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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Special Report
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Paris Aviation Salon, 1934

Paris Aviation Salon, 1934

Date: November 29, 1934
Creator: unknown
Description: This document reviews the Air show held in Paris in 1934. It includes charts and pictures of the aircraft which were from all parts of Europe.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Effect of Lateral Inclination of the Thrust Axis and of Sweepback of the Leading Edge of the Wing on Propulsive and Net Efficiencies of a Wing-Nacelle-Propeller Combination

The Effect of Lateral Inclination of the Thrust Axis and of Sweepback of the Leading Edge of the Wing on Propulsive and Net Efficiencies of a Wing-Nacelle-Propeller Combination

Date: April 1, 1935
Creator: Wood, Donald H.
Description: This report describes and gives the results of tests made to determine the effect of lateral inclination of the propeller thrust axis to the direction of flight. A wing-nacelle-propeller combination with the nacelle axis located successively parallel to and at 15 degrees to the perpendicular to the leading edge of a wing was tested with the combination at several angles of yaw. Tests of the wing alone at the same angles of yaw were also made. The data are presented in the usual graphic form. An increase in propulsive efficiency with increase in angle of the thrust axis was found. The change in net efficiency, found by charging the whole nacelle drag to the power unit, was negligible, however, within the range of the tests.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Large-Scale Boundary-Layer Control Tests on Two Wings in the NACA 20-Foot Wind Tunnel, Special Report

Large-Scale Boundary-Layer Control Tests on Two Wings in the NACA 20-Foot Wind Tunnel, Special Report

Date: April 1, 1935
Creator: Freeman, Hugh B.
Description: Tests were made in the N.A.C.A. 20-foot wind tunnel on: (1) a wing, of 6.5-foot span, 5.5-foot chord, and 30 percent maximum thickness, fitted with large end plates and (2) a 16-foot span 2.67-foot chord wing of 15 percent maximum thickness to determine the increase in lift obtainable by removing the boundary layer and the power required for the blower. The results of the tests on the stub wing appeared more favorable than previous small-scale tests and indicated that: (1) the suction method was considerably superior to the pressure method, (2) single slots were more effective than multiple slots (where the same pressure was applied to all slots), the slot efficiency increased rapidly for increasing slot widths up to 2 percent of the wing chord and remained practically constant for all larger widths tested, (3) suction pressure and power requirements were quite low (a computation for a light airplane showed that a lift coefficient of 3.0 could be obtained with a suction as low as 2.3 times the dynamic pressure and a power expenditure less than 3 percent of the rated engine power), and (4) the volume of air required to be drawn off was quite high (approximately 0.5 cubic ...
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Notes on New French Commercial Airplanes

Notes on New French Commercial Airplanes

Date: April 4, 1935
Creator: unknown
Description: This document discusses the types of commercial planes ordered by Air France. Characteristics of the Wibault 670, the Dewoitine D.620, Bloch 300, and the Potez 620 airplanes are included. Pictures and diagrams of these aircraft are also included.
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The Relative Hydrodynamic Resistance of Various Types of Rivet Heads from Tests of Planning Surfaces, Special Report

The Relative Hydrodynamic Resistance of Various Types of Rivet Heads from Tests of Planning Surfaces, Special Report

Date: July 1, 1935
Creator: Truscott, Starr
Description: The Committee was requested to investigate the effect of various types of rivet heads on hydrodynamic resistance. The proposal was made to obtain the resistance of the various types of rivets by tests of planing surfaces on which the full size rivets would be arranged. The testing methods, results and conclusions are given.
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Ice Prevention on Aircraft by Means of Impregnated Leather Covers, Special Report

Ice Prevention on Aircraft by Means of Impregnated Leather Covers, Special Report

Date: August 1, 1935
Creator: Clay, William C.
Description: The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics is testing the effectiveness of a method to prevent the formation of ice on airplanes. The system makes use of a leather cover that is attached to the leading edge of the wing. A small tube, attached to the inner surface of the leather, distributes to the leading edge a solution that permeates throughout the leather and inhibits the formation of ice on the surface. About 25 pounds of the liquid per hour would be sufficient to prevent ice from forming on a wing of 50-foot span. The additional gross weight of the system will not be excessive. The tests are not yet completed but the method is thought to be practicable for the wing and it may also be adaptable to the propeller.
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Tank Tests of the Effect of Rivet Heads, etc., on the Water Performance of a Seaplane Float, Special Report

Tank Tests of the Effect of Rivet Heads, etc., on the Water Performance of a Seaplane Float, Special Report

Date: June 4, 1936
Creator: Parkinson, J. B.
Description: A 1/3.5 full-size model of the Mark V float of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, was tested in the NACA tank both with smooth painted bottom surfaces and with roundhead rivets, plate laps, and keel plates fitted to simulate the actual bottom of a metal float. The augmentation in water resistance due to the added roughness was found to be from 10-12% at the hum speed and from 12-14% at high speeds. The effect of the roughness of the afterbody was found to be negligible except at high trims. The model data were extrapolated to full size by the usual method which assumes the forces to vary according to Froude's law, and in the case of the smooth model by a method of separation that takes into account the effect of scale on the frictional resistance. It was concluded that the effect of rivet heads on the takeoff performance of a relatively high-powered float seaplane is of little consequence but that it may be of greater importance in the case of more moderately powered flying boats.
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Relative Efficiencies and Design Charts for Various Engine-Propeller Combinations, Special Report

Relative Efficiencies and Design Charts for Various Engine-Propeller Combinations, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1936
Creator: Biermann, David
Description: The relative efficiencies of various engine-propeller combinations were the subject of a study that covered the important flight conditions, particularly the take-off. Design charts that graphically correlate the various propeller parameters were prepared to facilitate the solution of problems and also to c1arify the conception of the relationships of the various engine-propeller design factors. It is shown that, among the many methods for improving the take-off thrust, the use of high-pitch, large-diameter controllable propellers turning at low rotational speeds is probably the most generally promising. With such a combination the take-off thrust may be further increased, at the expense of a small loss in cruising efficiency, by compromise designs wherein the pitch setting is slightly reduced and the diameter is further increased. The degree of compromise necessary to accomplish the maximum possible take-off improvement depends on such design factors as overspeeding and overboosting at take-off as well as depending on the design altitude. Both overspeeding and designing for altitude operation have the same effect on the take-off thrust as compromising in that the propulsive efficiency is increased thereby; boosting the engine, however, has the reverse effect on the propulsive efficiency, although the brake horsepower is increased.
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Accelerations in Landing with a Tricycle-Type Landing Gear

Accelerations in Landing with a Tricycle-Type Landing Gear

Date: February 1, 1937
Creator: Jones, Robert T.
Description: In connection with the application of stable tricycle-type landing gears to transport airplanes, the question arises as to whether certain passengers may not experience relatively great accelerations in an emergency landing. Since the main landing wheels are behind the center of gravity in this type of gear, a hard-braked landing will cause immediate nosing down of the airplane and, when this motion is stopped due to the front wheel striking the ground, there will be some tendency for the rearmost passengers to be thrown out of their seats, The provided rough calculations are designed to show the magnitudes of the various reactions experienced in a severe landing under these circumstances.
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Energy Loss, Velocity Distribution, and Temperature Distribution for a Baffled Cylinder Model, Special Report

Energy Loss, Velocity Distribution, and Temperature Distribution for a Baffled Cylinder Model, Special Report

Date: April 1, 1937
Creator: Brevoort, Maurice J.
Description: In the design of a cowling a certain pressure drop across the cylinders of a radial air-cooled engine is made available. Baffles are designed to make use of this available pressure drop for cooling. The problem of cooling an air-cooled engine cylinder has been treated, for the most part, from considerations of a large heat-transfer coefficient. The knowledge of the precise cylinder characteristics that give a maximum heat-transfer coefficient should be the first consideration. The next problem is to distribute this ability to cool so that the cylinder cools uniformly. This report takes up the problem of the design of a baffle for a model cylinder. A study has been made of the important principles involved in the operation of a baffle for an engine cylinder and shows that the cooling can be improved 20% by using a correctly designed baffle. Such a gain is as effective in cooling the cylinder with the improved baffle as a 65% increase in pressure drop across the standard baffle and fin tips.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department