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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Year: 1936
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Notes
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Analysis and model tests of autogiro jump take-off

Analysis and model tests of autogiro jump take-off

Date: October 1, 1936
Creator: Wheatley, John B & Bioletti, Carlton
Description: An analysis is made of the autogiro jump take-off, in which the kinetic energy of the rotor turning at excess speed is used to effect a vertical take-off. By the use of suitable approximations, the differential equation of motion of the rotor during this maneuver is reduced to a form that can be solved. Only the vertical jump was studied; the effect of a forward motion during the jump is discussed briefly. The results of model tests of the jump take-off have been incorporated in the paper and used to establish the relative accuracy of the results predicted from the analysis. Good agreement between calculation and experiment was obtained by making justifiable allowances.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Boosted performance of a compression-ignition engine with a displaced piston

Boosted performance of a compression-ignition engine with a displaced piston

Date: May 1, 1936
Creator: Moore, Charles S & Foster, Hampton H
Description: Performance tests were made using a rectangular displacer arranged so that the combustion air was forced through equal passages at either end of the displacer into the vertical-disk combustion chamber of a single-cylinder, four-stroke-cycle compression-ignition test engine. After making tests to determine optimum displacer height, shape, and fuel-spray arrangement, engine-performance tests were made at 1,500 and 2,000 r.p.m. for a range of boost pressures from 0 to 20 inches of mercury and for maximum cylinder pressures up to 1,150 pounds per square inch. The engine operation for boosted conditions was very smooth, there being no combustion shock even at the highest maximum cylinder pressures. Indicated mean effective pressures of 240 pounds per square inch for fuel consumptions of 0.39 pound per horsepower-hour have been readily reproduced during routine testing at 2,000 r.p.m. at a boost pressure of 20 inches of mercury.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Calculated effect of various types of flap on take-off over obstacles

Calculated effect of various types of flap on take-off over obstacles

Date: May 1, 1936
Creator: Wetmore, J W
Description: In order to determine whether or not flaps could be expected to have any beneficial effect on take-off performance, the distances required to take off and climb to an altitude of 50 feet were calculated for hypothetical airplanes, corresponding to relatively high-speed types and equipped with several types of flap. The types considered are the Fowler wing, the Hall wing, the split flap, the balanced split flap, the plain flap, and the external-airfoil flap. The results indicate that substantial reductions in take-off distance are possible through the use of flaps, provided that the proper flap angle corresponding to a given set of conditions is used. The best flap angle for taking off varies inversely as power loading and, to a much smaller extent, varies inversely with wing loading. Apparently, the best take-off characteristics are provided by the type of device in which the flap forms an extension to the main wing as in the case of the Fowler wing and the external-airfoil flap.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Carbon-monoxide indicators for aircraft

Carbon-monoxide indicators for aircraft

Date: July 1, 1936
Creator: Womack, S H J & Peterson, J B
Description: Several improvements that have been made on commercially available carbon-monoxide indicators to make them more suitable for aircraft use are described. These improvements include an automatic flow regulator, which permits the use of a simplified instrument on aircraft where a source of suction is available, and a more reliable alarm attachment. A field method for testing instruments on standard samples of carbon monoxide is described. Performance data and instructions in operation and maintenance are given.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Charts for calculating the performance of airplanes having constant-speed propellers

Charts for calculating the performance of airplanes having constant-speed propellers

Date: September 1, 1936
Creator: White, Roland J & Martin, Victor J
Description: Charts are presented for determining the performance of airplanes having variable-pitch propellers, the pitch of which is assumed to be adjusted to maintain constant speed for all rates of flight. The charts are based on the general performance equations developed by Oswald in reference 1, and are used in a similar manner. Examples applying the charts to airplanes having both supercharged and unsupercharged engines are included.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Circular motion of bodies of revolution

Circular motion of bodies of revolution

Date: February 1, 1936
Creator: Kaplan, Carl
Description: The circular motion for airship-like bodies has thus far been calculated only for a prolate ellipsoid of revolution (reference 1, p.133 and reference 2). In this paper, however, the circular motion of elongated bodies of revolution more nearly resembling airships will be investigated. The results will give the effect of rotation on the pressure distribution and thus yield some information as to the stresses set up in an airship in circular flight.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Combustion-engine temperatures by the sodium line-reversal method

Combustion-engine temperatures by the sodium line-reversal method

Date: March 1, 1936
Creator: Brevoort, Maurice J
Description: The sodium line-reversal method has been used in some preliminary measurements of flame temperature. Improvements in the method involving a photographic recorder and a means of correcting for the dirtiness of the windows are described. The temperatures so obtained are compared with those calculated from pressure diagrams.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A comparison of corrosion-resistant steel (18 percent chromium - 8 percent nickel) and aluminum alloy (24st)

A comparison of corrosion-resistant steel (18 percent chromium - 8 percent nickel) and aluminum alloy (24st)

Date: March 1, 1936
Creator: Sullivan, J E
Description: In the selection of materials for aircraft application, it is not enough to make the selection on a strength-weight basis alone. A strength-weight comparison is significant but other factors must be considered, for while a material with a high ratio of strength to weight may be perfectly satisfactory for one use, it may be totally unfitted for another. It is essential, among other things, that the probable nature, magnitude, and direction of the principal stresses be given special consideration. The following analysis has therefore been made with this in mind. An attempt has been made to cover insofar as possible the major, but not all the points, that a designer would consider in the use of "18-8", as it is commonly referred to, and 24ST aluminum alloy, as applied to aircraft. 24ST was selected for this comparison as it has practically replaced 17ST for aircraft construction and it appears to have the best combination of properties of the alloys now available for this purpose. The cost of fabrication has not been considered.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Considerations of the take-off problem

Considerations of the take-off problem

Date: February 1, 1936
Creator: Hartman, Edwin P
Description: Many technical papers on the various phases of airplane take-off have been published. Frequently, however, there appear new ideas which affect only particular scattered phases of the subject and which do not receive individual publication. It is the purpose of this paper to present several ideas of this nature which may be of considerable aid in calculating take-off performance and one idea which should correct what appears to be a popular misconception of the importance of static propeller thrust. Although these considerations all concern the general problem of take-off, they are not directly related and therefore will be treated in individual sections.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effect of changes in tail arrangement upon the spinning of a low-wing monoplane model

Effect of changes in tail arrangement upon the spinning of a low-wing monoplane model

Date: June 1, 1936
Creator: Zimmerman, C H
Description: A series of tests was made in the N.A.C.A. free spinning tunnel to find the effect upon spinning characteristics of systematic changes in tail arrangement. The tests were made with a 1/16-scale made of a low-wing monoplane of modern design. The changes consisted of: (1) variation of the fuselage length; (2) variation of the fore-and-aft location of the vertical surfaces; and (3) variation of the vertical location of the horizontal surfaces. The spinning characteristics of the model, including the number of turns required for recovery, were found to vary systematically and regularly with systematic changes in the tail arrangement. The following changes in tail arrangement had harmful effects upon the recovery characteristics (which originally were excellent): (1) shortening the fuselage; (2) placing the vertical surfaces directly above the horizontal surfaces as compared with locations either fore or aft of this position; (3) moving the horizontal surfaces downward from their original location at the top of the fuselage.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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