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 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
A load factor formula

A load factor formula

Date: August 1, 1927
Creator: Miller, Roy G
Description: The ultimate test of a load factor formula is experience. The chief advantages of a semi rational formula over arbitrary factors are that it fairs in between points of experience and it differentiates according to variables within a type. Structural failure of an airplane apparently safe according to the formula would call for a specific change in the formula. The best class of airplanes with which to check a load factor formula seems to be those which have experienced structural failure. Table I comprises a list of the airplanes which have experienced failure in flight traceable to the wing structure. The load factor by formula is observed to be greater than the designed strength in each case, without a single exception. Table II comprises the load factor by formula with the designed strength of a number of well-known service types. The formula indicates that by far the majority of these have ample structural strength. One case considered here in deriving a suitable formula is that of a heavy load carrier of large size and practically no reserve power.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Wall interference in closed type wind tunnels

Wall interference in closed type wind tunnels

Date: March 1, 1927
Creator: Higgins, George J
Description: A series of tests has been conducted by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, in the variable density wind tunnel on several airfoils of different sizes and sections to determine the effect of tunnel wall interference and to determine a correction which can be applied to reduce the error caused thereby. The use of several empirical corrections was attempted with little success. The Prandtl theoretical correction gives the best results and its use is recommended for correcting closed wind tunnel results to conditions of free air.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Is there any available source of heat energy lighter than gasoline?

Is there any available source of heat energy lighter than gasoline?

Date: April 1, 1923
Creator: Meyer, P
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The installation and correction of compasses in airplanes

The installation and correction of compasses in airplanes

Date: August 1, 1927
Creator: Schoeffel, M F
Description: The saving of time that results from flying across country on compass headings is beginning to be widely recognized. At the same time the general use of steel tube fuselages has made a knowledge of compass correction much more necessary than was the case when wooden fuselages were the rule. This paper has been prepared primarily for the benefit of the pilot who has never studied navigation and who does not desire to go into the subject more deeply than to be able to fly compass courses with confidence. It also contains material for the designer who wishes to install his compasses with the expectation that they may be accurately corrected.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Welding of high chromium steels

Welding of high chromium steels

Date: June 1, 1928
Creator: Miller, W B
Description: A brief description is given of different groups of high chromium steels (rustless iron and stainless steels) according to their composition and more generally accepted names. The welding procedure for a given group will be much the same regardless of the slight variations in chemical composition which may exist within a certain group. Information is given for the tensile properties (yield point and ultimate strength) of metal sheets and welds before and after annealing on coupons one and one-half inches wide. Since welds in rustless iron containing 16 to 18 percent chromium and 7 to 12 percent nickel show the best combination of strength and ductility in the 'as welded' or annealed condition, it is considered the best alloy to use for welded construction.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The velocity distribution caused by an airplane at the points of a vertical plane containing the span

The velocity distribution caused by an airplane at the points of a vertical plane containing the span

Date: March 1, 1925
Creator: Munk, Max M
Description: A formula for the computation of the vertical velocity component on all sides of an airplane is deduced and discussed. The formation is of value for the interpretation of such free flight tests where two airplanes fly alongside each other to facilitate observation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tension experiments on diaphragm metals

Tension experiments on diaphragm metals

Date: August 1, 1927
Creator: Henrickson, H B
Description: Strips of german silver, steel, copper, duralumin, nickel and brass were tested in tension in an apparatus in which the change in deflection with time was measured by means of an interferometer. This change in deflection with time caused by the application and removal of a load is defined as "drift" and "recovery," respectively. It was measured in the time interval from approximately 5 seconds to 5 hours after loading. The data are given in a series of graphs in which the drift and recovery are plotted against time. The proportional drift and recovery in five hours are given for a number of the tests, and in addition are shown graphically for nickel and steel.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Large German airship stations

Large German airship stations

Date: August 1, 1921
Creator: Sabatier, J
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of artificial flight at high altitudes

Tests of artificial flight at high altitudes

Date: November 1, 1920
Creator: Gradenwitz, Arthur
Description: If we wish to form an accurate idea of the extraordinary progress achieved in aeronautics, a comparison must be made of the latest altitude records and the figures regarded as highest attainable limit some ten years ago. It is desirable, for two reasons, that we should be able to define the limit of the altitudes that can be reached without artificial aid. First, to know to what extent the human body can endure the inhalation of rarified air. Second, the mental capacity of the aviator must be tested at high altitudes and the limit known below which he is able to make reliable observations without being artificially supplied with oxygen. A pneumatic chamber was used for the most accurate observations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Shape and strength of seaplane under-structures with special regard to seaworthiness

Shape and strength of seaplane under-structures with special regard to seaworthiness

Date: August 1, 1921
Creator: Lewe, Victor
Description: This report presents experiments and calculations for the purpose of determining the landing gear requirements upon the water. Moving pictures are given which furnish data and also may give both the magnitude and direction of the forces acting. Different classes of seaplanes are examined and proposals for calculation instructions are given.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department