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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Year: 1938
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Notes
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
The aerodynamic drag of five models of side floats N.A.C.A. Models 51-E, 51-F, 51-G, 51-H, 51-J

The aerodynamic drag of five models of side floats N.A.C.A. Models 51-E, 51-F, 51-G, 51-H, 51-J

Date: December 1, 1938
Creator: House, R O
Description: The drag of five models of side floats was measured in the N.A.C.A. 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel. The most promising method of reducing the drag of floats indicated by these tests is lowering the angle at which the floats are rigged. The addition of a step to a float does not always increase the drag in the flying range, floats with steps sometimes having lower drag than similar floats without steps. Making the bow chine no higher than necessary might result in a reduction in air drag because of the lower angle of pitch of the chines. Since side floats are used formally to obtain lateral stability when the seaplane is operating on the water at slow speeds or at rest, greater consideration can be given to factors affecting aerodynamic drag than is possible for other types of floats and hulls.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Discharge characteristics of a simulated unit injection system

Discharge characteristics of a simulated unit injection system

Date: November 1, 1938
Creator: Marsh, Edred T
Description: Rate-of-discharge curves that show the discharge characteristics of an injection system having a very short fuel passage are presented. The rate of discharge closely follows the rate of displacement of the injection-pump plunger for open nozzles in which the maximum calculated pressures at the orifice do not exceed a certain value, which is dependent on the particular injection pump. With small orifices and high pump speeds, the rate of discharge does not follow the rate of plunger displacement because the higher discharge pressure results in increased leakage with corresponding decrease in discharge rate. The rate of discharge is not directly related to the rate of plunger displacement with automatic injection valves having closed nozzles. The types of pump check valve tested did not control the rate of cut-off or the discharge rate but they did affect the injection lag. Use of the short fuel passage eliminated the formation of secondary discharges.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The drag of inflatable rubber de-icers

The drag of inflatable rubber de-icers

Date: October 1, 1938
Creator: Robinson, Russell G
Description: Force tests on rubber de-icer models of several different profiles, at approximately one-third full scale, been carried out in the NACA 8-foot high speed wind tunnel. The conventional de-icer installation, deflated, added about 15 percent to the smooth-wing drag and, inflated, added about 100 percent. An improved installation with flash attaching strips added about 10 percent, deflated. The bulging, or ballooning, of de-icers from the wing surface is described and some remedies are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The effect of air-passage length on the optimum fin spacing for maximum cooling

The effect of air-passage length on the optimum fin spacing for maximum cooling

Date: May 1, 1938
Creator: Brevoort, Maurice J
Description: The effect on cooling of baffle length with optimum cylinder finning is discussed. Results from tests of several streamlined cylinders are given. It is shown that by employing several baffles the cooling can be increased several times.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effect of spark-timing regularity on the knock of engine performance

Effect of spark-timing regularity on the knock of engine performance

Date: May 1, 1938
Creator: Biermann, Arnold E
Description: Tests on a high-speed single-cylinder engine are described. The regularity of the spark timing was varied by driving the timer from different engine shafts. A simple and reasonably accurate method of determining the spark timing is described. The results show that irregular spark timing may cause large errors in tests of the knocking properties of fuels. For the engine tested, it was found that a change of one crankshaft degree in spark restart was equivalent to an 0.85 inch Hg change in allowable inlet pressure.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The effects of partial-span plain flaps on the aerodynamic characteristics of a rectangular and a tapered Clark Y wing

The effects of partial-span plain flaps on the aerodynamic characteristics of a rectangular and a tapered Clark Y wing

Date: September 1, 1938
Creator: House, R O
Description: An investigation was made to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of tapered and rectangular wings with partial-span plain flaps. Two Clark Y airfoils equipped with center section and with tip-section flaps were tested. The results showed that the aerodynamic characteristics of partial-span plain flaps were, in general, similar to those of split flaps of the same span, but that the lift and the drag were less for the wing with plain flaps than for the wing with split flaps of comparable size. For the rectangular wing with center-section plain flaps, the maximum lift and the lift-drag ratio at maximum lift were greater and the drag at maximum lift was less than for the wing with tip-section plain flaps of the same size. The maximum lift of the tapered wing varied in the same manner as that of the rectangular wing but the drag and the lift-drag-ratio relationship were opposite.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Engine performance and knock rating of fuels for high-output aircraft engines

Engine performance and knock rating of fuels for high-output aircraft engines

Date: April 1, 1938
Creator: Rothbrock, A M & Biermann, Arnold E
Description: Data are presented to show the effects of inlet-air pressure, inlet-air temperature, and compression ratio on the maximum permissible performance obtained on a single-cylinder test engine with aircraft-engine fuels varying from a fuel of 87 octane number to one 100 octane number plus 1 ml of tetraethyl lead per gallon. The data were obtained on a 5-inch by 5.75-inch liquid-cooled engine operating at 2,500 r.p.m. The compression ratio was varied from 6.50 to 8.75. The inlet-air temperature was varied from 120 to 280 F. and the inlet-air pressure from 30 inches of mercury absolute to the highest permissible. The limiting factors for the increase in compression ratio and in inlet-air pressure was the occurrence of either audible or incipient knock. The data are correlated to show that, for any one fuel,there is a definite relationship between the limiting conditions of inlet-air temperature and density at any compression ratio. This relationship is dependent on the combustion-gas temperature and density relationship that causes knock. The report presents a suggested method of rating aircraft-engine fuels based on this relationship. It is concluded that aircraft-engine fuels cannot be satisfactorily rated by any single factor, such as octane number, highest useful compression ratio, or allowable ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The estimation of the rate of change of yawing moment with sideslip

The estimation of the rate of change of yawing moment with sideslip

Date: February 1, 1938
Creator: Imlay, Frederick H
Description: Wind-tunnel data are presented on the rate of change of yawing moment with sideslip for tests of 9 complete airplane models, 20 fuselage shapes, and 3 wing models with various combinations of dihedral, sweepback, and twist. The data were collected during a survey of existing information, which was made to find a reliable method of computing the yawing moment due to sideslip. Important errors common to methods of computation used at present appear to be due to large interference effects, the investigation of which will undoubtedly require an extensive program of systematic wind-tunnel tests. At present it is necessary to place considerable reliance on past design experience in proportioning an airplane so as to obtain a reasonable degree of directional stability.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Fatigue testing of wing beam by the resonance method

Fatigue testing of wing beam by the resonance method

Date: August 1, 1938
Creator: Bleakney, William M
Description: Preliminary fatigue tests on two aluminum-alloy wing-beam specimens subjected to reversed axial loading are described. The motion used consists in incorporating one or two reciprocating motors in a resonance system of which the specimen is the spring element. A description is given of the reciprocating motors, and of the method of assembling and adjusting the vibrating system. The results indicate that the method is well adapted to fatigue tests of not only uniform wing beams but also wing beams with asymmetrical local reinforcements.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Flight and wind-tunnel tests of an XBM-1 dive bomber

Flight and wind-tunnel tests of an XBM-1 dive bomber

Date: April 1, 1938
Creator: Donely, Philip & Pearson, Henry A
Description: Results are given of pressure-distribution measurements made in flight over the right wing cellule and the right half of the horizontal tail surfaces of a dive-bombing biplane. Simultaneous measurements were also taken of the air speed, control-surface positions, control forces, and normal accelerations during various abrupt maneuvers in vertical plane. These maneuvers consisted of push-downs and pull-ups from level flight, dives and dive pull-ups from inverted flight. Besides the pressure measurements, flight tests were made to obtain (1) wing-fabric deflections during dives and (2) variation of the minimum drag coefficient with Reynolds Number. Supplementary tests were also done in the full-scale wind tunnel to obtain the characteristics of the airplane under various propeller conditions and with various tail settings. The results indicate that: (1) by increasing the fabric deflection between pressure ribs, the span load distribution was considerably modified near the center and the wing moment relations were changed; and (2) the minimum drag was less for the idling propeller than for the propeller locked in a vertical position. The value of C(sub D sub min) was equal to K(Reynolds Number)(exp -0.03) for a range from 2,800,000 to 13,100,000.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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