You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Special Report
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Performance Characteristics of an Aircraft Engine with Exhaust Turbine Supercharger, Special Report

Performance Characteristics of an Aircraft Engine with Exhaust Turbine Supercharger, Special Report

Date: May 1, 1941
Creator: Lester, E. M. & Paulson, V. A.
Description: The Pratt and Whitney Aircraft company and the Naval Aircraft Factory of the United States Navy cooperated in a laboratory and flight program of tests on an exhaust turbine supercharger. Two series of dynamometer tests of the engine super-charger combination were completed under simulated altitude conditions. One series of hot gas-chamber tests was conducted by the manufacturer of the supercharger. Flight demonstrations of the supercharger installed in a twin-engine flying boat were terminated by failure of the turbine wheels. The analysis of the results indicated that a two-stage supercharger with the first-stage exhaust turbine driven will deliver rated power for a given indicated power to a higher altitude, will operate more efficiently, and will require simpler controls than a similar engine with the first stage of the supercharger driven from the crankshaft through multispeed gears.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing Ducts for Radiators, Special Report

Preliminary Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing Ducts for Radiators, Special Report

Date: March 1, 1938
Creator: Silverstein, Abe & Nickle, F. R.
Description: Wing ducts for liquid-cooled engine radiators have been investigated in the N.A.C.A. full-scale wind tunnel on a large model airplane. The tests were made to determine the relative merits of several types of duct and radiator installations for an airplane of a particular design. In the test program the principal duct dimensions were systematically varied, and the results are therefore somewhat applicable to the general problems of wing duct design, although they should be considered as preliminary and only indicative of the inherent possibilities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Investigation of Certain Laminar-Flow Airfoils for Application at High Speeds and Reynolds Numbers

Preliminary Investigation of Certain Laminar-Flow Airfoils for Application at High Speeds and Reynolds Numbers

Date: August 1, 1939
Creator: Jacobs, E.N.; Abbott, Ira H. & von Doenhoff, A.E.
Description: In order to extend the useful range of Reynolds numbers of airfoils designed to take advantage of the extensive laminar boundary layers possible in an air stream of low turbulence, tests were made of the NACA 2412-34 and 1412-34 sections in the NACA low-turbulence tunnel. Although the possible extent of the laminar boundary layer on these airfoils is not so great as for specially designed laminar-flow airfoils, it is greater than that for conventional airfoils, and is sufficiently extensive so that at Reynolds numbers above 11,000,000 the laminar region is expected to be limited by the permissible 'Reynolds number run' and not by laminar separation as is the case with conventional airfoils. Drag measurements by the wake-survey method and pressure-distribution measurements were made at several lift coefficients through a range of Reynolds numbers up to 11,400,000. The drag scale-effect curve for the NACA 1412-34 is extrapolated to a Reynolds number of 30,000,000 on the basis of theoretical calculations of the skin friction. Comparable skin-friction calculations were made for the NACA 23012. The results indicate that, for certain applications at moderate values of the Reynolds number, the NACA 1412-34 and 2412-34 airfoils offer some advantages over such conventional airfoils as the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Investigation of the Effect of Compressibility on the Maximum Lift Coefficient, Special Report

Preliminary Investigation of the Effect of Compressibility on the Maximum Lift Coefficient, Special Report

Date: February 1, 1943
Creator: Stack, John; Fedziuk, Henry A. & Cleary, Harold E.
Description: Preliminary data are presented on the variation of the maximum lift coefficient with Mach number. The data were obtained from tests in the 8-foot high-speed tunnel of three NACA 16-series airfoils of 1-foot chord. Measurements consisted primarily of pressure-distribution measurements in order to illustrate the nature of the phenomena. It was found that the maximum lift coefficient of airfoils is markedly affected by compressibility even at Mach numbers as low as 0.2. At high Mach numbers pronounced decrease of the maximum lift coefficient was found. The magnitude of the effects of compressibility on the maximum lift coefficient and the low speeds at which these effects first appear indicate clearly that consideration of the take-off thrust for propellers will give results seriously in error if these considerations are based on the usual low-speed maximum-lift-coefficient data generally used.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Model Tests of a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

Preliminary Model Tests of a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

Date: February 1, 1939
Creator: Biermann, David & Valentine, E. Floyd
Description: Wind-tunnel tests were conducted on a model wing-nacelle combination to determine the practicability of cooling radial engines by forcing the cooling air into wing-duct entrances located in the propeller slipstream, passing the air through the engine baffles from rear to front, and ejecting the air through an annular slot near the front of the nacelle. The tests, which were of a preliminary nature, were made on a 5-foot-chord wing and a 20-inch-diameter nacelle. A 3-blade, 4-foot-diameter propeller was used. The tests indicated that this method of cooling and cowling radial engines is entirely practicable providing the wing of the prospective airplane is sufficiently thick to accommodate efficient entrance ducts , The drag of the cowlings tested was definitely less than for the conventional N.A.C.A. cowling, and the pressure available at low air speed corresponding to operation on the ground and at low flying speeds was apparently sufficient for cooling most present-day radial engines.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Tests in the NACA Tank to Investigate the Fundamental Characteristics of Hydrofoils

Preliminary Tests in the NACA Tank to Investigate the Fundamental Characteristics of Hydrofoils

Date: September 1, 1940
Creator: Ward, Kenneth E. & Land, Norman S.
Description: This preliminary investigation was made to study the hydrodynamic properties and general behavior of simple hydrofoils. Six 5- by 30-inch plain, rectangular hydrofoils were tested in the NACA tank at various speeds, angles of attack and depths below the water surface. Two of the hydrofoils had sections representing the sections of commonly used airfoils, one had a section similar to one developed Guidoni for use with hydrofoil-equipped seaplane floats, and three had sections designed to have constant chordwise pressure distributions at given values of the lift coefficient for the purpose of delaying the speed at which cavitation begins. The experimental results are presented as curves of the lift and drag coefficients plotted against speed for the various angles of attack and depths for which the hydrofoils were tested. A number of derived curves are included for the purpose of better comparing the characteristics of the hydrofoils and to show the effects of depth. Several representative photographs show the development of cavitation on the the upper surface of the hydrofoils. The results indicate that properly designed hydrofoil sections will have excellent characteristics and that the speed at which cavitation occurs may be delayed to an appreciable extent by the use of ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Tests of Blowers of Three Designs Operating in Conjunction with a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

Preliminary Tests of Blowers of Three Designs Operating in Conjunction with a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

Date: June 1, 1939
Creator: Biermann, David & Valentine, E. Floyd
Description: This paper is one of several dealing with methods intended to reduce the drag of present-day radial engine installations and improve the cooling at zero and low air speeds, The present paper describes model wind-tunnel tests of blowers of three designs tested in conjunction with a wing-nacelle combination. The principle of operation involved consists of drawing cooling air into ducts located in the wing root at the point of maximum slipstream velocity, passing the air through the engine baffles from rear to front, and exhausting the air through an annular slot located between the propeller and the engine with the aid of a blower mounted on the spinner. The test apparatus consisted essentially of a stub wing having a 5-foot chord and a 15-foot span, an engine nacelle of 20 inches diameter enclosing a 25-horsepower electric motor, and three blowers mounted on propeller spinners. Two of the blowers utilize centrifugal force while the other uses the lift from airfoils to force the air out radially through the exit slot. Maximum efficiencies of over 70 percent were obtained for the system as a whole. Pressures were measured over the entire flight range which were in excess of those necessary to cool ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Tests of Nose- and Side- Entrance Blower Cooling Systems for Radial Engines, Special Report

Preliminary Tests of Nose- and Side- Entrance Blower Cooling Systems for Radial Engines, Special Report

Date: July 1, 1939
Creator: Biermann, David & Valentine, E. Floyd
Description: Two cowling systems intended to reduce the drag and improve the low-speed cooling characteristics of conventional radial engine cowlings were tested in model form to determine the practicability of the methods. One cowling included a blower mounted on the rear face of a large propeller spinner which drew cooling air in through side entrance ducts located behind the equivalent engine orifice plate. The air was passed through the equivalent engine orifice plate from rear to front and out through a slot between the spinner and the engine plate. The blower produced substantially all the power necessary to circulate the cooling air in some cases, so the quantity of air flowing was independent of the air speed, Two types of blowers were used, a centrifugal type and one using airfoil blades which forced the air outward from the center of rotation. The other cowling was similar to the conventional N.A.C.A. cowling except for the addition of a large propeller spinner nose. The spinner was provided with a hole in the nose to admit cooling air and blower blades to increase the pressure for cooling at low speeds. The tests show that with both cowling types the basic drag of the nacelle ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Wind-Tunnel and Flight Tests of a Balanced Split Flap, Special Report

Preliminary Wind-Tunnel and Flight Tests of a Balanced Split Flap, Special Report

Date: August 1, 1934
Creator: Weick, Fred E. & Thompson, Floyd L.
Description: One disadvantage that has been apparent in the operation of split flaps as used to date is the time and effort required to operate them. In this communication an investigation is being made of possible means for balancing them aerodynamically to make their operation easier. Several arrangements have been tested in the 7 by 210 foot wind tunnel, and the results of the wind-tunnel tests as well as preliminary flight tests on one of the more promising forms are given in this paper.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Wind-Tunnel Tests of the Effect of Nacelles on the Characteristics of a Twin-Engine Bomber Model with Low-Drag Wing, Special Report

Preliminary Wind-Tunnel Tests of the Effect of Nacelles on the Characteristics of a Twin-Engine Bomber Model with Low-Drag Wing, Special Report

Date: July 1, 1942
Creator: Wenzinger, Carl J. & Sivells, James C.
Description: Tests were made in the NACA 19-foot pressure tunnel of a simplified twin-engine bomber model with an NACA low-drag wing primarily to obtain an indication of the effects of engine nacelles on the characteristics of the model both with and without simple split trailing-edge flaps. Nacelles with conventional-type cowlings representative of those used on an existing high-performance airplane and with NACA high-speed type E cowlings were tested. The tests were made without propeller slipstream. The aerodynamic effects of adding the nacelles to the low-drag wing were similar to the effects commonly obtained by adding similar nacelles to conventional wings. The maximum lift coefficient without flaps was slightly increased, but the increment in maximum lift due to deflecting the flaps was somewhat decreased. The stalling characteristics were improved by the presence of the nacelles. Addition of the nacelles had a destabilizing effect on the pitching moments, as is usual for nacelles that project forward of the wing. The drag increments due to the nacelles were of the usual order of magnitude, with the increment due to the nacelles with NACA type E cowlings approximately one-third less than that of the nacelles with conventional cowlings with built-in air scoops.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Present Status of Lateral-Control Devices for use with Split Flaps, Special Report

Present Status of Lateral-Control Devices for use with Split Flaps, Special Report

Date: August 1, 1933
Creator: Weick, Fred E.
Description: The increased use of split flaps for the dual purpose of reducing the landing speed and shortening the landing glide of airplanes has established as acute the problem of obtaining satisfactory lateral control to be used in conjunction with the flaps with out the sacrifice of any of the effectiveness of the flaps. A large amount of work is being done on this problem by various organizations and individuals. Several of the devices developed seem usable, some of them unquestionably so. The present paper attempts to summarize the most promising results obtained to date. Topics covered include ordinary ailerons, external ailerons, floating ailerons, upper-surface ailerons, and spoilers. Although the external ailerons above the trailing edge of the wing and the spoilers at the rear of the wing appear quite promising, it would seem that probably the most satisfactory immediate solution of the problem, including the obtaining of light and smoothly graduated control forces, would in most cases be obtained by the use of the arrangement in which the flap is retracted ahead of ordinary narrow-chord ailerons and is deflected to the rear as well as downward when in use.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Pressure Distribution on the Fuselage of a Midwing Airplane Model at High Speeds

Pressure Distribution on the Fuselage of a Midwing Airplane Model at High Speeds

Date: November 1, 1939
Creator: Delano, James B.
Description: The pressure distribution on the fuselage of a midwing airplane model was measured in the NACA 8-foot high speed wind tunnel at speeds from 140 to 440 miles per hour for lift coefficients ranging from -0.2 to 1.0. The primary purpose of the tests was to provide data showing the air pressures on various parts of the fuselage for use in structural design. The data may also be used for the design of scoops and vents. The results show that the highest negative pressures occurred near the wing and were more dependent on the wing than on the fuselage. At high speeds, the magnitude of the pressure coefficients as predicted from pressure coefficients determined experimentally at low speeds by application of the theoretical factor 1/(square root)1-M(exp 2) (where M is the ratio of the air speed to the speed of sound in air) may misrepresent the actual conditions. At the points where the maximum negative pressures ocurred, however, the variation of the pressure coefficients was in good agreement with the theoretical factor, indicating that this factor may afford satisfactory predictions of critical speed, at least for fuselages similar to the shape tested.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A profile-drag investigation in flight on an experimental fighter-type airplane the North American XP-51

A profile-drag investigation in flight on an experimental fighter-type airplane the North American XP-51

Date: January 1, 1942
Creator: Zalovcik, J. A.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Profile-Drag Investigation of an Airplane Wing Equipped with Rubber Inflatable De-Icer

Profile-Drag Investigation of an Airplane Wing Equipped with Rubber Inflatable De-Icer

Date: December 1, 1939
Creator: Rodert, Lewis A. & Jones, Alun R.
Description: The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics has made profile-drag measurements in flight of a wing which was equipped with a rubber inflatable de-icer and to which various stimulated ice formations were attached. Tuft observations at the stalling speed of the wing with the various drag conditions were made in order to determine the influence on the maximum lift coefficient. The de-icer installation caused an increase of from 10-20% in the profile drag of the plain wing and reduced CL(sub max) about 6%. Simulated ice, when confined to the leading-edge region of the de-icer, had no measurable influence upon the profile drag at the cruising speed. This ice condition, however, reduced the value of CL(sub max) to about three-fourths that of the plain wing. Simulated ice in the form of a ridge along the upper and lower de-icer cap-strips increased the profile drag by about 360% at cruising speed. This condition reduced the CL(sub max) to approximately one-half that of the plain wing value.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Propeller-Design Problems of High-Speed Airplanes, Special Report

Propeller-Design Problems of High-Speed Airplanes, Special Report

Date: April 1, 1941
Creator: Dickinson, H. B.
Description: It is shown that on the basis of existing high-speed airfoil data, propeller efficiencies appreciably in excess of 40% do not appear possible at speeds above 500 miles per hour at 20,000 feet. The assumption that present propeller-blade thicknesses cannot be reduced radically, is implied. Until the reliability and applicability of the airfoil data are established, this conclusion must not be regarded as infallible. Dive tests with airplanes equipped with thrust meters and torque meters are proposed to provide an urgently needed check. The design of high-speed propellers is dictated wholly by compressibility considerations. The blade width, thickness, and pitch distribution; also the airfoil sections, the lift coefficient, the propeller diameter, and rpm must all be adjusted if reasonable efficiencies are to be maintained at airplane speeds that are now being approached. Research is urgently needed on: 1) airfoils at subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds; 2) propellers at high forward speeds in wind tunnels; 3)propellers in free flight at high speeds; and 4) jet propulsion and related devices. The breakdown of propeller efficiency indicated by airfoil data, should serve as an incentive for accelerated research on jet propulsion. This device may extend the attainable speed of current airplanes to the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Radiator Design and Installation

Radiator Design and Installation

Date: May 1, 1939
Creator: Brevoort, M.J. & Leifer, M.
Description: The fundamental principles of fluid flow, pressure losses, and heat transfer have been presented and analyzed for the case of a smooth tube with fully developed turbulent flow. These equations apply to tubes with large length-diameter ratios where the f1ow is at a high Reynolds Number. The error introduced by using these equations increases as the magnitude of the tube length and the air-flow Reynolds Number approaches the values encountered in modern radiator designs. Accordingly, heat-transfer tests on radiator sections were made and the results are presented in nondimensional form to facilitate their use and for comparison with other heat-transfer data. In addition, pressure losses were measured along smooth tubes of circular, square, and rectangular cross section and the results were also correlated and are presented in nondimensional form. The problem of a radiator design for a particular installation is solved, the experimental heat-transfer and pressure-loss data being used, on a basis of power chargeable to the radiator for form drag, for propelling the weight, and for forcing the air through the radiator. The case of an installation within a wing or an engine nacelle is considered. An illustration of radiator design is carried through for an arbitrary set of ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Radiator Design and Installation - II, Special Report

Radiator Design and Installation - II, Special Report

Date: January 1, 1942
Creator: Tifford, Arthur N.
Description: A mathematical analysis of radiator design has been made. The volume of the radiator using least total power has been expressed in a single formula which shows that the optimum radiator volume is independent of the shape of the radiator and which makes possible the construction of design tables that give the optimum radiator volume per 100-horsepower heat dissipation as a function of the speed, of the altitude, and of one parameter involving characteristics of the airplane. Although, for a given set of conditions, the radiator volume using the least total power is fixed, the frontal area, or the length of the radiator needs to be separately specified in order to satisfy certain other requirement such as the ability to cool with the pressure drop available while the airplane is climbing. In order to simplify the specification for the shape of the radiator and in order to reduce the labor involved in calculating the detailed performance of radiators, generalized design curves have been developed for determining the pressure drop, the mass flow of air, and the power expended in overcoming the cooling drag of a radiator from the physical dimensions of the radiator. In addition, a table is derived from ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Relative Efficiencies and Design Charts for Various Engine-Propeller Combinations, Special Report

Relative Efficiencies and Design Charts for Various Engine-Propeller Combinations, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1936
Creator: Biermann, David
Description: The relative efficiencies of various engine-propeller combinations were the subject of a study that covered the important flight conditions, particularly the take-off. Design charts that graphically correlate the various propeller parameters were prepared to facilitate the solution of problems and also to c1arify the conception of the relationships of the various engine-propeller design factors. It is shown that, among the many methods for improving the take-off thrust, the use of high-pitch, large-diameter controllable propellers turning at low rotational speeds is probably the most generally promising. With such a combination the take-off thrust may be further increased, at the expense of a small loss in cruising efficiency, by compromise designs wherein the pitch setting is slightly reduced and the diameter is further increased. The degree of compromise necessary to accomplish the maximum possible take-off improvement depends on such design factors as overspeeding and overboosting at take-off as well as depending on the design altitude. Both overspeeding and designing for altitude operation have the same effect on the take-off thrust as compromising in that the propulsive efficiency is increased thereby; boosting the engine, however, has the reverse effect on the propulsive efficiency, although the brake horsepower is increased.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Relative Hydrodynamic Resistance of Various Types of Rivet Heads from Tests of Planning Surfaces, Special Report

The Relative Hydrodynamic Resistance of Various Types of Rivet Heads from Tests of Planning Surfaces, Special Report

Date: July 1, 1935
Creator: Truscott, Starr & Parksinson, John B.
Description: The Committee was requested to investigate the effect of various types of rivet heads on hydrodynamic resistance. The proposal was made to obtain the resistance of the various types of rivets by tests of planing surfaces on which the full size rivets would be arranged. The testing methods, results and conclusions are given.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Remote Indicating Hinge-Moment Balance, Special Report

A Remote Indicating Hinge-Moment Balance, Special Report

Date: August 1, 1941
Creator: Stoller, Morton J. & Ribner, Herbert S.
Description: This report describes an electrical hinge-moment balance for use with wind-tunnel models of aircraft. A brief description of the principle of operation and operating experience with the balance is given in part I. Part II gives constructional details and part III gives theoretical considerations. Extensive constructional information is given to enable the reproduction of the equipment.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Restraint Provided a Flat Rectangular Plate by a Sturdy Stiffener Along an Edge of the Plate, Special Report

Restraint Provided a Flat Rectangular Plate by a Sturdy Stiffener Along an Edge of the Plate, Special Report

Date: May 1, 1941
Creator: Lundquist, Eugene E. & Stowell, Elbridge Z.
Description: A sturdy stiffener is defined as a stiffener of such proportions that it does not suffer cross-sectional distortion when moments are applied to some part of the cross section. When such a stiffener is attached to one edge of a plate, it will resist rotation of that edge of the plate by means of its torsional properties. A formula is given for the restraint coefficient provided the plate by such a stiffener. This coefficient is required for the calculation of the critical compressive stress of the plate.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Resume of Present Data on Load Distribution on Slots and Flaps, Special Report

Resume of Present Data on Load Distribution on Slots and Flaps, Special Report

Date: April 1, 1934
Creator: Wenzinger, Carl J.
Description: This report covers a study of the generally available data on load distribution on slots and flaps. The study was made by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at the request of the Material Division, Army Air Corps to furnish information applicable to design criteria for slots and flaps of various types. The data are presented in three main sections: slots (Handley page type), auxiliary airfoils (fixed), and flaps.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Stability of Castering Wheels for Aircraft Landing Gears, Special Report

Stability of Castering Wheels for Aircraft Landing Gears, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1937
Creator: Kantrowitz, Arthur
Description: In many installations of castering rubber-tired wheels there is a tendency for the wheel to oscillate violently about the spindle axis. This phenomenon, popularly called 'shimmy,' has occurred in some airplane tail wheels and has been corrected in two ways: first by the application of friction in the spindles of the tail wheels; and, second, by locking the wheels while taxiing at high speeds. Shimmy is common with the large wheels used as nose wheels in tricycle landing gears and, since it is impossible to lock the wheels, friction in the nose-wheel spindle has been the sole means of correction. Because the nose wheel is larger than the conventional tail wheel and usually carries a greater load, the larger amounts of spindle friction necessary to prevent shimmy are objectionable. the present paper presents a theoretical and experimental study of the problem of the stability of castering wheels for airplane landing gears. On the basis of simplified assumptions induced from experimental observations, a theoretical study has been made of the shimmy of castering wheels. The theory is based on the discovery of a phenomenon called 'kinematic shimmy' and is compared quantitatively with the results of model experiments. Experimental checks, using a ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Statistics of the Bureau Veritas

Statistics of the Bureau Veritas

Date: March 1, 1932
Creator: Volmerange, Andre
Description: Statistics are indispensable factors for the amelioration of safety. Through the reconciliation of accidents which may appear isolated to interested parties, they permit tracking of typical causes of accidents; conversely, they can prevent, after a serious accident due to some fortuitous cause, the taking of incautious measures under the pressure of public opinion, which always inclines to gauge the gravity of the causes by that of the results. Lastly, they permit appraisal of the efficacy of rules in force. We should add that statistics provide an agency of prevention for future accidents. A careful inspection of all signs of malfunction of material quite often prevents the occurrence of an accident. In this respect, many pilot's report, perfectly normal in every way as far as operation is concerned, can reveal much more interesting technical data than an accident, although it does not diminish the importance of statistics. Therefore, from the inception of its aeronautical service, at the end of 1922, the Bureau Veritas has kept annual statistics of all accidents which occurred in French civil aviation. In order to correctly perform their proper function, the statistics must be exact and sufficiently explicit and complete. To be exact, they must bear on ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department