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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1950-1959
 Year: 1957
 Month: January
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Aerodynamic characteristics at high speeds of related full-scale propellers having different blade-section cambers

Aerodynamic characteristics at high speeds of related full-scale propellers having different blade-section cambers

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Maynard, Julian D
Description: Wind-tunnel tests of a full-scale two-blade NACA 10-(10)(08)-03 (high camber) propeller have been made for a range of blade angles from 20 degrees to 55 degrees at airspeeds up to 500 miles per hour. The results of these tests have been compared with results from previous tests of the NACA 10-(3) (08)-03 (low camber) and NACA 10-(5)(08)-03 (medium camber) propellers to evaluate the effects of blade-section camber on propeller aerodynamic characteristics.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 0.04956-Scale Model of the Convair TF-102A Airplane at Transonic Speeds, Coord. No. AF-120

Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 0.04956-Scale Model of the Convair TF-102A Airplane at Transonic Speeds, Coord. No. AF-120

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Osborne, Robert S.
Description: The basic aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair TF-102A airplane with controls undeflected have been determined at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.135 for angles of attack up to approximately 22 deg in the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel. In addition, comparisons have been made with data obtained from a previous investigation of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102A airplane. The results indicated the TF-102A airplane was longitudinally stable for all conditions tested. An increase in lift-curve slope from 0.045 to 0.059 and an 11-percent rearward shift in aerodynamic-center location occurred with increases in Mach number from 0.60 to approximately 1.05. The zero-lift drag coefficient for the TF-102A airplane increased 145 percent between the Mach numbers of 0.85 and 1.075; the maximum lift-drag ratio decreased from 9.5 at a Mach number of 0.60 to 5.0 at Mach numbers above 1.025. There was little difference in the lift and pitching-moment characteristics and drag due to life between the TF-102A and F-102A configurations. However, as compared with the F-102A airplane, the zero-lift drag-rise Mach number for the TF-102A was reduced by at least 0.06, the zero-lift peak wave drag was increased 50 percent, and the maximum lift-drag ratio was ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic characteristics of a circular cylinder at Mach number 6.86 and angles of attack up to 90 degrees

Aerodynamic characteristics of a circular cylinder at Mach number 6.86 and angles of attack up to 90 degrees

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Penland, Jim A
Description: Pressure-distribution and force tests of a circular cylinder have been made in the Langley 11-inch hypersonic tunnel at a Mach number of 6.88, a Reynolds number of 129,000, and angles of attack up to 90 degrees. The results are compared with the hypersonic approximation of Grimminger, Williams, and Young and a simple modification of the Newtonian flow theory. An evaluation of the crossflow theory is made through comparison of present results with available crossflow Mach number drag coefficients.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic Forces and Moments on a Large Ogive-Cylinder Store at Various Locations Below the Fuselage Center Line of a Swept-Wing Bomber Configuration at a Mach Number of 1.61

Aerodynamic Forces and Moments on a Large Ogive-Cylinder Store at Various Locations Below the Fuselage Center Line of a Swept-Wing Bomber Configuration at a Mach Number of 1.61

Date: January 14, 1957
Creator: Morris, O. A.
Description: A supersonic wind-tunnel investigation on store interference has been conducted in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at a Mach number of 1.61. Forces and moments were measured on a large ogive-cylinder store in the presence of a 45 deg swept-wing-fuselage bomber configuration for a number of store locations below the fuselage center line. Results of the investigation show that large variations of store lift, drag, and pitch occur with changes in store or airplane angle of attack, store vertical location, and store horizontal location. The variation of the store forces and moments with respect to the chordwise location of the wing plan form indicates that the wing is a large factor in producing the interference loads on the store. Comparison of data for underfuselage and underwing store locations at an angle of attack of 0 deg showed maximum store drag interferences of similar magnitudes, but showed considerably smaller maximum interference on store lift an pitching moments for underfuselage store locations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic interference of slender wing-tail combinations

Aerodynamic interference of slender wing-tail combinations

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Sacks, Alvin H
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Altitude free-jet investigation of dynamics of a 28-inch-diameter ram-jet engine

Altitude free-jet investigation of dynamics of a 28-inch-diameter ram-jet engine

Date: January 15, 1957
Creator: Crowl, R. J.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Analysis of efficiency characteristics of a single-stage turbine with downstream stators in terms of work and speed requirements

Analysis of efficiency characteristics of a single-stage turbine with downstream stators in terms of work and speed requirements

Date: January 23, 1957
Creator: Wintucky, William T
Description: One-dimensional mean-section flow and blade specific losses proportional to average specific kinetic energy are assumed in the analysis. Range of the work-speed parameter lambda considered includes low to moderate blade speeds with high specific work outputs, where critical turbojet, turbopump, and accessory-drive turbines are encountered. A diffusion factor of 0.5 limits the loading on the downstream stators. Turbine efficiences considered are total or aerodynamic, rating, and static. Efficiences of velocity-diagram types at impulse and that corresponding to values of maximum efficiency are presented and compared to indicate in what range of lambda downstream stators are beneficial as well as the attending improvements in efficiency.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Analysis of fluorine addition to the vanguard first stage

Analysis of fluorine addition to the vanguard first stage

Date: January 24, 1957
Creator: Schmidt, H. W.
Description: Addition of liquid fluorine to liquid oxygen in Vanguard first stage oxygen-hydrocarbon rocket engine.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Analysis of fluorine addition to the vanguard first stage

Analysis of fluorine addition to the vanguard first stage

Date: January 24, 1957
Creator: Tomazic, William A
Description: The effect of adding fluorine to the Vanguard first-stage oxidant was anlyzed. An increase in specific impulse of 5.74 percent may be obtained with 30 percent fluorine. This increase, coupled with increased mass ratio due to greater oxidant density, gave up to 24.6-percent increase in first-stage burnout energy with 30 percent fluorine added. However, a change in tank configuration is required to accommodate the higher oxidant-fuel ratio necessary for peak specific impulse with fluorine addition.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An analysis of the effects of aeroelasticity on static longitudinal stability and control of a swept-wing airplane

An analysis of the effects of aeroelasticity on static longitudinal stability and control of a swept-wing airplane

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Skoog, Richard B
Description: A theoretical analysis has been made of the effects of aeroelasticity on the static longitudinal stability and elevator angle required for balance of an airplane. The analysis is based on the familiar stability equation expressing the contribution of wing and tail to longitudinal stability. Effects of wing, tail, and fuselage flexibility are considered. Calculated effects are shown for a swept-wing bomber of relatively high flexibility.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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