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 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Reports
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Aircraft power-plant instruments

Aircraft power-plant instruments

Date: January 1, 1934
Creator: Sontag, Harcourt & Brombacher, W. G.
Description: This report supersedes NACA-TR-129 which is now obsolete. Aircraft power-plant instruments include tachometers, engine thermometers, pressure gages, fuel-quantity gages, fuel flow meters and indicators, and manifold pressure gages. The report includes a description of the commonly used types and some others, the underlying principle utilized in the design, and some design data. The inherent errors of the instrument, the methods of making laboratory tests, descriptions of the test apparatus, and data in considerable detail in the performance of commonly used instruments are presented. Standard instruments and, in cases where it appears to be of interest, those used as secondary standards are described. A bibliography of important articles is included.
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Aircraft rate-of-climb indicators

Aircraft rate-of-climb indicators

Date: January 1, 1939
Creator: Johnson, Daniel P.
Description: The theory of the rate-of-climb indicator is developed in a form adapted for application to the instrument in its present-day form. Compensations for altitude, temperature, and rate of change of temperature are discussed from the designer's standpoint on the basis of this theory. Certain dynamic effects, including instrument lag, and the use of the rate-of-climb indicator as a statoscope are also considered. Modern instruments are described. A laboratory test procedure is outlined and test results are given.
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Aircraft speed instruments

Aircraft speed instruments

Date: January 1, 1933
Creator: Beij, K Hilding
Description: This report presents a concise survey of the measurement of air speed and ground speed on board aircraft. Special attention is paid to the pitot-static air-speed meter which is the standard in the United States for airplanes. Air-speed meters of the rotating vane type are also discussed in considerable detail on account of their value as flight test instruments and as service instruments for airships. Methods of ground-speed measurement are treated briefly, with reference to the more important instruments. A bibliography on air-speed measurement concludes the report.
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Aircraft woods: their properties, selection, and characteristics

Aircraft woods: their properties, selection, and characteristics

Date: January 1, 1931
Creator: Markwardt, L J
Description: Strength values of various woods for aircraft design for a 15 per cent moisture condition of material and a 3-second duration of stress are presented, and also a discussion of the various factors affecting the values. The toughness-test method of selecting wood is discussed, and a table of acceptance values for several species is given.
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Airfoil pressure distribution investigation in the variable density wind tunnel

Airfoil pressure distribution investigation in the variable density wind tunnel

Date: January 1, 1931
Creator: Jacobs, Eastman N; Stack, John & Pinkerton, Robert M
Description: Report presents the results of wind tunnel tests of pressure distribution measurements over one section each of six airfoils. Pressure distribution diagrams, as well as the integrated characteristics of the airfoils, are given for both a high and a low dynamic scale or, Reynolds number VL/V, for comparison with flight and other wind-tunnel tests, respectively. It is concluded that the scale effect is very important only at angles of attack near the burble. The distribution of pressure over an airfoil having a Joukowski section is compared with the theoretically derived distribution. A further study of the distribution of pressure over all of the airfoils resulted in the development of an approximate method of predicting the pressure distribution along the chord of any normal airfoil for all attitudes within the working range if the distribution at one attitude is known.
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Airfoil profiles for minimum pressure drag at supersonic velocities -- general analysis with application to linearized supersonic flow

Airfoil profiles for minimum pressure drag at supersonic velocities -- general analysis with application to linearized supersonic flow

Date: January 1, 1952
Creator: Chapman, Dean R
Description: A theoretical investigation is made of the airfoil profile for minimum pressure drag at zero lift in supersonic flow. In the first part of the report a general method is developed for calculating the profile having the least pressure drag for a given auxiliary condition, such as a given structural requirement or a given thickness ratio. The various structural requirements considered include bending strength, bending stiffness, torsional strength, and torsional stiffness. No assumption is made regarding the trailing-edge thickness; the optimum value is determined in the calculations as a function of the base pressure. To illustrate the general method, the optimum airfoil, defined as the airfoil having minimum pressure drag for a given auxiliary condition, is calculated in a second part of the report using the equations of linearized supersonic flow.
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Airfoil section characteristics as affected by protuberances

Airfoil section characteristics as affected by protuberances

Date: July 11, 1932
Creator: Jacobs, Eastman N
Description: The drag and interference caused by protuberance from the surface of an airfoil have been determined in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel at a Reynolds number approximately 3,100,000. The effects of variations of the fore-and-aft position, height, and shape of the protuberance were measured by determining how the airfoil section characteristics were affected by the addition of the various protuberances extending along the entire span of the airfoil. The results provide fundamental data on which to base the prediction of the effects of actual short-span protuberances. The data may also be applied to the design of air brakes and spoilers.
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Airfoil section characteristics as affected by variations of the Reynolds number

Airfoil section characteristics as affected by variations of the Reynolds number

Date: 1939
Creator: Jacobs, Eastman N & Sherman, Albert
Description: Report presents the results of an investigation of a systematically chosen representative group of related airfoils conducted in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel over a wide range of Reynolds number extending well into the flight range. The tests were made to provide information from which the variations of airfoil section characteristics with changes in the Reynolds number could be inferred and methods of allowing for these variations in practice could be determined. This work is one phase of an extensive and general airfoil investigation being conducted in the variable-density tunnel and extends the previously published researches concerning airfoil characteristics as affected by variations in airfoil profile determined at a single value of the Reynolds number.
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Airfoil section characteristics as applied to the prediction of air forces and their distribution on wings

Airfoil section characteristics as applied to the prediction of air forces and their distribution on wings

Date: 1938
Creator: Jacobs, Eastman N & Rhode, R V
Description: The results of previous reports dealing with airfoil section characteristics and span load distribution data are coordinated into a method for determining the air forces and their distribution on airplane wings. Formulas are given from which the resultant force distribution may be combined to find the wing aerodynamic center and pitching moment. The force distribution may also be resolved to determine the distribution of chord and beam components. The forces are resolved in such a manner that it is unnecessary to take the induced drag into account. An illustration of the method is given for a monoplane and a biplane for the conditions of steady flight and a sharp-edge gust. The force determination is completed by outlining a procedure for finding the distribution of load along the chord of airfoil sections.
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Airfoil section data obtained in the NACA variable-density tunnel as affected by support interference and other corrections

Airfoil section data obtained in the NACA variable-density tunnel as affected by support interference and other corrections

Date: 1939
Creator: Jacobs, Eastman N & Abbott, Ira H
Description: The results of an investigation of the effect of support interference on airfoil drag data obtained in the variable-density tunnel are presented. As a result of the support interference, previously published airfoil data from the variable-density tunnel have shown too large drag coefficients and too large a rate of increase of drag coefficients and too large a rate increase of drag coefficients with airfoil thickness. The practical effect of the corrections on the choice of the optimum section is briefly considered and corrected data for a selected list of airfoils are presented as a convenience to the designer. Methods of correcting published data for other airfoils are presented.
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Airplane dopes and doping

Airplane dopes and doping

Date: January 1, 1919
Creator: Smith, W H
Description: Cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate are the important constituents of airplane dopes in use at the present time, but planes were treated with other materials in the experimental stages of flying. The above compounds belong to the class of colloids and are of value because they produce a shrinking action on the fabric when drying out of solution, rendering it drum tight. Other colloids possessing the same property have been proposed and tried. In the first stages of the development of dope, however, shrinkage was not considered. The fabric was treated merely to render it waterproof. The first airplanes constructed were covered with cotton fabric stretched as tightly as possible over the winds, fuselage, etc., and flying was possible only in fine weather. The necessity of an airplane which would fly under all weather conditions at once became apparent. Then followed experiments with rubberized fabrics, fabrics treated with glue rendered insoluble by formaldehyde or bichromate, fabrics treated with drying and nondrying oils, shellac, casein, etc. It was found that fabrics treated as above lost their tension in damp weather, and the oil from the motor penetrated the proofing material and weakened the fabric. For the most part the film of ...
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Airplane Stress Analysis

Airplane Stress Analysis

Date: January 1, 1918
Creator: Zahm, A F & Crook, L H
Description: Report presents stress analysis of individual components of an airplane. Normal and abnormal loads, sudden loads, simple stresses, indirect simple stresses, resultant unit stress, repetitive and equivalent stress, maximum steady load and stress are considered.
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The airplane tensiometer

The airplane tensiometer

Date: 1919
Creator: Larson, L J
Description: Certain parts of an airplane are subjected not only to the stresses imposed by the aerodynamic or flying load, but also to the initial stresses, caused by the tension in the stay and drift wires. Report describes a tensiometer that measures such stresses which is simple in construction, accurate, and easily and quickly operated even by inexperienced persons. Two sizes of the instrument are available. One is suitable for wires up to one-fourth inch in diameter and the other for wires from one-fourth to three-eights inch in diameter.
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Airship model tests in the variable density wind tunnel

Airship model tests in the variable density wind tunnel

Date: January 27, 1931
Creator: Abbott, Ira H
Description: This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests conducted to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of airship models. Eight Goodyear-Zeppelin airship models were tested in the original closed-throat tunnel. After the tunnel was rebuilt with an open throat a new model was tested, and one of the Goodyear-Zeppelin models was retested. The results indicate that much may be done to determine the drag of airships from evaluations of the pressure and skin-frictional drags on models tested at large Reynolds number.
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An airship slide rule

An airship slide rule

Date: 1924?~
Creator: Weaver, E. R. & Pickering, S. F.
Description: This report prepared for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, describes an airship slide rule developed by the Gas-Chemistry Section of the Bureau of Standards, at the request of the Bureau of Engineering of the Navy Department. It is intended primarily to give rapid solutions of a few problems of frequent occurrence in airship navigation, but it can be used to advantage in solving a great variety of problems, involving volumes, lifting powers, temperatures, pressures, altitudes and the purity of the balloon gas. The rule is graduated to read directly in the units actually used in making observations, constants and conversion factors being taken care of by the length and location of the scales. It is thought that with this rule practically any problem likely to arise in this class of work can be readily solved after the user has become familiar with the operation of the rule; and that the solution will, in most cases, be as accurate as the data warrant.
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Alternating-current equipment for the measurement of fluctuations of air speed in turbulent flow

Alternating-current equipment for the measurement of fluctuations of air speed in turbulent flow

Date: March 1937
Creator: Mock, W. C., Jr.
Description: Recent electrical and mechanical improvements have been made in the equipment developed at the National Bureau of Standards for measurement of fluctuations of air speed in turbulent flow. Data useful in the design of similar equipment are presented. The design of rectified alternating-current power supplies for such apparatus is treated briefly, and the effect of the power supplies on the performance of the equipment is discussed.
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The altitude effect on air speed indicators

The altitude effect on air speed indicators

Date: 1917~
Creator: Hersey, M. D.; Hunt, F. L. & Eaton, H. N.
Description: The object of this report is to present the results of a theoretical and experimental study of the effect, on the performance of air speed indicators, of the different atmospheric conditions experienced at various altitudes.
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The altitude effect on air speed indicators II

The altitude effect on air speed indicators II

Date: 1923?~
Creator: Eaton, H. N. & Macnair, W. A.
Description: In an investigation described in NACA Technical Report 110, it was shown that under certain conditions, particularly for the relatively low-speed flight of airships, the data obtained were not sufficiently accurate. This report describes an investigation in which the data obtained were sufficiently accurate and complete to enable the viscosity correction to be deduced quantitatively for a number of the air-speed pressure nozzles in common use. The report opens with a discussion of the theory of the performance of air-speed nozzles and of the calibration of the indicators, from which the theory of the altitude correction is developed. Then follows the determination of the performance characteristics of the nozzles and calibration constants used for the indicators. In the latter half of the report, the viscosity correction is computed for the Zahm Pitot-venturi nozzles.
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The altitude laboratory for the test of aircraft engines

The altitude laboratory for the test of aircraft engines

Date: 1920?~
Creator: Dickinson, H C & Boutell, H G
Description: Report presents descriptions, schematics, and photographs of the altitude laboratory for the testing of aircraft engines constructed at the Bureau of Standards for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
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Altitude-pressure tables based on the United States standard atmosphere

Altitude-pressure tables based on the United States standard atmosphere

Date: 1936?~
Creator: Brombacher, W. G.
Description: This report is a revision of the altitude pressure tables of the United States standard atmosphere given in Technical Report No. 246. The altitude range has been extended from 50,000 to 80,000 feet.
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Aluminum and its light alloys

Aluminum and its light alloys

Date: 1920?~
Creator: Merica, Paul D
Description: Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described.
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Analog study of interacting and noninteracting multiple-loop control systems for turbojet engines

Analog study of interacting and noninteracting multiple-loop control systems for turbojet engines

Date: January 1, 1955
Creator: Pack, George J & Phillips, W E , Jr
Description: The results of an analog investigation of several turbojet-engine control configurations is presented in this report. Both proportional and proportional-plus-integral controllers were studied, and compensating terms for engine interaction were added to the control system. Data were obtained on the stability limits and the transient responses of these various configurations. Analytical expressions in terms of the component transfer functions were developed for the configurations studied, and the optimum form for the compensation terms was determined. It was found that the addition of the integral term, while making the system slower and more oscillatory, was desirable in that it made the final values of the system parameters independent of source of disturbance and also eliminated droop in these parameters. Definite improvement in system characteristics resulted from the use of proper compensation terms. At comparable gain points the compensated system was faster and more stable. Complete compensation eliminated engine interaction, permitting each loop to be developed to an optimum point independently.
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Analysis and calculation by integral methods of laminar compressible boundary-layer with heat transfer and with and without pressure gradient

Analysis and calculation by integral methods of laminar compressible boundary-layer with heat transfer and with and without pressure gradient

Date: January 1, 1955
Creator: Morduchow, Morris
Description: A survey of integral methods in laminar-boundary-layer analysis is first given. A simple and sufficiently accurate method for practical purposes of calculating the properties (including stability) of the laminar compressible boundary layer in an axial pressure gradient with heat transfer at the wall is presented. For flow over a flat plate, the method is applicable for an arbitrarily prescribed distribution of temperature along the surface and for any given constant Prandtl number close to unity. For flow in a pressure gradient, the method is based on a Prandtl number of unity and a uniform wall temperature. A simple and accurate method of determining the separation point in a compressible flow with an adverse pressure gradient over a surface at a given uniform wall temperature is developed. The analysis is based on an extension of the Karman-Pohlhausen method to the momentum and the thermal energy equations in conjunction with fourth- and especially higher degree velocity and stagnation-enthalpy profiles.
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Analysis and modification of theory for impact of seaplanes on water

Analysis and modification of theory for impact of seaplanes on water

Date: January 1, 1945
Creator: Mayo, Wilbur L
Description: An analysis of available theory on seaplane impact and a proposed modification thereto are presented. In previous methods the overall momentum of the float and virtual mass has been assumed to remain constant during the impact but the present analysis shows that this assumption is rigorously correct only when the resultant velocity of the float is normal to the keel. The proposed modification chiefly involves consideration of the fact that forward velocity of the seaplane float causes momentum to be passed into the hydrodynamic downwash (an action that is the entire consideration in the case of the planing float) and consideration of the fact that, for an impact with trim, the rate of penetration is determined not only by the velocity component normal to the keel but also by the velocity component parallel to the keel, which tends to reduce the penetration. Experimental data for planing, oblique impact, and vertical drop are used to show that the accuracy of the proposed theory is good.
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