion. The same comparative ratings were obtained by determining the consistent operating range of injection advance angle for the three fuels. The difference in fuels is more pronounced in a quiescent combustion chamber than in one with high-velocity air flow. A fuel is considered suitable for the operating conditions of an engine with a quiescent combustion chamber if it permits the injection of the fuel to be advanced beyond the optimum without exceeding allowable knock or allowable maximum cylinder pressures.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The compressive strength of duralumin columns of equal angle section

The compressive strength of duralumin columns of equal angle section

Date: March 1, 1932
Creator: Lundquist, Eugene E
Description: This report presents a chart giving the compressive strength of duralumin columns of equal angle section. The data used in the construction of the chart were obtained from various published sources and were correlated with theory in the range where secondary failure occurred. Appendices are included giving excerpts from Army and Navy specifications for duralumin and approximate formulas for the properties of the equal angle section.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Considerations of air flow in combustion chambers of high-speed compression-ignition engines

Considerations of air flow in combustion chambers of high-speed compression-ignition engines

Date: April 1, 1932
Creator: Spanogle, J A & Moore, C S
Description: The air flow in combustion chambers is divided into three fundamental classes - induced, forced, and residual. A generalized resume is given of the present status of air flow investigations and of the work done at this and other laboratories to determine the direction and velocity of air movement in auxiliary and integral combustion chambers. The effects of air flow on engine performance are mentioned to show that although air flow improves the combustion efficiency, considerable induction, friction, and thermal losses must be guarded against.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Drag tests of 4/9-scale model engine nacelles with various cowlings

Drag tests of 4/9-scale model engine nacelles with various cowlings

Date: October 1, 1932
Creator: Windler, Ray
Description: Results are given of drag tests of 4/9-scale model radial air-cooled engine nacelles made as a part of a general investigation of wing-nacelle-propeller interference. A small nacelle of the type commonly used with exposed engine cylinders was tested with various forms of cowling over the cylinders. The effects of cowling-ring position and of angle of ring chord to the thrust line were investigated. An N.A.C.A. cowled nacelle and a smooth body were also tested. The results are given at 50, 75, and 100 miles per hour for -5 degrees, 0 degrees, 5 degrees, 10 degrees, 15 degrees angle of pitch.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effect of aging on taut rubber diaphragms

Effect of aging on taut rubber diaphragms

Date: February 1, 1932
Creator: Henrickson, H B & Strother, D H
Description: As part of an investigation of special compositions of rubber suitable for use as diaphragms for aircraft instruments, six samples were used as taut diaphragms in instruments and allowed to age for five years. Two of the instruments were in operating condition after this period of time and one had remarkably little change in performance. In making the rubber tetraethyl thorium disulfide was employed as a vulcanizing agent.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Effect of Clearance Distribution on the Performance of a Compression-Ignition Engine with a Precombustion Chamber

The Effect of Clearance Distribution on the Performance of a Compression-Ignition Engine with a Precombustion Chamber

Date: November 1, 1932
Creator: Moore, C. S. & Collins, J. H. Jr
Description: The clearance distribution in a precombustion chamber cylinder head was varied so that for a constant compression ratio of 13.5 the spherical auxiliary chambers contained 20, 35, 50, and 70 per cent of the total clearance volume. Each chamber was connected to the cylinder by a single circular passage, flared at both ends, and of a cross-sectional area proportional to the chamber volume, thereby giving the same calculated air-flow velocity through each passage. Results of engine-performance tests are presented with variations of power, fuel consumption, explosion pressure, rate of pressure rise, ignition lag, heat loss to the cooling water, and motoring characteristics. For good performance the minimum auxiliary chamber volume, with the cylinder head design used, was 35 per cent of the total clearance volume; for larger volumes the performance improves but slightly. With the auxiliary chamber that contained 35 percent of the clearance volume there were obtained the lowest explosion pressures, medium rates of pressure rise, and slightly less than the maximum power. For all clearance distributions an increase in engine speed decreased the ignition lag in seconds and increased the rate of pressure rise.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The effect of connecting-passage diameter on the performance of a compression-ignition engine with a precombustion chamber

The effect of connecting-passage diameter on the performance of a compression-ignition engine with a precombustion chamber

Date: November 1, 1932
Creator: Moore, C S & Collins, J H
Description: Results of motoring tests are presented showing the effect of passage diameter on chamber and cylinder compression pressures, maximum pressure differences, and f.m.e.p. over a speed range from 300 to 1,750 r.p.m. Results of engine performance tests are presented which show the effect of passage diameter on m.e.p., explosion pressures, specific fuel consumption, and rates of pressure rise for a range of engine speeds from 500 to 1,500 r.p.m. The cylinder compression pressure, the maximum pressure difference, and the f.m.e.p. decreased rapidly as the passage diameter increased to 29/64 inch, whereas further increase in passage diameter effected only a slight change. The most suitable passage diameter for good engine performance and operating characteristics was 29/64 inch. Passage diameter became less critical with a decrease in engine speed. Therefore, the design should be based on maximum operating speed. Optimum performance and satisfactory combustion control could not be obtained by means of any single diameter of the connecting passage.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effect of engine operating conditions on the vaporization of safety fuels

Effect of engine operating conditions on the vaporization of safety fuels

Date: August 1, 1932
Creator: Rothrock, A M & Waldron, C D
Description: Tests were conducted with the N.A.C.A. combustion apparatus to determine the effect of compression ratio and engine temperature on the vaporization of a hydrogenated "safety fuel" during the compression stroke under conditions similar to those in a spark-ignition engine. The effects of fuel boiling temperature on vaporization using gasoline, safety fuel, and Diesel fuel oil was also investigated. The results show that increasing the compression ratio has little effect on the rate of fuel vaporization, but that increasing the air temperature by increasing the engine temperature increases the rate of fuel vaporization. The results also show that the vaporized fuel forms a homogeneous mixture with the air more rapidly that does the atomized fuel spray.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effect of length of Handley Page tip slots on the lateral-stability factor, damping in roll

Effect of length of Handley Page tip slots on the lateral-stability factor, damping in roll

Date: July 1, 1932
Creator: Weick, Fred E & Wenzinger, Carl J
Description: Tests have been made in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel on a Clark Y wing model equipped with various lengths of Handley Page slots extending inward from the wing tips. The slot lengths tested ranged from 20 to 100 per cent of the semi span. The effect of slot lengths on damping in roll was determined by means of both free-autorotation and forced-rotation test. In addition, the maximum lift coefficient was found with each slot length. The optimum length of slot for satisfactory damping in roll over a large range of angles of attack was found to be slightly over 50 per cent of the semispan for the form of slot tested.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The effect of propellers and nacelles on the landing speeds of tractor monoplanes

The effect of propellers and nacelles on the landing speeds of tractor monoplanes

Date: May 1, 1932
Creator: Windler, Ray
Description: This paper reports wind-tunnel tests giving the lift coefficients of large-scale wing-nacelle combinations both with and without the propeller. The tests were made to show the effect of nacelles, and idling and stopped propellers on the landing speeds of tractor monoplanes. Four types of nacelles with various cowlings were used in numerous positions with respect to both a Clark Y and a thick airfoil. The effect of both the idling and stopped propeller on lift, and consequently on landing speed, was negligible. A nacelle with exposed engine cylinders when placed directly in front of an airfoil caused a slight reduction in lift, consequently an increase in landing speed, over the condition with the wing alone. With this exception no appreciable effect on landing speed was indicated for any of the other combinations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effect of the reservoir volume on the discharge pressures in the injection system of the N.A.C.A. spray photography equipment

Effect of the reservoir volume on the discharge pressures in the injection system of the N.A.C.A. spray photography equipment

Date: February 1, 1932
Creator: Rothrock, A M & Lee, D W
Description: Tests were made to determine the effect of the reservoir volume on the discharge pressures in the injection system of the N.A.C.A. spray photography equipment. The data obtained are applicable to the design of a common rail fuel-injection system. The data show that an injection system of the type described can be designed so that not more than full load fuel quantity can be injected into the engine cylinders, and so that the fuel spray characteristics remain constant over a large range of engine speeds. Formulas are presented for computing the volume of the reservoir and the diameter of the discharge orifice.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experiments on the distribution of fuel in fuel sprays

Experiments on the distribution of fuel in fuel sprays

Date: March 1, 1932
Creator: Lee, Dana W
Description: The distribution of the fuel in sprays for compression-ignition engines was investigated by taking high-speed spark photographs of fuel sprays produced under a wide variety of conditions, and also by injecting them against pieces of Plasticine. A photographic study was made of sprays injected into evacuated chambers, into the atmosphere, into compressed air, and into transparent liquids. Pairs of identical sprays were injected counter to each other and their behavior analyzed. Small high-velocity air jets were directed normally to the axes of fuel sprays, with the result that the envelope of spray which usually obscures the core was blown aside, leaving the core exposed on one side.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Flight tests to determine the effect of a fixed auxiliary airfoil on the lift and drag of a parasol monoplane

Flight tests to determine the effect of a fixed auxiliary airfoil on the lift and drag of a parasol monoplane

Date: December 1, 1932
Creator: Soule, Hartley A
Description: Comparative flight tests were made with a small parasol monoplane in which the aerodynamic characteristics of the airplane were determined with the normal wing and with an auxiliary airfoil installed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The gaseous explosive reaction at constant pressure : further data on the effect of inert gases

The gaseous explosive reaction at constant pressure : further data on the effect of inert gases

Date: December 1, 1932
Creator: Stevens, F W
Description: An investigation of gaseous explosive reactions is discussed in this report. Measurements were taken to calculate the maximum flame temperature attained and making correlations with existing thermal data on this reaction.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Heat dissipation from a finned cylinder at different fin-plane/air-stream angles

Heat dissipation from a finned cylinder at different fin-plane/air-stream angles

Date: August 1, 1932
Creator: Schey, Oscar W & Biermann, Arnold E
Description: This report gives the results of an experimental determination of the temperature distribution in and the heat dissipation from a cylindrical finned surface for various fin-plane/air-stream angles. A steel cylinder 4.5 inches in diameter having slightly tapered fins of 0.30-inch pitch and 0.6 -inch width was equipped with an electrical heating unit furnishing 13 to 248 B.T.U. per hour per square inch of inside wall area. Air at speeds form 30 to 150 miles per hour was directed at seven different angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees with respect to the fin planes. The tests show the best angle for cooling at all air speeds to be about 45 degrees. With the same temperature for the two conditions and with an air speed of 76 miles per hour, the heat input to the cylinder can be increased 50 percent at 45 degrees fin-plane/air-stream angle over that at 0 degrees.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Influence of several factors on ignition lag in a compression-ignition engine

Influence of several factors on ignition lag in a compression-ignition engine

Date: November 1, 1932
Creator: Gerrish, Harold C & Voss, Fred
Description: This investigation was made to determine the influence of fuel quality, injection advance angle, injection valve-opening pressure, inlet-air pressure, compression ratio, and engine speed on the time lag of auto-ignition of a Diesel fuel oil in a single-cylinder compression-ignition engine as obtained from an analysis of indicator diagrams. Three cam-operated fuel-injection pumps, two pumps cams, and an automatic injection valve with two different nozzles were used. Ignition lag was considered to be the interval between the start of injection of the fuel as determined with a Stroborama and the start of effective combustion as determined from the indicator diagram, the latter being the point where 4.0 x 10(exp-6) pound of fuel had been effectively burned. For this particular engine and fuel it was found that: (1) for a constant start and the same rate of fuel injection up the point of cut-off, a variation in fuel quantity from 1.2 x 10(exp-4) to 4.1 x 10(exp-4) pound per cycle has no appreciable effect on the ignition lag; (2) injection advance angle increases or decreases the lag according to whether density, temperature, or turbulence has the controlling influence; (3) increase in valve-opening pressure slightly increases the lag; and (4) increase of inlet-air ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Meteorological conditions during the formation of ice on aircraft

Meteorological conditions during the formation of ice on aircraft

Date: December 1, 1932
Creator: Samuels, L T
Description: These are the results of a number of records recently secured from autographic meteorological instruments mounted on airplanes at times when ice formed. Ice is found to collect on an airplane only when the airplane is in some form of visible moisture, such as cloud, fog, mist, rain. etc., and the air temperature is within certain critical limits. Described here are the characteristics of clear ice and rime ice and the specific types of hazards they present to airplanes and lighter than air vehicles. The weather records are classified according to the two general types of formation (clear ice and rime) together with the respective temperatures, relative humidities, clouds, and elevations above ground at which formations occurred. This classification includes 108 cases where rime formed, 43 cases in which clear ice formed, and 4 cases when both rime and clear ice formed during the same flight. It is evident from the above figures that there was a preponderance of rime by the ratio of 2.5 to 1, while in only a few cases both types of ice formation occurred during the same flight.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Methods of visually determining the air flow around airplanes

Methods of visually determining the air flow around airplanes

Date: July 1, 1932
Creator: Gough, Melvin N & Johnson, Ernest
Description: This report describes methods used by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to study visually the air flow around airplanes. The use of streamers, oil and exhaust gas streaks, lampblack and kerosene, powdered materials, and kerosene smoke is briefly described. The generation and distribution of smoke from candles and from titanium tetrachloride are described in greater detail because they appear most advantageous for general application. Examples are included showing results of the various methods.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The nature of air flow about the tail of an airplane in a spin

The nature of air flow about the tail of an airplane in a spin

Date: May 1, 1932
Creator: Scudder, N F & Miller, M P
Description: Air flow about the fuselage and empennage during a high-angle-of-attack spin was made visible in flight by means of titanium-tetrachloride smoke and was photographed with a motion-picture camera. The angular relation of the direction of the smoke streamer to the airplane axes was computed and compared with the angular direction of the motion in space derived from instrument measurement of the spin of the airplane for a nearly identical mass distribution. The results showed that the fin and upper part of the rudder were almost completely surrounded by dead air, which would render them inoperative; that the flow around the lower portion of the rudder and the fuselage was nonturbulent; and that air flowing past the cockpit in a high-angle-of-attack spin could not subsequently flow around control surfaces.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
FIRST PREV 1 2 NEXT LAST