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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Special Report
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Engine Operation in Flight for Minimum Fuel Consumption

Engine Operation in Flight for Minimum Fuel Consumption

Date: November 1, 1939
Creator: Reuter, George
Description: Engine and airplane performance data have been gathered from various sources and analyzed to determine indications of the most economical methods of flight operation from a consideration of fuel expenditure. The analysis includes the influence of such facts as fuel-air ratio, engine speed, engine knock, altitude, cylinder cooling, spark timing, and limits of cruising brake mean effective pressure. The results indicate that the cheapest power is obtained with approximately correct mixture at low engine speed and highest permissible manifold pressure. If more power is desired, the methods of obtaining it are, in order of fuel economy: (a) increasing the engine speed and maintaining safe cylinder temperatures by cooling; (b) retarding the spark or cooling further to permit higher manifold pressure; and, (c) riching the mixture. The analysis further shows that the maximum time endurance of flight occurs at the air speed corresponding to minimum thrust horsepower required and with minimum practicable engine speed. Maximum mileage per pound of fuel is obtained at slightly higher air speed. The fuel-air ratio should be approximately the theoretically correct ratio in both cases. For an engine equipped with a geared supercharger, as in the example presented, and with knock as the limiting condition, a ...
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Estimated Effect of Ring Cowl on the Climb and Ceiling of an Airplane, Special Report

Estimated Effect of Ring Cowl on the Climb and Ceiling of an Airplane, Special Report

Date: June 1, 1931
Creator: Louden, F. A.
Description: Although the application of a ring cowl to an airplane with an air-cooled engine increases the maximum L/D and the high speed to an appreciable extent, the performance in climb and ceiling is not increased as much as one would expect without analyzing the conditions. When a ring cowl is installed on an airplane, the propeller is set at a higher pitch to allow the engine to turn its rated r.p.m. at the increased high speed. V/nD is increased and the propeller efficiency at high speed is increased slightly. The ratio of r.p.m. at climbing speed, V(sub c) , to the r.p.m. at maximum speed, V (sub m) is dependent upon the ratio of V(sub c) to V(sub m). The increase in V(sub c) for all airplane with ring cowl i s not as great as the increase in V(sub m), so that the ratio V(sub c)/V(sub m) is less than for the airplane without ring. Consequently the r.p.m. and full throttle thrust power available are less at V(sub c) for the airplane with ring cowl and in spite of the increase in L/D due to the installation of the ring, the excess thrust power available for climbing is not ...
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Experimental Determination of Exhaust Gas Thrust, Special Report

Experimental Determination of Exhaust Gas Thrust, Special Report

Date: February 1, 1940
Creator: Pinkel, Benjamin
Description: This investigation presents the results of tests made on a radial engine to determine the thrust that can be obtained from the exhaust gas when discharged from separate stacks and when discharged from the collector ring with various discharge nozzles. The engine was provided with a propeller to absorb the power and was mounted on a test stand equipped with scales for measuring the thrust and engine torque. The results indicate that at full open throttle at sea level, for the engine tested, a gain in thrust horsepower of 18 percent using separate stacks, and 9.5 percent using a collector ring and discharge nozzle, can be expected at an air speed of 550 miles per hour.
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Experimental investigation of a new type of low-drag wing-nacelle combination

Experimental investigation of a new type of low-drag wing-nacelle combination

Date: July 1, 1942
Creator: Allen, H. J. & Frick, C. W., Jr.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experiments on the Recovery of Waste Heat in Cooling Ducts, Special Report

Experiments on the Recovery of Waste Heat in Cooling Ducts, Special Report

Date: May 1, 1939
Creator: Silverstein, Abe
Description: Tests have been conducted in the N.A.C.A. full-scale wind tunnel to investigate the partial recovery of the heat energy which is apparently wasted in the cooling of aircraft engines. The results indicate that if the radiator is located in an expanded duct, a part of the energy lost in cooling is recovered; however, the energy recovery is not of practical importance up to airplane speeds of 400 miles per hour. Throttling of the duct flow occurs with heated radiators and must be considered in designing the duct outlets from data obtained with cold radiators in the ducts.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Flight Investigation of Exhaust-Heat De-Icing, Special Report

A Flight Investigation of Exhaust-Heat De-Icing, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1940
Creator: Rodert, Lewis A.
Description: The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics has conducted exhaust-heat de-icing tests inflight t o provide data needed in the application of this method of ice prevention. Thc capacity to extract heat from the exhaust gas for de-icing purposes, the quantity of heat required, and other factors were examined. The results indicate that a wing-heating system employing a spanwise exhaust tube within the leading edge of the wing will make available for de-icing purposes between 30 and 35 percent of the exhaust-gas heat. Data are given by which the heat required for ice prevention can be calculated. Sample calculations have been made, on a basis of existing engine power over wing area ratios, to show that sufficient heating can be obtained for ice protection on modern transport airplanes,.
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Flight Measurements of the Aileron Characteristics of a Grumman F4F-3 Airplane

Flight Measurements of the Aileron Characteristics of a Grumman F4F-3 Airplane

Date: September 1, 1942
Creator: Kleckner, Harold F.
Description: The aileron characteristics of a Grumman F4F-3 airplane were determined in flight by means of NACA recording and indicating instruments. The results show that the ailerons met NACA minimum requirements for satisfactory control throughout a limited speed range. A helix angle of approximately 0.07 radian was produced with flaps down at speeds from 90 to 115 miles per hour indicated airspeed and with flaps up from 115 to 200 miles per hour. With flaps up at 90 miles per hour, the helix angle dropped to 0.055 radian; above 200 miles per hour heavy aileron stick forces seriously restricted maneuverability in roll.
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Flight Tests of Exhaust Gas Jet Propulsion, Special Report

Flight Tests of Exhaust Gas Jet Propulsion, Special Report

Date: November 1, 1940
Creator: Pnkel, Benjamin
Description: Flight test s were conducted on the XP-41 airplane, equipped with a Pratt & Whitney R1830-19, 14-cylinder, air-cooled engine, to determine the increase in flight speed obtainable by the use of individual exhaust stacks directed rearwardly to obtain exhaust-gas thrust. Speed increases up to 18 miles per hour at 20,000 feet altitude were obtained using stacks having an exit area of 3.42 square inches for each cylinder. A slight increase in engine power and decrease in cylinder temperature at a given manifold pressure were obtained with the individual stacks as compared with a collector-ring installation. Exhaust-flame visibility was quite low, particularly in the rich range of fuel-air ratios.
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Flight Tests on the Lateral Control of an Airplane having a Split Flap which Retracts Ahead of Conventional Ailerons, Special Report

Flight Tests on the Lateral Control of an Airplane having a Split Flap which Retracts Ahead of Conventional Ailerons, Special Report

Date: December 1, 1933
Creator: Weick, Fred E.
Description: Since the recent more or less extensive adoption of high-lift flaps on airplane wings, the problem of providing satisfactory lateral control without sacrificing a part of the span of the flaps has become one of some importance. The difficulties have been largely a matter of obtaining satisfactory rolling moments with a smoothly graduated action, together with sufficiently small control forces throughout the entire speed range. As part of an investigation including several different lateral-control arrangements to be used with split flaps, the tests reported in this paper were made on one arrangement in which conventional ailerons of narrow chord are used, and a split flap is retracted into the under surface of th wing forward of th ailerons. When the flap is retracted, the arrangement is as sketched in figure 1(a). If a simple form of split flap were used, hinged at its forward edge, the appearance when deflected would be as shown in figure 1(b). The flap if deflected with its leading edge remaining in this forward position would give somewhat less than three fourths of the lift increase of the same flap in the usual rear position. (See reference 1.). If, as shown in figure 1(c), the split ...
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Full-Scale Tests of 4- and 6-Blade, Single- and Dual-Rotating Propellers, Special Report

Full-Scale Tests of 4- and 6-Blade, Single- and Dual-Rotating Propellers, Special Report

Date: August 1, 1940
Creator: Biermann, David
Description: Test of 10-foot diameter, 4- and 6-blade single- and dual-rotating propellers were conducted in the 20-foot propeller-research tunnel. The propellers were mounted at the front end of a streamline body incorporating spinners to house the hub portions. The effect of a symmetrical wing mounted in the slipstream was investigated. The blade angles investigated ranged from 20 degrees to 65 degrees; the latter setting corresponds to airplane speeds of over 500 miles per hour. The results indicate that dual-rotating propellers were from 0 to 6% more efficient than single-rotating ones; but when operating in the presence of a wing the gain was reduced about one-half. Other advantages of dual-rotating propellers were found to include greater power absorption and greater efficiency at the low V/nD operating range of high pitch propellers.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department