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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Special Report
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Restraint Provided a Flat Rectangular Plate by a Sturdy Stiffener Along an Edge of the Plate, Special Report

Restraint Provided a Flat Rectangular Plate by a Sturdy Stiffener Along an Edge of the Plate, Special Report

Date: May 1, 1941
Creator: Lundquist, Eugene E. & Stowell, Elbridge Z.
Description: A sturdy stiffener is defined as a stiffener of such proportions that it does not suffer cross-sectional distortion when moments are applied to some part of the cross section. When such a stiffener is attached to one edge of a plate, it will resist rotation of that edge of the plate by means of its torsional properties. A formula is given for the restraint coefficient provided the plate by such a stiffener. This coefficient is required for the calculation of the critical compressive stress of the plate.
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A Remote Indicating Hinge-Moment Balance, Special Report

A Remote Indicating Hinge-Moment Balance, Special Report

Date: August 1, 1941
Creator: Stoller, Morton J. & Ribner, Herbert S.
Description: This report describes an electrical hinge-moment balance for use with wind-tunnel models of aircraft. A brief description of the principle of operation and operating experience with the balance is given in part I. Part II gives constructional details and part III gives theoretical considerations. Extensive constructional information is given to enable the reproduction of the equipment.
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Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Lift Characteristics of an NACA 27-212 Airfoil Equipped with Two Types of Flap, Special Report

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Lift Characteristics of an NACA 27-212 Airfoil Equipped with Two Types of Flap, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1940
Creator: Swanson, Robert S. & Schuldenfrei, Marvin J.
Description: An investigation has been made in the NACA 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel of a large chord NACA 27-212 airfoil with a 20% chord split flap and with two arrangements of a 25.66% chord slotted flap to determine the section lift characteristics as affected by flap deflection for the split flap and as affected by flap deflection, flap position, and slot shape for the slotted flap. For the two arrangements of the slotted flap, the flap positions for maximum section lift are given. Comparable data on the NACA 23012 airfoil equipped with similar flaps are also given. On the basis of maximum section lift coefficient, the slotted flap with an easy slot entry was slightly better than either the split flap or the slotted flap with a sharp slot entry. With both types of flap the decrease in the angle of attack, for maximum section lift coefficient, with flap deflection is large for the NACA 27-212 airfoil as compared with the NACA 23012 airfoil. Also with both flaps, the maximum section lift coefficient obtained with flaps is much lower for the NACA 27-212 airfoil than for the NACA 23012 airfoil.
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Comparison of Three Exit-Area Control Devices on an N.A.C.A. Cowling, Special Report

Comparison of Three Exit-Area Control Devices on an N.A.C.A. Cowling, Special Report

Date: May 1, 1940
Creator: McHugh, James G.
Description: Adjustable cowling flaps, an adjustable-length cowling skirt, and a bottom opening with adjustable flap were tested as means of controlling the rate of cooling-air flow through an air-cooled radial-engine cowling. The devices were tested in the NACA 20-foot tunnel on a model wing-nacelle-propeller combination, through an airspeed range of 20 to 80 miles per hour, and with the propeller blade angle set 23 degrees at 0.75 of the tip radius. The resistance of the engine to air flow through the cowling was simulated by a perforated plate. The results indicated that the adjustable cowling flap and the bottom opening with adjustable flap were about equally effective on the basis of pressure drop obtainable and that both were more effective means of increasing the pressure drop through the cowling than the adjustable-length skirt. At conditions of equal cooling-air flow, the net efficiency obtained with the adjustable cowling flaps and the adjustable-length cowling skirt was about 1% greater than the net efficiency obtained with the bottom opening with adjustable flap.
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Tests of Wing Machine-Gun and Cannon Installations in the NACA Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, Special Report

Tests of Wing Machine-Gun and Cannon Installations in the NACA Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, Special Report

Date: August 1, 1941
Creator: Czarnecki, K. R. & Guryansky, Eugene R.
Description: At the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, an investigation was conducted in the full-scale wind tunnel of wing installations of .50-caliber machine guns and 20-millimeter cannons. The tests were made to determine the effect of various gun installations on the maximum lift and the high-speed drag of the airplane.
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Wind-tunnel Tests of the NACA 45-125 Airfoil: A Thick Airfoil for High-Speed Airplanes

Wind-tunnel Tests of the NACA 45-125 Airfoil: A Thick Airfoil for High-Speed Airplanes

Date: February 1, 1940
Creator: Delano, James B.
Description: Investigations of the pressure distribution, the profile drag, and the location of transition for a 30-inch-chord 25-percent-thick N.A,C.A. 45-125 airfoil were made in the N.A.C.A 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel for the purpose of aiding in the development of a thick wing for high-speed airplanes. The tests were made at a lift coefficient of 0.1 for Reynolds Numbers from 1,750,000 to 8,690,000, corresponding to speeds from 80 to 440 miles per hour at 59 F. The effect on the profile drag of fixing the transition point was also investigated. The effect of compressibility on the rate of increase of pressure coefficients was found to be greater than that predicted by a simplified theoretical expression for thin wings. The results indicated that, for a lift coefficient of 0.1, the critical speed of the N.A.C,A. 45-125 airfoil was about 460 miles per hour at 59 F,. The value of the profile-drag coefficient at a Reynolds Number of 4,500,000 was 0.0058, or about half as large as the value for the N.A,C,A. 0025 airfoil. The increase in the profile-drag coefficient for a given movement of the transition point was about three times as large as the corresponding increase for the N.A.C,A. 0012 airfoil. Transition ...
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Comparison of Intercooler Characteristics

Comparison of Intercooler Characteristics

Date: May 1, 1941
Creator: Reuter, J. George & Valerino, Michael F.
Description: A method is presented of comparing the performance, weight, and general dimensional characteristics of inter-coolers. The performance and dimensional characteristics covered in the comparisons are cooling effectiveness, pressure drops and weight flows of the charge and cooling air, power losses, volume, frontal area, and width. A method of presenting intercooler data is described in which two types of charts are plotted; (1) A performance chart setting forth all the important characteristics of a given intercooler and (2) a replot of these characteristics for a number of intercoolers intended to assist in making a selection to satisfy a given set of installation conditions. The characteristics of commercial intercoolers obtained from manufacturers' data and of some computed designs are presented on this basis. A standard test procedure and instrumentation are suggested whereby comparable data may be obtained by different testing organizations.
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Compressibility Effects in Aeronautical Engineering

Compressibility Effects in Aeronautical Engineering

Date: August 1, 1941
Creator: Stack, John
Description: Compressible-flow research, while a relatively new field in aeronautics, is very old, dating back almost to the development of the first firearm. Over the last hundred years, researches have been conducted in the ballistics field, but these results have been of practically no use in aeronautical engineering because the phenomena that have been studied have been the more or less steady supersonic condition of flow. Some work that has been done in connection with steam turbines, particularly nozzle studies, has been of value, In general, however, understanding of compressible-flow phenomena has been very incomplete and permitted no real basis for the solution of aeronautical engineering problems in which.the flow is likely to be unsteady because regions of both subsonic and supersonic speeds may occur. In the early phases of the development of the airplane, speeds were so low that the effects of compressibility could be justifiably ignored. During the last war and immediately after, however, propellers exhibited losses in efficiency as the tip speeds approached the speed of sound, and the first experiments of an aeronautical nature were therefore conducted with propellers. Results of these experiments indicated serious losses of efficiency, but aeronautical engineers were not seriously concerned at the ...
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Engine Operation in Flight for Minimum Fuel Consumption

Engine Operation in Flight for Minimum Fuel Consumption

Date: November 1, 1939
Creator: Reuter, George
Description: Engine and airplane performance data have been gathered from various sources and analyzed to determine indications of the most economical methods of flight operation from a consideration of fuel expenditure. The analysis includes the influence of such facts as fuel-air ratio, engine speed, engine knock, altitude, cylinder cooling, spark timing, and limits of cruising brake mean effective pressure. The results indicate that the cheapest power is obtained with approximately correct mixture at low engine speed and highest permissible manifold pressure. If more power is desired, the methods of obtaining it are, in order of fuel economy: (a) increasing the engine speed and maintaining safe cylinder temperatures by cooling; (b) retarding the spark or cooling further to permit higher manifold pressure; and, (c) riching the mixture. The analysis further shows that the maximum time endurance of flight occurs at the air speed corresponding to minimum thrust horsepower required and with minimum practicable engine speed. Maximum mileage per pound of fuel is obtained at slightly higher air speed. The fuel-air ratio should be approximately the theoretically correct ratio in both cases. For an engine equipped with a geared supercharger, as in the example presented, and with knock as the limiting condition, a ...
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Experiments on the Recovery of Waste Heat in Cooling Ducts, Special Report

Experiments on the Recovery of Waste Heat in Cooling Ducts, Special Report

Date: May 1, 1939
Creator: Silverstein, Abe
Description: Tests have been conducted in the N.A.C.A. full-scale wind tunnel to investigate the partial recovery of the heat energy which is apparently wasted in the cooling of aircraft engines. The results indicate that if the radiator is located in an expanded duct, a part of the energy lost in cooling is recovered; however, the energy recovery is not of practical importance up to airplane speeds of 400 miles per hour. Throttling of the duct flow occurs with heated radiators and must be considered in designing the duct outlets from data obtained with cold radiators in the ducts.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department