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 Serial/Series Title: NACA Special Report
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Full-Scale Tests of Several Propellers Equipped with Spinners, Cuffs, Airfoil and Round Shanks, and NACA 16-Series Sections, Special Report

Full-Scale Tests of Several Propellers Equipped with Spinners, Cuffs, Airfoil and Round Shanks, and NACA 16-Series Sections, Special Report

Date: October 1, 1940
Creator: Biermann, David
Description: Wind-tunnel tests of several propeller, cuff, and spinner combinations were conducted in the 20 foot propeller-research tunnel. Three propellers, which ranged in diameter from 8.4 to 11.25 feet, were tested at the front end of a streamline body incorporating spinners of two diameters. The tests covered a blade angle range from 20 deg to 65 deg. The effect of spinner diameter and propeller cuffs on the characteristics of one propeller was determined. Test were also conducted using a propeller which incorporated aerodynamically good shank sections and using one which incorporated the NACA 16 series sections for the outer 20 percent of the blades. Compressibility effects were not measured, owing to the low testing speeds. The results indicated that a conventional propeller was slightly more efficient when tested in conjunction with a 28 inch diameter spinner than with a 23 inch spinner, and that cuffs increased the efficiency as well as the power absorption characteristics. A propeller having good aerodynamic shanks was found to be definitely superior from the efficiency standpoint to a conventional round-shank propeller with or without cuffs; this propeller would probably be considered structurally impracticable, however. The propeller incorporating the NACA 16 series sections at the tims were ...
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Preliminary Model Tests of a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

Preliminary Model Tests of a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

Date: February 1, 1939
Creator: Biermann, David
Description: Wind-tunnel tests were conducted on a model wing-nacelle combination to determine the practicability of cooling radial engines by forcing the cooling air into wing-duct entrances located in the propeller slipstream, passing the air through the engine baffles from rear to front, and ejecting the air through an annular slot near the front of the nacelle. The tests, which were of a preliminary nature, were made on a 5-foot-chord wing and a 20-inch-diameter nacelle. A 3-blade, 4-foot-diameter propeller was used. The tests indicated that this method of cooling and cowling radial engines is entirely practicable providing the wing of the prospective airplane is sufficiently thick to accommodate efficient entrance ducts , The drag of the cowlings tested was definitely less than for the conventional N.A.C.A. cowling, and the pressure available at low air speed corresponding to operation on the ground and at low flying speeds was apparently sufficient for cooling most present-day radial engines.
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Preliminary Tests of Blowers of Three Designs Operating in Conjunction with a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

Preliminary Tests of Blowers of Three Designs Operating in Conjunction with a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

Date: June 1, 1939
Creator: Biermann, David
Description: This paper is one of several dealing with methods intended to reduce the drag of present-day radial engine installations and improve the cooling at zero and low air speeds, The present paper describes model wind-tunnel tests of blowers of three designs tested in conjunction with a wing-nacelle combination. The principle of operation involved consists of drawing cooling air into ducts located in the wing root at the point of maximum slipstream velocity, passing the air through the engine baffles from rear to front, and exhausting the air through an annular slot located between the propeller and the engine with the aid of a blower mounted on the spinner. The test apparatus consisted essentially of a stub wing having a 5-foot chord and a 15-foot span, an engine nacelle of 20 inches diameter enclosing a 25-horsepower electric motor, and three blowers mounted on propeller spinners. Two of the blowers utilize centrifugal force while the other uses the lift from airfoils to force the air out radially through the exit slot. Maximum efficiencies of over 70 percent were obtained for the system as a whole. Pressures were measured over the entire flight range which were in excess of those necessary to cool ...
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Preliminary Tests of Nose- and Side- Entrance Blower Cooling Systems for Radial Engines, Special Report

Preliminary Tests of Nose- and Side- Entrance Blower Cooling Systems for Radial Engines, Special Report

Date: July 1, 1939
Creator: Biermann, David
Description: Two cowling systems intended to reduce the drag and improve the low-speed cooling characteristics of conventional radial engine cowlings were tested in model form to determine the practicability of the methods. One cowling included a blower mounted on the rear face of a large propeller spinner which drew cooling air in through side entrance ducts located behind the equivalent engine orifice plate. The air was passed through the equivalent engine orifice plate from rear to front and out through a slot between the spinner and the engine plate. The blower produced substantially all the power necessary to circulate the cooling air in some cases, so the quantity of air flowing was independent of the air speed, Two types of blowers were used, a centrifugal type and one using airfoil blades which forced the air outward from the center of rotation. The other cowling was similar to the conventional N.A.C.A. cowling except for the addition of a large propeller spinner nose. The spinner was provided with a hole in the nose to admit cooling air and blower blades to increase the pressure for cooling at low speeds. The tests show that with both cowling types the basic drag of the nacelle ...
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Relative Efficiencies and Design Charts for Various Engine-Propeller Combinations, Special Report

Relative Efficiencies and Design Charts for Various Engine-Propeller Combinations, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1936
Creator: Biermann, David
Description: The relative efficiencies of various engine-propeller combinations were the subject of a study that covered the important flight conditions, particularly the take-off. Design charts that graphically correlate the various propeller parameters were prepared to facilitate the solution of problems and also to c1arify the conception of the relationships of the various engine-propeller design factors. It is shown that, among the many methods for improving the take-off thrust, the use of high-pitch, large-diameter controllable propellers turning at low rotational speeds is probably the most generally promising. With such a combination the take-off thrust may be further increased, at the expense of a small loss in cruising efficiency, by compromise designs wherein the pitch setting is slightly reduced and the diameter is further increased. The degree of compromise necessary to accomplish the maximum possible take-off improvement depends on such design factors as overspeeding and overboosting at take-off as well as depending on the design altitude. Both overspeeding and designing for altitude operation have the same effect on the take-off thrust as compromising in that the propulsive efficiency is increased thereby; boosting the engine, however, has the reverse effect on the propulsive efficiency, although the brake horsepower is increased.
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Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Rectangular Air-Duct Entrances in the Leading Edge of an NACA 23018 Wing, Special Report

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Rectangular Air-Duct Entrances in the Leading Edge of an NACA 23018 Wing, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1940
Creator: Biermann, David
Description: A preliminary investigation of a number of duct entrances of rectangular shape installed in the leading edge of a wing was conducted in the NACA 20-foot tunnel to determine the external drag, the available pressure, the critical Mach numbers, and the effect on the maximum lift. The results showed that the most satisfactory entrances, which had practically no effect on the wing characteristics, had their lips approximately in the vertical plane of the leading edge of the wing. This requirement necessitated extending the lips outside the wing contour for all except the small entrances. Full dynamic pressure was found to be available over a fairly wide range of angle of attack. The critical Mach number for a small entrance was calculated to be as high as that for the plain wing but was slightly lower for the larger entrances tested.
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Intercooler Design for Aircraft, Special Report

Intercooler Design for Aircraft, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1939
Creator: Brevoort, M. J.
Description: When an airplane is operating at high altitude, it is necessary to use a supercharger to maintain ground pressure at the carburetor inlet. This maintenance and high intake-manifold pressure tends to keep the power output of the engine at ground-level value. The air, being compressed by the supercharger, however, is heated by adiabatic compression and friction to a temperature that seriously affect the performance of the engine. It is thus necessary to use an intercooler to reduce the temperature of the air between the supercharger outlet and the carburetor inlet. The amount of cooling required of the intercooler depend on the efficiency of the supercharger installation. In this investigation, several types of intercoolers were compared and a design procedure that will give the best intercooler for a given set of conditions is indicated. The figure of merit used for the selection of the best design was the total power consumed by the intercooler. This value includes the power required to transport the weight of the intercooler as well as the power used to force the charge air and the cooling air through the intercooler. The cost, size and practicality of construction were not considered, inasmuch as it was thought that ...
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Radiator Design and Installation

Radiator Design and Installation

Date: May 1, 1939
Creator: Brevoort, M.J.
Description: The fundamental principles of fluid flow, pressure losses, and heat transfer have been presented and analyzed for the case of a smooth tube with fully developed turbulent flow. These equations apply to tubes with large length-diameter ratios where the f1ow is at a high Reynolds Number. The error introduced by using these equations increases as the magnitude of the tube length and the air-flow Reynolds Number approaches the values encountered in modern radiator designs. Accordingly, heat-transfer tests on radiator sections were made and the results are presented in nondimensional form to facilitate their use and for comparison with other heat-transfer data. In addition, pressure losses were measured along smooth tubes of circular, square, and rectangular cross section and the results were also correlated and are presented in nondimensional form. The problem of a radiator design for a particular installation is solved, the experimental heat-transfer and pressure-loss data being used, on a basis of power chargeable to the radiator for form drag, for propelling the weight, and for forcing the air through the radiator. The case of an installation within a wing or an engine nacelle is considered. An illustration of radiator design is carried through for an arbitrary set of ...
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Energy Loss, Velocity Distribution, and Temperature Distribution for a Baffled Cylinder Model, Special Report

Energy Loss, Velocity Distribution, and Temperature Distribution for a Baffled Cylinder Model, Special Report

Date: April 1, 1937
Creator: Brevoort, Maurice J.
Description: In the design of a cowling a certain pressure drop across the cylinders of a radial air-cooled engine is made available. Baffles are designed to make use of this available pressure drop for cooling. The problem of cooling an air-cooled engine cylinder has been treated, for the most part, from considerations of a large heat-transfer coefficient. The knowledge of the precise cylinder characteristics that give a maximum heat-transfer coefficient should be the first consideration. The next problem is to distribute this ability to cool so that the cylinder cools uniformly. This report takes up the problem of the design of a baffle for a model cylinder. A study has been made of the important principles involved in the operation of a baffle for an engine cylinder and shows that the cooling can be improved 20% by using a correctly designed baffle. Such a gain is as effective in cooling the cylinder with the improved baffle as a 65% increase in pressure drop across the standard baffle and fin tips.
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Mechanical Properties of Flush-Riveted Joints

Mechanical Properties of Flush-Riveted Joints

Date: January 1, 1940
Creator: Bruggeman, Wm. C. & Roop, Frederick C.
Description: The strength of representative types of flush-riveted joints has been determined by testing 865 single-shearing, double-shearing, and tensile specimens representing 7 types of rivet and 18 types of joint. The results, presented in graphic form, show the stress at failure, type of failure, and d/t ratio. In general, 'dimpled' joints were appreciably stronger than countersunk or protruding-head joints, but their strength was greatly influenced by constructional details. The optimum d/t ratios have been determined for the several kinds of joints. Photomacrographs of each type show constructional details and, in several instances, cracks in the sheet.
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