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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1920-1929
 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
The altitude effect on air speed indicators II
In an investigation described in NACA Technical Report 110, it was shown that under certain conditions, particularly for the relatively low-speed flight of airships, the data obtained were not sufficiently accurate. This report describes an investigation in which the data obtained were sufficiently accurate and complete to enable the viscosity correction to be deduced quantitatively for a number of the air-speed pressure nozzles in common use. The report opens with a discussion of the theory of the performance of air-speed nozzles and of the calibration of the indicators, from which the theory of the altitude correction is developed. Then follows the determination of the performance characteristics of the nozzles and calibration constants used for the indicators. In the latter half of the report, the viscosity correction is computed for the Zahm Pitot-venturi nozzles. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65807/
The altitude laboratory for the test of aircraft engines
Report presents descriptions, schematics, and photographs of the altitude laboratory for the testing of aircraft engines constructed at the Bureau of Standards for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65663/
Altitude of equilibrium of an airship
This report details the procedure followed in establishing a general formula enabling the calculation of the maximum altitude attainable statically. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59068/
Aluminum and its light alloys
Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65654/
"AM" flexible metal joint
A flexible metal joint used for connecting fuel lines is investigated and methods for assembly are included. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277480/
"AM" gasoline cock.
The "AM" cock was designed specially for gasoline pipes on vehicles using internal combustion engines (airplanes, airships, automobiles, tractors, battle "tanks", boats, etc.). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277515/
The American airship ZR-3
This airship was built by the Zeppelin Airship Company at Friedrichshafen in 1923-4, for the United States Navy, as the reparations service of the German Government in fulfillment of the treaty of peace. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58756/
The Amiot S.E.C.M. 110 C.1 : a single-seat pursuit monoplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279450/
The Analysis of Aircraft Structures as Space Frameworks. Method Based on the Forces in the Longitudinal Members
The following examples do not take up the discussion of viewpoints to be heeded in determining the design of a framework for given external conditions. Rather they are methods for determining the forces in airplane fuselages and wings, though similar considerations are applied to certain simple cases of a different kind. The object of this treatise is to summarize and amplify these considerations from definite viewpoints. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65376/
Analysis of Dr. Schaffran's propeller model tests
This analysis was made in the same way as Dr. Durand's tests. Only the thrust is examined. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53831/
Analysis of flight and wind-tunnel tests on Udet airplanes with reference to spinning characteristics
This report presents an analysis of results of wind-tunnel tests conducted at the D.V.L. Values were determined for the effectiveness of all the controls at various angles of attack. The autorotation was studied by subjecting the rotating model to an air blast. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277540/
The analysis of free flight propeller tests and its application to design
This report contains a description of a new and useful method suitable for the design of propellers and for the interpretation of tests with propellers. The fictitious slipstream velocity, computed from the absorbed horsepower, is plotted against the relative slip velocity. It is discussed in detail how this velocity is obtained, interpreted, and used. The methods are then illustrated by applying them to model tests and to free flight tests with actual propellers. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65833/
Analysis of stresses in German airplanes
This report contains an account of the origin of the views and fundamental principles underlying the construction of German airplanes during the war. The report contains a detailed discussion of the aerodynamic principles and their use in determining the strength of airplanes, the analysis of the strength qualities of materials and in the construction, the calculated strength of air flows and a description of tests made in determining the strength of airplanes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65794/
Analysis of W. F. Durand's and E. P. Lesley's propeller tests
This report is a critical study of the results of propeller model tests with the view of obtaining a clear insight into the mechanism of the propeller action and of examining the soundness of the physical explanation generally given. The nominal slip-stream velocity is plotted against the propeller tip velocity, both measured by the velocity of flight as a unit. Within the range corresponding to conditions of flight, the curve thus obtained is a straight line. Its inclination depends chiefly on the effective blade width, its position on the effective pitch. These two quantities can therefore be determined from the result of each propeller test. Both can easily be estimated therefrom for new propellers of similar type. Thus, a simple method for the computation of propellers suggests itself. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66039/
Analysis of wing truss stresses including the effect of redundancies
Airplane wing trusses are generally designed to contain redundant members (stagger wires and external drag wires) which, according to common practice, are not taken into account in calculations, so as to simplify the stress analysis by rendering the structure statically determinate. A more accurate method, in which the redundancies are included, involves a solution by means of Castigliano's method of least work. For the purpose of demonstrating the practical application of the method of least work this report presents examples for stresses of several cases of loading worked out for a structure similar to that of the Curtiss JN-4h. Case 1 was taken as the condition of velocity of 100 miles per hour combined with the angle of attack of maximum lift. Case 1a assumed the same loading but neglected the distortion of wooden members in the least-work analysis. So little error was involved in case 1a that this simplified method was employed for each succeeding case. Case 2 assumed a diving speed of 120 miles per hour and an angle of attack of no lift. Case 3 was worked out for the conditions imposed by the sand load recommended in NACA technical note no. 6. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65742/
Analytical methods for computing the polar curves of airplanes
This report presents a method of calculating polar curves which is at least as precise as graphical methods, but it more rapid. Knowing the wind tunnel test of a wing and the performances of an airplane of the same profile, it is easy to verify the characteristic coefficients and, at the same time, the methods determining induced resistances. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277557/
Aneroid investigations in Germany
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53766/
Angles of attack and air speeds during maneuvers
In seeking further information as to the nature of maneuvers and as to the maneuverability characteristics of airplanes, continuous measurements of the angles of attack and air speeds at several points along the wings have been made during spins and loops. Very striking results have been obtained with reference to the rolling velocity and the distribution of load in spins and the variation of the angle of attack in loops, a surprisingly large range of angle being experienced during slow loops. The flight tests and results are fully described in this report. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65755/
Annual report for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (10th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 186 to 209
Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65837/
Annual report for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (11th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 210 to 232
Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65861/
Annual report for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (12th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 233 to 256
Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65885/
Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (13th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 257 to 282
Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65909/
Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (14th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 283 to 308
Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65936/
Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (4th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 24 to 50
Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, problems, recommendations, and a compilation of technical reports produced. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65643/
Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (5th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 51 to 82
Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, and a compilation of technical reports produced. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65704/
Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (6th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 83 to 110
Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, House of Representatives bill 14061, a copy of the bill introduced to the House of Representatives to regulate air navigation, and a compilation of technical reports produced. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65732/
Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (7th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 111 to 132
Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, and expenditures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65761/
Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (8th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 133 to 158
Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, and expenditures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65784/
Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (9th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 159 to 185
Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, and expenditures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65810/
The application of propeller test data to design and performance calculations
This report is a study of a test data on a family of Durand's propellers (nos. 3, 7, 11, 82, 113, 139), which is fairly representative of conventional design. The test data are so plotted that the proper pitch and diameters for any given set of conditions are readily obtained. The same data are plotted in other forms which may be used for calculating performance when the ratio of pitch to diameter is known. These new plots supply a means for calculating the performance, at any altitude, of airplanes equipped with normal or supercharged engines. The coefficients used and the methods of plotting adopted in this report coordinate the results of a few tests into complete families of curves covering the entire range of p/d ordinarily used. This method of analyzing test data enables an investigator to plan tests systematically and leads to useful application of test data. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65836/
Application of the "Magnus effect" to the wind propulsion of ships
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65110/
Applications of Modern Hydrodynamics to Aeronautics
The report gives, rather briefly, in part one an introduction to hydrodynamics which is designed to give those who have not yet been actively concerned with this science such a grasp of the theoretical underlying principles that they can follow the subsequent developments. In part two there follows a separate discussion of the different questions to be considered, in which the theory of aerofoils claims the greatest portion of the space. The last part is devoted to the application of the aerofoil theory to screw propellers. A table giving the most important quantities is at the end of the report. A short reference list of the literature on the subject and also a table of contents are added. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65767/
Applying the results of experiments on small models in the wind tunnel to the calculation of full-sized aircraft
This report presents the attempt to develop a law which will permit the use of results obtained on small models in a tunnel for the calculation of full-sized airplanes, or if it exists, a law of similitude relating air forces on a full-sized plane to those on a reduced scale model. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54277/
Approximate Calculation of the Static Longitudinal Stability of Airplanes
It seems desirable to have some simple method for calculating quickly and with sufficient accuracy: 1) the correct position of the center of gravity; 2) the requisite tail-group dimensions; 3) and the course of the wing and tail-group moments. In out deductions, we will first replace the biplane (disregarding the effect of stagger, decalage and induced drag) by an equivalent monoplane, whose dimensions and position in space can be approximately determined in a simple manner. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65120/
Approximation method for determining the static stability of a monoplane glider
The calculations in this paper afford an approximate solution of the static stability. A derivation of the formulas for moment coefficient of a wing, moment coefficient of elevator, and the total moment of the combined wing and elevator and the moment coefficient with reference to the center of gravity are provided. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277434/
Approximations for column effect in airplane wing spars
The significance attaching to "column effect" in airplane wing spars has been increasingly realized with the passage of time, but exact computations of the corrections to bending moment curves resulting from the existence of end loads are frequently omitted because of the additional labor involved in an analysis by rigorously correct methods. The present report represents an attempt to provide for approximate column effect corrections that can be graphically or otherwise expressed so as to be applied with a minimum of labor. Curves are plotted giving approximate values of the correction factors for single and two bay trusses of varying proportions and with various relationships between axial and lateral loads. It is further shown from an analysis of those curves that rough but useful approximations can be obtained from Perry's formula for corrected bending moment, with the assumed distance between points of inflection arbitrarily modified in accordance with rules given in the report. The discussion of general rules of variation of bending stress with axial load is accompanied by a study of the best distribution of the points of support along a spar for various conditions of loading. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65903/
The arithmetic of distribution in multi-cylinder engines
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53842/
The Armstrong-Whitworth "Argosy" : the latest three-engined commercial airplane
Describes the utility of multi-engine aircraft with special regard to the Argosy, which will seat up to 20 passengers and who's engines turn out nearly 1200 HP. The Argosy had a top speed of 110 MPH, and a range of 400 miles. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279527/
The Armstrong Whitworth "Starling" (British) : (single seat fighter)
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279631/
The art of writing scientific reports
As the purpose of the report is to transmit as smoothly and as easily as possible, certain facts and ideas, to the average person likely to read it, it should be written in a full and simple enough manner to be comprehended by the least tutored, and still not be boring to the more learned readers. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53610/
Astronomical methods in aerial navigation
The astronomical method of determining position is universally used in marine navigation and may also be of service in aerial navigation. The practical application of the method, however, must be modified and adapted to conform to the requirements of aviation. Much of this work of adaptation has already been accomplished, but being scattered through various technical journals in a number of languages, is not readily available. This report is for the purpose of collecting under one cover such previous work as appears to be of value to the aerial navigator, comparing instruments and methods, indicating the best practice, and suggesting future developments. The various methods of determining position and their application and value are outlined, and a brief resume of the theory of the astronomical method is given. Observation instruments are described in detail. A complete discussion of the reduction of observations follows, including a rapid method of finding position from the altitudes of two stars. Maps and map cases are briefly considered. A bibliography of the subject is appended. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65849/
Atmospheric waves and their utilization in soaring flight
In soaring flight, ascending air currents are utilized and the interesting question is raised whether there are such currents which extend to any considerable distance and which can be utilized practically. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277367/
Atomization of liquid fuels. Part I
In the present treatise we will consider chiefly the problem of solid injection in comparison with air injection. On leaving the valve or nozzle through one or more small openings, the fuel is split up into innumerable fine drops, which penetrate the combustion chamber in divergent directions in the form of a conical jet. The efficiency of this jet is judged from the following three viewpoints: 1) with respect to the fineness of atomization; 2) with respect to the direction or distribution of sprayed particles; 3) with respect to the penetration of the particles. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65135/
Atomization of liquid fuels. Part II
This report describes the design and operation of a nozzle to inject fuel into an engine. The design of the nozzle is open, without any compulsory or automatic stop-valve. The fuel injection is regulated simply by the pressure and the adjustment of the fuel pump. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65068/
Atomization of liquid fuels. Part III
This report provides a critical discussion of the results of the experiments conducted in the previous NACA-TM's 329 and 330. The main object of this investigation was to determine the size of the drops in mechanical atomization. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277388/
Autogenous welding in airplane construction
Autogenous welding is discussed and various methods of testing those welds are presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277565/
The "Autogiro"
For the first time in the world, a flying machine, heavier than the air and distinct from the airplane, has completed a circuit of four kilometers (nearly 2.5 miles) at a height of more than 25 meters (82 feet) above the ground. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56119/
An automatic speed control for wind tunnels
Described here is an automatic control that has been used in several forms in wind tunnels at the Washington Navy Yard. The form now in use with the 8-foot tunnel at the Navy Yard is considered here. Details of the design and operation of the automatic control system are given. Leads from a Pitot tube are joined to an inverted cup manometer located above a rheostat. When the sliding weight of this instrument is set to a given notch, say for 40 m.p.h, the beam tip vibrates between two electric contacts that feed the little motor. Thus, when the wind is too strong or too weak, the motor automatically throws the rheostat slide forward and backward. If it failed to function well, the operator would notice the effect on his meniscus, and would operate the hand control by merely pressing the switch. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53958/
Avia pursuit airplane B.H. 21
Built by the 'Czecho-Slovakian' aircraft factory, AVIA, the B.H. 21, has a top speed of 250 MPH, and carries 120 kg of gasoline and 20 kg of oil, giving it a radius of action of 600-650 km. It is equipped with a Hispano-Suiza engine capable of 300 HP. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279614/
Aviation and insurance
This article considers some of the causes which hinder the development of aircraft insurance. Different risks are discussed as well as the causes of aircraft accidents. Pilot error, poor airdromes, weather conditions, poorly adapted airplanes, and engine failures are all examined and some conclusions are made. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55230/