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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
The 1934 contest for the Deutsch de la Meurthe trophy
This report presents a description of the rules, history and new technical innovations in the Deutsch de la Meurthe Cup race of 1934. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63460/
The A.B.C. "Robin" (British) : a single-seat cabin monoplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64615/
The A. B. Flygindustri "K 37" (Swedish Junkers) : A Low-Wing All-Metal Military Airplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64629/
N.A.C.A. control position recorder
A new instrument is described which is capable of simultaneously recording the position of the three controls of an airplane. The records are taken photographically on a standard N.A.C.A. film drum and the instrument can be quickly installed in any airplane. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53770/
N.A.C.A. Langley field wind tunnel apparatusthe tilting manometer
A description is given of a tilting manometer designed to meet the requirements of a manometer for use in the wind tunnel at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. This gauge was designed to meet the requirements of a manometer in use in connection with a static pressure plate to indicate the wind speed in the tunnel. The requirements are noted. The sensitivity of the gauge must be made inversely proportional to the pressure to be measured. The gauge must be accurately and quickly set for any desired pressure. When set at the desired pressure, the extent of variation between the existing and the desired pressures may be readily estimated. In fact, this manometer is quick to adjust, is easy to read, always has the meniscus in the same position, and accurately indicates a large range of air speeds on what is a comparatively compact instrument. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53735/
N.A.C.A. recording air speed meter
A new type of air speed meter is described which was designed by the technical staff of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The instrument consists essentially of a tight metal diaphragm of high natural period which is acted upon by the pressure difference of a pitot-static head. The resulting deflection of this diaphragm is recorded optically on a moving film. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53744/
N.A.C.A. Stall-Warning Device
With some airplanes the approach to the stall is accompanied by changes in the behavior, such as tail buffeting or changes in the control characteristics of the airplane so that the pilot obtains a warning of the impending stall. Vith other airplanes it is possible to approach the stall without any perceptible warning other than the reading of the air-speed meter, in which case the danger of inadvertent stalling is considerably greater. Although it is not within the scope of this paper to discuss stalling characteristics, it is desired to point out that in general the danger of inadvertent stalling is greatest with those airplanes that behave worse when the stalling occurs; that is, with airplanes in which the stall starts at the wing tips. A warning of the impending stall is desirable in any case, but is particularly desirable with airplanes of the latter type. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65017/
The A.N.E.C. IV "Missel Thrush" light airplane
A product of the Air Navigation Engineering Co., the Missel Thrush is a light airplane suitable for private ownership. It is a two seat tractor fuselage biplane with single I interplane struts designed by J. Bewsher. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279637/
The Aachen wind-tunnel balance
A description of the balance in the Aachen wind-tunnel. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63470/
Abacus for the reduction of English measures to the metric system and vice versa
This report presents a description of the abacus as well as construction details. There is also a detailed description on how to use the abacus. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53628/
Abacus giving the variation of the mean pressure of an aviation engine as a function of its speed of rotation
Comparing the results of the calculations for computing the mean pressure of an aviation engine for any number of revolutions, with those of experiment, the writer, by numerous examples, shows the perfect agreement between them. This report will show that, by means of a special abacus, an engineer can instantly plot the characteristics of an engine. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53605/
Ability of pilots to control simulated short-period yawing oscillations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58499/
Abnormal grain growth in M-252 and S-816 alloys
An experimental investigation was carried out on air- and vacuum-melted M-252 and S-816 alloys to find conditions of heating and hot-working which resulted in abnormal grain growth. The experiments were mainly limited to normal conditions of heating for hot-working and heat treatment and normal temperatures of solution treatment were used to allow grain growth after susceptibility to abnormal grain growth was developed by various experimental conditions. Results indicated that small reductions of essentially strain-free metal were the basic cause of such grain growth. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57131/
Abnormal grain growth in nickel-base heat-resistant alloys
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57096/
Abnormal grain growth in S-816 alloy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57000/
Absolute coefficients and the graphical representation of airfoil characteristics
It is argued that there should be an agreement as to what conventions to use in determining absolute coefficients used in aeronautics and in how to plot those coefficients. Of particular importance are the absolute coefficients of lift and drag. The author argues for the use of the German method over the kind in common use in the United States and England, and for the Continental over the usual American and British method of graphically representing the characteristics of an airfoil. The author notes that, on the whole, it appears that the use of natural absolute coefficients in a polar diagram is the logical method for presentation of airfoil characteristics, and that serious consideration should be given to the advisability of adopting this method in all countries, in order to advance uniformity and accuracy in the science of aeronautics. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53725/
Absolute dimensions of Karman vortex motion
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53809/
Absorbing landing shocks
Tires, steel springs, hydraulic shock absorbers, and axle travel are all examined in relation to absorbing landing shocks. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56246/
Abstracts pertaining to seaplanes
About 400 references pertaining to the hydrodynamic design of seaplanes have been compiled, and the information is presented in the form of abstracts classified under six main headings. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62825/
Acceleration characteristics of a turbojet engine with variable-position inlet guide vanes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60813/
Acceleration Characteristics of R-3350 Engine Equipped with NACA Injection Impeller
Qualitative investigations have shown that use of the NACA injection impeller with the R-3350 engine increases the inertia of the fuel-injection system and, when the standard fuel-metering system is used, this increase in inertia results in poor engine acceleration characteristics. This investigation was therefore undertaken to determine whether satisfactory acceleration characteristics of the engine equipped with the injection impeller could be obtained by simple modifications to the fuel-monitoring system. The engine was operated with two types of carburetor; namely, a hydraulic-metering carburetor incorporating a vacuum-operated accelerating pump and a direct-metering carburetor having a throttle-actuated accelerating pump. The vacuum-operated accelerating pump of the hydraulic-metering carburetor was modified to produce satisfactory accelerations by supplementing the standard air chamber with an additional 75-cubic spring. The throttle-actuated accelerating pump of the direct-metering carburetor was modified to produce satisfactory accelerations by replacing the standard 0.028-inch-diameter bleed in the load-compensator balance line with a smaller bleed of 0.0225-inch diameter. The results of this investigation indicated that both carburetors can be easily modified to produce satisfactory acceleration characteristics of the engine and no definite choice between the types of carburetor and accelerating pump can be made. Use of the direct-metering carburetor, however, probably resulted in better fuel distribution to the cylinders during the acceleration period and reduced the backfire hazard because all the fuel is introduced through the injection impeller. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63808/
Acceleration Measurements During Landing in Rough Water of a 1/7-Scale Dynamic Model of Grumman XJR2F-1 Amphibian - Langley Tank Model 212, TED No. NACA 2378
Tests of a 1/7 size model of the Grumman XJR2F-1 amphibian were made in Langley tank no.1 to examine the landing behavior in rough water and to measure the normal and angular accelerations experienced by the model during these landings. All landings were made normal to the direction of wave advance, a condition assumed to produce the greatest accelerations. Wave heights of 4.4 and 8.0 inches (2.5 and 4.7 ft, full size) were used in the tests and the wave lengths were varied between 10 and 50 feet (70 and 350 ft, full size). Maximum normal accelerations of about 6.5g were obtained in 4.4 inch waves and 8.5g were obtained in 8.0 inch waves. A maximum angular acceleration corresponding to 16 radians per second per second, full size, was obtained in the higher waves. The data indicate that the airplane will experience its greatest accelerations when landing in waves of about 20 feet (140 ft, full size) in length. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64281/
Acceleration Measurements During Landings of a 1/5.5-Size Dynamic Model of the Columbia XJL-1 Amphibian in Smooth Water and in Waves: Langley Tank Model 208M, TED No. NACA 2336
A 1/5.5-size powered dynamic model of the Columbia XJL-1 amphibian was landed in Langley tank no. 1 in smooth water and in oncoming waves of heights from 2.1 feet to 6.4 feet (full-size) and lengths from 50 feet to 264 feet (full-size). The motions and the vertical accelerations of the model were continuously recorded. The greatest vertical acceleration measured during the smooth-water landings was 3.1g. During landings in rough water the greatest vertical acceleration measured was 15.4g, for a landing in 6.4-foot by 165-foot waves. The impact accelerations increased with increase in wave height and, in general, decreased with increase in wave length. During the landings in waves the model bounced into the air at stalled attitudes at speeds below flying speed. The model trimmed up to the mechanical trim stop (20 deg) during landings in waves of heights greater than 2.0 feet. Solid water came over the bow and damaged the propeller during one landing in 6.4-foot waves. The vertical acceleration coefficients at first impact from the tank tests of a 1/5.5-size model were in fair agreement with data obtained at the Langley impact basin during tests of a 1/2-size model of the hull. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64233/
Acceleration of high-pressure-ratio single-spool turbojet engine as determined from component performance characteristics : effect of compressor interstage air bleed
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59611/
Acceleration of high-pressure-ratio single-spool turbojet engine as determined from component performance characteristics I : effect of air bleed at compressor outlet
An analytical investigation was made to determine from component performance characteristics the effect of air bleed at the compressor outlet on the acceleration characteristics of a typical high-pressure-ratio single-spool turbojet engine. Consideration of several operating lines on the compressor performance map with two turbine-inlet temperatures showed that for a minimum acceleration time the turbine-inlet temperature should be the maximum allowable, and the operating line on the compressor map should be as close to the surge region as possible throughout the speed range. Operation along such a line would require a continuously varying bleed area. A relatively simple two-step area bleed gives only a small increase in acceleration time over a corresponding variable-area bleed. For the modes of operation considered, over 84 percent of the total acceleration time was required to accelerate through the low-speed range ; therefore, better low-speed compressor performance (higher pressure ratios and efficiencies) would give a significant reduction in acceleration time. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59518/
Acceleration of high-pressure-ratio single-spool turbojet engine as determined from component performance characteristics III : effect of turbine stator adjustment
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60396/
An acceleration schedule control for accelerating a turbojet engine and its use with a speed control
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63981/
An acceleration schedule control for accelerating a turbojet engine and its use with a speed control
Accelerating-limiting controls for turbojet engines. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc52973/
Acceleration, stress, and deflection measurements on the XB-15 bomber in gusty air
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61098/
Accelerations and bottom pressures measured on a B-24D airplane in a ditching test
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61135/
Accelerations and passenger harness loads measured in full-scale light-airplane crashes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56800/
Accelerations in fighter-airplane crashes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63594/
Accelerations in flight
This report deals with the accelerations obtained in flight on various airplanes at Langley Field for the purpose of obtaining the magnitude of the load factors in flight and to procure information on the behavior of an airplane in various maneuvers. The instrument used in these tests was a recording accelerometer of a new type designed by the technical staff of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The instrument consists of a flat steel spring supported rigidly at one end so that the free end may be deflected by its own weight from its neutral position by any acceleration acting at right angles to the plane of the spring. This deflection is measured by a very light tilting mirror caused to rotate by the deflection of the spring, which reflected the beam of light onto a moving film. The motion of the spring is damped by a thin aluminum vane which rotates with the spring between the poles of an electric magnet. Records were taken on landings and takeoffs, in loops, spins, spirals, and rolls. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65749/
Accelerations in flight
This work on accelerometry was done at McCook Field for the purpose of continuing the work done by other investigators and obtaining the accelerations which occur when a high-speed pursuit airplane is subjected to the more common maneuvers. The accelerations obtained in suddenly pulling out of a dive with well-balanced elevators are shown to be within 3 or 4 per cent of the theoretically possible accelerations. The maximum acceleration which a pilot can withstand depends upon the length of time the acceleration is continued. It is shown that he experiences no difficulty under the instantaneous accelerations as high as 7.8 G., but when under accelerations in excess of 4.5 G., continued for several seconds, he quickly loses his faculties. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65854/
Accelerations in Landing with a Tricycle-Type Landing Gear
In connection with the application of stable tricycle-type landing gears to transport airplanes, the question arises as to whether certain passengers may not experience relatively great accelerations in an emergency landing. Since the main landing wheels are behind the center of gravity in this type of gear, a hard-braked landing will cause immediate nosing down of the airplane and, when this motion is stopped due to the front wheel striking the ground, there will be some tendency for the rearmost passengers to be thrown out of their seats, The provided rough calculations are designed to show the magnitudes of the various reactions experienced in a severe landing under these circumstances. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65079/
Accelerations in transport-airplane crashes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56808/
Accelerations measured at center of gravity and along span of the wing of a B-24D airplane in landing impacts
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61134/
Accelerometer design
In connection with the development of an accelerometer for measuring the loads on airplanes in free flight a study of the theory of such instruments has been made, and the results of this study are summarized in this report. A portion of the analysis deals particularly with the sources of error and with the limitations placed on the location of the instrument in the airplane. The discussion of the dynamics of the accelerometer includes a study of its theoretical motions and of the way in which they are affected by the natural period of vibration and by the damping, together with a report of some experiments on the effect of forced vibrations on the record. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65750/
Accuracy of airspeed measurements and flight calibration procedures
The sources of error that may enter into the measurement of airspeed by pitot-static methods are reviewed in detail together with methods of flight calibration of airspeed installations. Special attention is given to the problem of accurate measurements of airspeed under conditions of high speed and maneuverability required of military airplanes. (author). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65478/
Accuracy of approximate methods for predicting pressures on pointed nonlifting bodies of revolution in supersonic flow
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56461/
The accuracy of the substitute-stringer approach for determining the bending frequencies of multistringer box beams
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57907/
An accurate and rapid method for the design of supersonic nozzles
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57389/
Accurate calculation of multispar cantilever and semicantilever wings with parallel webs under direct and indirect loading
In the present report the computation is actually carried through for the case of parallel spars of equal resistance in bending without direct loading, including plotting of the influence lines; for other cases the method of calculation is explained. The development of large size airplanes can be speeded up by accurate methods of calculation such as this. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277384/
An accurate method of measuring the moments of inertia of airplanes
This note contains a description of an improved apparatus and procedure used by the NACA for determining the moments of inertia of airplanes. The method used, based on the pendulum theory, is similar to that previously used, but a recent investigation of its accuracy has resulted in the improvements described herein. The error, when using the new apparatus and procedure, has been found to be of the order of 1 per cent. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53995/
Achievement of continuous wall curvature in design of two-dimensional symmetrical supersonic nozzles
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56184/
Acoustic analysis of ram-jet buzz
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57885/
Acoustic radiation from two-dimensional rectangular cutouts in aerodynamic surfaces
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57843/
Acoustic, thrust, and drag characteristics of several full-scale noise suppressors for turbojet engines
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57452/
Acoustical treatment for the NACA 8- by 6-foot supersonic propulsion wind tunnel
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56258/
Acoustics of a nonhomogeneous moving medium.
Theoretical basis of the acoustics of a moving nonhomogeneous medium is considered in this report. Experiments that illustrate or confirm some of the theoretical explanation or derivation of these acoustics are also included. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65701/