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 Serial/Series Title: NACA Special Report
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. II - Lap Joints, 2, Lap Joints

The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. II - Lap Joints, 2, Lap Joints

Date: February 1, 1938
Creator: Hood, Manley J.
Description: Tests have been made in the NACA 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel of the drag caused by four types of lap joint. The tests were made on an airfoil of NACA 23012 section and 5-foot chord and covered in a range of speeds from 80 to 500 miles per hour and lift coefficients from 0 to 0.30. The increases in profile drag caused by representative arrangements of laps varied from 4 to 9%. When there were protruding rivet heads on the surface, the addition of laps increased the drag only slightly. Laps on the forward part of a wing increased the drag considerably more than those farther back.
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The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. IV - Manufacturing Irregularities, 5, Manufacturing Irregularities

The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. IV - Manufacturing Irregularities, 5, Manufacturing Irregularities

Date: February 1, 1938
Creator: Robinson, Russell G.
Description: Tests were made in the NACA 8-foot high speed wind tunnel of a metal-covered, riveted, 'service' wing of average workmanship to determine the aerodynamic effects of the manufacturing irregularities incident to shop fabrication. The wing was of 5-foot chord and of NACA 23012 section and was tested in the low-lift range at speeds from 90 to 450 miles per hour corresponding to Reynolds numbers from 4,000,000 to 18,000,000. At a cruising condition the drag of the service wing was 46% higher than the drag of a smooth airfoil, whereas the drag of an accurately constructed airfoil having the same arrangement of 3/32-inch brazier-head rivets and lap joints showed a 29% increase. The difference, or 17% of the smooth-wing drag, is apparently the drag caused by the manufacturing irregularities: sheet waviness, departures from true profile, and imperfect laps. the service wing, for one condition at least, showed a drag increase due to compressibility at a lower air speed than did the more accurate airfoil.
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Correction of Profile-Drag Results from Variable-Density Tunnel and the Effect on the Choice of Wing-Section Thickness

Correction of Profile-Drag Results from Variable-Density Tunnel and the Effect on the Choice of Wing-Section Thickness

Date: March 1, 1938
Creator: Jacobs, Eastman N.
Description: Profile-drag coefficients published from tests in the N.A.C.A. variable-density tunnel (Technical Reports Nos. 460, 537, 586, and 610, references 1 to 4) have tended to appear high as compared with results from the N.A.C.A. full-scale tunnel (Technical Report No. 530, reference 5) and from foreign sources (references 6 to 8). Such discrepancies were considered in Technical Report No. 586, and corrections for turbulence and tip effects were derived that tended to reduce the profile-drag coefficients, particularly for the thicker airfoils. The corrected profile-drag coefficients, designated by the lower-case symbol cdo as contrasted with the older CDO, have been employed in the airfoil reports published since Technical Report No. 460, but even these corrected results continued to appear high, particularly for the thicker sections. The important practical result is that a smaller increase of drag with airfoil thickness is indicated, which may be of primary importance to the airplane designer in choosing the optimum airfoil sections for actual wings. Further investigations of this subject were, of course, undertaken, one of the most important being an investigation of three symmetrical sections N.A.C A. 0009, 0012, and 0018 under conditions of low turbulence in the full-scale tunnel. Preliminary results from this investigation also ...
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Preliminary Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing Ducts for Radiators, Special Report

Preliminary Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing Ducts for Radiators, Special Report

Date: March 1, 1938
Creator: Silverstein, Abe & Nickle, F. R.
Description: Wing ducts for liquid-cooled engine radiators have been investigated in the N.A.C.A. full-scale wind tunnel on a large model airplane. The tests were made to determine the relative merits of several types of duct and radiator installations for an airplane of a particular design. In the test program the principal duct dimensions were systematically varied, and the results are therefore somewhat applicable to the general problems of wing duct design, although they should be considered as preliminary and only indicative of the inherent possibilities.
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The Torsional and Bending Deflection of Full-Scale Duralumin Propeller Blades under Normal Operating Conditions, Special Report

The Torsional and Bending Deflection of Full-Scale Duralumin Propeller Blades under Normal Operating Conditions, Special Report

Date: March 1, 1938
Creator: Hartman, Edwin P. & Biermann, David
Description: The torsional deflection of the blades of three full-scale duralumin propellers operating under various loading conditions was measured by a light-beam method. Angular bending deflections were also obtained as an incidental part of the study. The deflection measurements showed that the usual present-day type of propeller blades twisted but a negligible amount under ordinary flight conditions. A maximum deflection of about 1/10th of a degree was found at V/nD of 0.3 and a smaller deflection at higher values of V/nD for the station at 0.70 radius. These deflections are much smaller than would be expected from earlier tests, but the light-beam method is considered to be much more accurate than the direct-reading transit method used in the previous tests.
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Investigation in the 7-By-10 Foot Wind Tunnel of Ducts for Cooling Radiators Within an Airplane Wing, Special Report

Investigation in the 7-By-10 Foot Wind Tunnel of Ducts for Cooling Radiators Within an Airplane Wing, Special Report

Date: July 1, 1938
Creator: Harris, Thomas A. & Recant, Isidore G.
Description: An investigation was made in the NACA 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel of a large-chord wing model with a duct to house a simulated radiator suitable for a liquid-cooled engine. The duct was expanded to reduce the radiator losses, and the installation of the duct and radiator was made entirely within the wing to reduce form and interference drag. The tests were made using a two-dimensional flow set-up with a full-span duct and radiator. Section aerodynamic characteristics of the basic airfoil are given and also curves showing the characteristics of the various duct-radiator combinations. An expression for efficiency, the primary criterion of merit of any duct, and the effect of the several design parameters of the duct-radiator arrangement are discussed. The problem of throttling is considered and a discussion of the power required for cooling is included. It was found that radiators could be mounted in the wing and efficiently pass enough air for cooling with duct outlets located at any point from 0.25c to 0.70c from the wing leading edge on the upper surface. The duct-inlet position was found to be critical and, for maximum efficiency, had to be at the stagnation point of the airfoil and to change ...
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Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing Cooling Ducts, Special Report

Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing Cooling Ducts, Special Report

Date: October 1, 1938
Creator: Nickle, F. R. & Freeman, Arthur B.
Description: The systematic investigation of wing cooling ducts at the NACA laboratory has been continued with tests in the full-scale wind tunnel on ducts of finite span. These results extend the previous investigation on section characteristics of ducts to higher Reynolds numbers and indicate the losses due to the duct ends. The data include comparisons between ducts completely within the ring and the conventional underslung ducts. Methods of flow regulation were studied and data were obtained for a wide range of internal duct resistance. The results show satisfactory correlation between the finite span and the previously measured section characteristics obtained with full-span ducts. The effects of the various design parameters on the duct characteristics are discussed. The cooling power required for the internal duct installation is shown to be only a small percentage of the engine power.
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Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Air Inlet and Outlet Openings for Aircraft, Special Report

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Air Inlet and Outlet Openings for Aircraft, Special Report

Date: October 1, 1938
Creator: Rogallo, Francis M. & Gauvain, William E.
Description: An investigation was made in the NACA 5-foot vertical wind tunnel of a large variety of duct inlets and outlets to obtain information relative to their design for the cooling or the ventilation systems on aircraft. Most of the tests were of openings in a flat plate but, in order to determine the best locations and the effects of interference, a few tests were made of openings in an airfoil. The best inlet location for a system not including a blower was found to be at the forward stagnation point; for one including a blower, the best location was found to be in the region of lowest total head, probably in the boundary layer near the trailing edge. Design recommendations are given, and it is shown that correct design demands a knowledge of the external flow and of the internal requirements in addition to that obtained from the results of the wind tunnel tests.
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Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an N.A.C.A. 23012 Airfoil with a Slotted Flap and Three Types of Auxiliary Flap

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an N.A.C.A. 23012 Airfoil with a Slotted Flap and Three Types of Auxiliary Flap

Date: December 1, 1938
Creator: Wenzinger, Carl J. & Gauvain, Wiliam E.
Description: An investigation was made in the N.A.C.A. 7- by 10- foot wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic section characteristics of an N. A. C. A. 23012 airfoil with a single main slotted flap equipped successively with auxiliary flaps of the plain, split, and slotted types. A test installation mas used in which an airfoil of 7-foot span was mounted vertically between the upper and the lower sides of the closed test section so that two-dimensional flow was approximated. On the basis of maximum lift coefficient, low drag at moderate and high lift coefficients, and high drag at high lift coefficients, the optimum combination of the arrangements was found to be the double slotted flap . All the auxiliary flaps tested, however, increased the magnitudes of the pitching moments over those of the main slotted flap alone.
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Interference of Tail Surfaces and Wing and Fuselage from Tests of 17 Combinations in the N.A.C.A. Variable-Density Tunnel

Interference of Tail Surfaces and Wing and Fuselage from Tests of 17 Combinations in the N.A.C.A. Variable-Density Tunnel

Date: January 1, 1939
Creator: Sherman, Albert
Description: An investigation of the interference associated with tail surfaces added to wing-fuselage combinations was included in the interference program in progress in the NACA variable-density tunnel. The results indicate that, in aerodynamically clean combinations, the increment to the high-speed drag can be estimated from section characteristics within useful limits of accuracy. The interference appears mainly as effects on the downwash angel and as losses in the tail. An interference burble, which markedly increases the glide-path angle and the stability in pitch before the actual stall, may be considered a means of obtaining satisfactory stalling characteristics for a complete combination.
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Preliminary Model Tests of a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

Preliminary Model Tests of a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

Date: February 1, 1939
Creator: Biermann, David & Valentine, E. Floyd
Description: Wind-tunnel tests were conducted on a model wing-nacelle combination to determine the practicability of cooling radial engines by forcing the cooling air into wing-duct entrances located in the propeller slipstream, passing the air through the engine baffles from rear to front, and ejecting the air through an annular slot near the front of the nacelle. The tests, which were of a preliminary nature, were made on a 5-foot-chord wing and a 20-inch-diameter nacelle. A 3-blade, 4-foot-diameter propeller was used. The tests indicated that this method of cooling and cowling radial engines is entirely practicable providing the wing of the prospective airplane is sufficiently thick to accommodate efficient entrance ducts , The drag of the cowlings tested was definitely less than for the conventional N.A.C.A. cowling, and the pressure available at low air speed corresponding to operation on the ground and at low flying speeds was apparently sufficient for cooling most present-day radial engines.
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Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing-Cooling Ducts Effects of Propeller Slipstream, Special Report

Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing-Cooling Ducts Effects of Propeller Slipstream, Special Report

Date: March 1, 1939
Creator: Nickle, F. R. & Freeman, Arthur B.
Description: The safety of remotely operated vehicles depends on the correctness of the distributed protocol that facilitates the communication between the vehicle and the operator. A failure in this communication can result in catastrophic loss of the vehicle. To complicate matters, the communication system may be required to satisfy several, possibly conflicting, requirements. The design of protocols is typically an informal process based on successive iterations of a prototype implementation. Yet distributed protocols are notoriously difficult to get correct using such informal techniques. We present a formal specification of the design of a distributed protocol intended for use in a remotely operated vehicle, which is built from the composition of several simpler protocols. We demonstrate proof strategies that allow us to prove properties of each component protocol individually while ensuring that the property is preserved in the composition forming the entire system. Given that designs are likely to evolve as additional requirements emerge, we show how we have automated most of the repetitive proof steps to enable verification of rapidly changing designs.
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Investigation of an Electrically Heated Airplane Windshield for Ice Prevention, Special Report

Investigation of an Electrically Heated Airplane Windshield for Ice Prevention, Special Report

Date: March 1, 1939
Creator: Rodert, Lewis A.
Description: A study was made at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Laboratory of the operation of an electrically heated glass panel, which simulated a segment of an airplane windshield, to determine if ice formations, which usually result in the loss of visibility, could be prevented. Tests were made in the 7- by 3-foot ice tunnel, and in flight, under artificially created ice-forming conditions. Ice was prevented from forming on the windshield model in the tunnel by 1.25 watts of power per square inch with the air temperature at 23 F and a velocity of 80 miles per hour. Using an improved model in flight, ice was prevented by 1.43 watts of power per square inch of protected area and 2 watts per inch concentrated in the rim, with the air temperature at 26 F and a velocity of 120 miles per hour. The removal of a preformed ice cap was effected to a limited extent in the tunnel by the use of 1.89 watts of power per square inch when the temperature and velocity were 25 F and 80 miles per hour, respectively. The results indicate that service tests with an improved design are justified.
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High-Speed Tests of Radial-Engine Cowlings

High-Speed Tests of Radial-Engine Cowlings

Date: April 1, 1939
Creator: Robinson, Russell G. & Becker, John V.
Description: The drag characteristics of eight radial-engine cowlings have been determined over a wide speed range in the N.A.C.A. 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel. The pressure distribution over all cowlings was measured, to and above the speed of the compressibility burble, as an aid in interpreting the force tests. One-fifth-scale models of radial-engine cowlings on a wing-nacelle combination mere used in the tests.
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Experiments on the Recovery of Waste Heat in Cooling Ducts, Special Report

Experiments on the Recovery of Waste Heat in Cooling Ducts, Special Report

Date: May 1, 1939
Creator: Silverstein, Abe
Description: Tests have been conducted in the N.A.C.A. full-scale wind tunnel to investigate the partial recovery of the heat energy which is apparently wasted in the cooling of aircraft engines. The results indicate that if the radiator is located in an expanded duct, a part of the energy lost in cooling is recovered; however, the energy recovery is not of practical importance up to airplane speeds of 400 miles per hour. Throttling of the duct flow occurs with heated radiators and must be considered in designing the duct outlets from data obtained with cold radiators in the ducts.
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Radiator Design and Installation

Radiator Design and Installation

Date: May 1, 1939
Creator: Brevoort, M.J. & Leifer, M.
Description: The fundamental principles of fluid flow, pressure losses, and heat transfer have been presented and analyzed for the case of a smooth tube with fully developed turbulent flow. These equations apply to tubes with large length-diameter ratios where the f1ow is at a high Reynolds Number. The error introduced by using these equations increases as the magnitude of the tube length and the air-flow Reynolds Number approaches the values encountered in modern radiator designs. Accordingly, heat-transfer tests on radiator sections were made and the results are presented in nondimensional form to facilitate their use and for comparison with other heat-transfer data. In addition, pressure losses were measured along smooth tubes of circular, square, and rectangular cross section and the results were also correlated and are presented in nondimensional form. The problem of a radiator design for a particular installation is solved, the experimental heat-transfer and pressure-loss data being used, on a basis of power chargeable to the radiator for form drag, for propelling the weight, and for forcing the air through the radiator. The case of an installation within a wing or an engine nacelle is considered. An illustration of radiator design is carried through for an arbitrary set of ...
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The Calculated Effect of Various Hydrodynamic and Aerodynamic Factors on the Take-Off of a Large Flying Boat

The Calculated Effect of Various Hydrodynamic and Aerodynamic Factors on the Take-Off of a Large Flying Boat

Date: June 1, 1939
Creator: Olson, R.E. & Allison, J.M.
Description: Present designs for large flying boats are characterized by high wing loading, high aspect ratio, and low parasite drag. The high wing loading results in the universal use of flaps for reducing the takeoff and landing speeds. These factors have an effect on takeoff performance and influence to a certain extent the design of the hull. An investigation was made of the influence of various factors and design parameters on the takeoff performance of a hypothetical large flying boat by means of takeoff calculations. The parameters varied in the calculations were size of hull (load coefficient), wing setting, trim, deflection of flap, wing loading, aspect ratio, and parasite drag. The takeoff times and distances were calculated to the stalling speeds and the performance above these speeds was studied separately to determine piloting technique for optimum takeoff. The advantage of quick deflection of the flap at high water speeds is shown.
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An Investigation of the Drag of Windshields in the 8-Foot High-Speed Wind Tunnel

An Investigation of the Drag of Windshields in the 8-Foot High-Speed Wind Tunnel

Date: June 1, 1939
Creator: Robinson, Russell G. & Delano, James B.
Description: The drag of closed-cockpit and transport-type windshields was determined from tests made at speeds from 200 to 440 miles per hour in the NACA 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel. This speed range corresponds to a test Reynolds number range of 2,510,000 to 4,830,000 based on the mean aerodynamic chord of the full-span model (17.29 inches). The shapes of the windshield proper, the hood, and the tail fairing were systematically varied to include common types and a refined design. Transport types varied from a reproduction of a current type to a completely faired windshield. The results show that the drag of windshields of the same frontal area, on airplanes of small to medium size, may account for 15% of the airplane drag or may be reduced to 1%. Optimum values are given for windshield and tail-fairing lengths; the effect, at various radii is shown. The longitudinal profile of a windshield is shown to be most important and the transverse profile, to be much less important. The effects of retaining strips, of steps for telescoping hoods, and of recessed windows are determined. The results show that the drag of transport-type windshields may account for 21% of the fuselage drag or may be reduced ...
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Preliminary Tests of Blowers of Three Designs Operating in Conjunction with a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

Preliminary Tests of Blowers of Three Designs Operating in Conjunction with a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

Date: June 1, 1939
Creator: Biermann, David & Valentine, E. Floyd
Description: This paper is one of several dealing with methods intended to reduce the drag of present-day radial engine installations and improve the cooling at zero and low air speeds, The present paper describes model wind-tunnel tests of blowers of three designs tested in conjunction with a wing-nacelle combination. The principle of operation involved consists of drawing cooling air into ducts located in the wing root at the point of maximum slipstream velocity, passing the air through the engine baffles from rear to front, and exhausting the air through an annular slot located between the propeller and the engine with the aid of a blower mounted on the spinner. The test apparatus consisted essentially of a stub wing having a 5-foot chord and a 15-foot span, an engine nacelle of 20 inches diameter enclosing a 25-horsepower electric motor, and three blowers mounted on propeller spinners. Two of the blowers utilize centrifugal force while the other uses the lift from airfoils to force the air out radially through the exit slot. Maximum efficiencies of over 70 percent were obtained for the system as a whole. Pressures were measured over the entire flight range which were in excess of those necessary to cool ...
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Tests of Airfoils Designed to Delay the Compressibility Burble

Tests of Airfoils Designed to Delay the Compressibility Burble

Date: June 1, 1939
Creator: Stack, John
Description: Development of airfoil sections suitable for high-speed applications has generally been difficult because little was known of the flow phenomenon that occurs at high speeds. A definite critical speed has been found at which serious detrimental flow changes occur that lead to serious losses in lift and large increases in drag. This flow phenomenon, called the compressibility burble, was originally a propeller problem, but with the development of higher speed aircraft serious consideration must be given to other parts of the airplane. Fundamental investigations of high-speed airflow phenomenon have provided new information. An important conclusion of this work has been the determination of the critical speed, that is, the speed at which the compressibility burble occurs. The critical speed was shown to be the translational velocity at which the sum of the translational velocity and the maximum local induced velocity at the surface of the airfoil or other body equals the local speed of sound. Obviously then higher critical speeds can be attained through the development of airfoils that have minimum induced velocity for any given value of the lift coefficient. Presumably, the highest critical speed will be attained by an airfoil that has uniform chordwise distribution of induced velocity ...
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Preliminary Tests of Nose- and Side- Entrance Blower Cooling Systems for Radial Engines, Special Report

Preliminary Tests of Nose- and Side- Entrance Blower Cooling Systems for Radial Engines, Special Report

Date: July 1, 1939
Creator: Biermann, David & Valentine, E. Floyd
Description: Two cowling systems intended to reduce the drag and improve the low-speed cooling characteristics of conventional radial engine cowlings were tested in model form to determine the practicability of the methods. One cowling included a blower mounted on the rear face of a large propeller spinner which drew cooling air in through side entrance ducts located behind the equivalent engine orifice plate. The air was passed through the equivalent engine orifice plate from rear to front and out through a slot between the spinner and the engine plate. The blower produced substantially all the power necessary to circulate the cooling air in some cases, so the quantity of air flowing was independent of the air speed, Two types of blowers were used, a centrifugal type and one using airfoil blades which forced the air outward from the center of rotation. The other cowling was similar to the conventional N.A.C.A. cowling except for the addition of a large propeller spinner nose. The spinner was provided with a hole in the nose to admit cooling air and blower blades to increase the pressure for cooling at low speeds. The tests show that with both cowling types the basic drag of the nacelle ...
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Drag and Propulsive Characteristics of Air-Cooled Engine-Nacelle Installations for Large Airplanes, Special Report

Drag and Propulsive Characteristics of Air-Cooled Engine-Nacelle Installations for Large Airplanes, Special Report

Date: August 1, 1939
Creator: Silverstein, Abe & Wilson, Herbert A., Jr.
Description: An investigation is in progress in the NACA full-scale wind tunnel to determine the drag and propulsive efficiency of nacelle sizes. In contrast with the usual tests with a single nacelle, these tests were conducted with nacelle-propeller installations on a large model of a 4-engine airplane. Data are presented on the first part of the investigation, covering seven nacelle arrangements with nacelle diameters from 0.53 to 1.5 times the wing thickness. These ratios are similar to those occurring on airplane weighing from about 20 to 100 tons. The results show that the drag, the propulsive efficiency, and the overall efficiency of the various nacelle arrangements as functions of the nacelle size, the propeller position, and the airplane lift coefficient. The effect of the nacelles on the aerodynamic characteristics of the model are shown for both propeller-removed and propeller-operating conditions.
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Preliminary Investigation of Certain Laminar-Flow Airfoils for Application at High Speeds and Reynolds Numbers

Preliminary Investigation of Certain Laminar-Flow Airfoils for Application at High Speeds and Reynolds Numbers

Date: August 1, 1939
Creator: Jacobs, E.N.; Abbott, Ira H. & von Doenhoff, A.E.
Description: In order to extend the useful range of Reynolds numbers of airfoils designed to take advantage of the extensive laminar boundary layers possible in an air stream of low turbulence, tests were made of the NACA 2412-34 and 1412-34 sections in the NACA low-turbulence tunnel. Although the possible extent of the laminar boundary layer on these airfoils is not so great as for specially designed laminar-flow airfoils, it is greater than that for conventional airfoils, and is sufficiently extensive so that at Reynolds numbers above 11,000,000 the laminar region is expected to be limited by the permissible 'Reynolds number run' and not by laminar separation as is the case with conventional airfoils. Drag measurements by the wake-survey method and pressure-distribution measurements were made at several lift coefficients through a range of Reynolds numbers up to 11,400,000. The drag scale-effect curve for the NACA 1412-34 is extrapolated to a Reynolds number of 30,000,000 on the basis of theoretical calculations of the skin friction. Comparable skin-friction calculations were made for the NACA 23012. The results indicate that, for certain applications at moderate values of the Reynolds number, the NACA 1412-34 and 2412-34 airfoils offer some advantages over such conventional airfoils as the ...
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An Electrical-Type Indicating Fuel Flowmeter

An Electrical-Type Indicating Fuel Flowmeter

Date: September 1, 1939
Creator: Tozier, Robert E.
Description: An electrical-type meter has been developed for measuring mass rates of flow of gasoline or other nonconducting fluids. Its temperature dependence is small over a large range and it has no known vibrational or viscosity errors. The maximum temperature rise is less than 5 C. The rates of flow, measurable within 1% with the present instrument, are approximately 100 to 1,000 or more pounds of gasoline per hour when a potentiometer is used, or 100 to 300 pounds per hour when a deflection-type meter is used.
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