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 Decade: 1940-1949
 Year: 1947
 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
Investigations on reductions of friction on wings, in particular by means of boundary layer suction

Investigations on reductions of friction on wings, in particular by means of boundary layer suction

Date: August 1, 1947
Creator: Pfenninger, W.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A method for calculating the heat required for windshield thermal ice prevention based on extensive flight tests in natural icing conditions

A method for calculating the heat required for windshield thermal ice prevention based on extensive flight tests in natural icing conditions

Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: Jones, A. R.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Effects of Reynolds Number on the Application of NACA 16 Series Airfoil Characteristics to Propeller Design

The Effects of Reynolds Number on the Application of NACA 16 Series Airfoil Characteristics to Propeller Design

Date: June 11, 1947
Creator: Cleary, Harold E.
Description: An analysis has been made of airfoil data taken on several NACA 16-series propeller airfoils from tests of 5-inch-chord models in the Langley 24 inch high-speed tunnel and l2-inch-chord models in the Langley 8 foot high-speed tunnel, This analysis has shown that the combined effects of Reynolds number changes and variations in airfoil characteristics resulting from differences in models and tunnels are such that when 5 inch-chord and l2-inch-chord data are applied to full-scale propeller design at or near the design condition, differences of less than 1 percent in efficiency will be involved.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Performance of Compressor of XJ-41-V Turbojet Engine, 3, Compressor Static-Pressure Rise at Equivalent Compressor Speeds of 5000, 7000, 8000, and 9000 rpm

Performance of Compressor of XJ-41-V Turbojet Engine, 3, Compressor Static-Pressure Rise at Equivalent Compressor Speeds of 5000, 7000, 8000, and 9000 rpm

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Creagh, John W. R.
Description: At the request of the Air Materiel Command, Army Air Forces, an investigation is being conducted at the NACA Cleveland laboratory to determine the performance characteristics of the XJ-41-V turbojet-engine compressor. The static-pressure variation in the direction of flow through the compressor was presented in reference 1 for an equivalent speed of 8000 rpm. An analysis of these pressure indicated that the maximum-flow limitation of the compressor was caused by separation, which reduced the effective flow area at the vaned-collector entrance. As a result of this analysis, the flow area at the vaned-collector entrance was increased to obtain larger mass flows. The area increase was obtained by cutting back the entrance edges of the collector vanes, which resulted in an increased vaneless-diffuser radius. Comparative performance of the original and revised compressors at an equivalent speed of 8000 rpm is presented. The static-pressure rise through the compressor, determined from static pressures at the impeller entrance and the vaned-collector exit, is also presented together with the compressor adiabatic efficiency and the mass flow over an equivalent speed range from 5000 to 9000 rpm. These static-pressure data are presented for the purpose of correlating the compressor performance with the turbojet-engine performance.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Effectiveness at High Speeds of a 20-Percent-chord Plain Trailing-edge Flap on the NACA 65-210 Airfoil Section

The Effectiveness at High Speeds of a 20-Percent-chord Plain Trailing-edge Flap on the NACA 65-210 Airfoil Section

Date: May 6, 1947
Creator: Stivers, Louis S., Jr.
Description: An analysis has been made of the lift-control effectiveness of a 20-percent-chord plain trailing-edge flap on the NACA 65-210 airfoil section from section lift-coefficient data obtained at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.875. In addition, the effectiveness of the plain flap as a lift-control device has been compared with the corresponding effectiveness of both a spoiler and a dive-recovery flag on the INCA 65-210 airfoil section.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the 19B-2, 19B-8 and 19XB-1 Jet- Propulsion Engines, 4, Analysis of Compressor Performance

Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the 19B-2, 19B-8 and 19XB-1 Jet- Propulsion Engines, 4, Analysis of Compressor Performance

Date: April 4, 1947
Creator: Dietz, Robert O.
Description: Investigations were conducted in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel to determine the performance and operational characteristics of the 19B-2, 19B-8, and 19XS-1 turbojet engines. One objective was to determine the effect of altitude, flight Mach number, and tail-pipe-nozzle area on the performance characteristics of the six-stage and ten-stage axial-flow compressors of the 19B-8 and 19XB-1 engines, respectively, The data were obtained over a range of simulated altitudes and flight Mach numbers. At each simulated flight condition the engine was run over its full operable range of speeds. Performance characteristics of the 19B-8 and 19XB-1 compressors for the range of operation obtainable in the turboJet-engine installation are presented. Compressor characteristics are presented as functions of air flow corrected to sea-level conditions, compressor Mach number, and compressor load coefficient. For the range of compressor operation investigated, changes in Reynolds number had no measurable effect on the relations among compressor Mach number, corrected air flow, compressor load coefficient, compressor pressure ratio, and compressor efficiency. The operating lines for the 19B-8 compressor lay on the low-air-flow side of the region of maximum compressor efficiency; the 19B-8 compressor operated at higher average pressure coefficients per stage and produced a lower over-all pressure ratio than did ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Buffeting of External Fuel Tanks at High Speeds on a Gruman F7F-3 Airplane

Buffeting of External Fuel Tanks at High Speeds on a Gruman F7F-3 Airplane

Date: January 29, 1947
Creator: Turner, Howard L.
Description: Attempts were made to alleviate the buffeting of external fuel tanks mounted under the wings of a twin-engine Navy fighter airplane. The Mach number at which buffeting began was increased from 0,529 to 0.640 by streamlining the sway braces and by increasing the lateral rigidity of the sway brace system. Further increase of the Mach number, at which buffeting began to 0.725, was obtained by moving the external fuel tank to a position under the fuselage.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The stability of the laminar boundary layer in a compressible fluid

The stability of the laminar boundary layer in a compressible fluid

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Lees, Lester
Description: Report is a continuation of a theoretical investigation of the stability of the laminar boundary layer in a compressible fluid. An approximate estimate for the minimum critical Reynolds number, or stability limit, is obtained in terms of the distribution of the kinematic viscosity and the product of the mean density and mean vorticity across the boundary layer. The extension of the results of the stability analysis to laminar boundary-layer gas flows with a pressure gradient in the direction of the free stream is discussed. (author).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the 19B-2, 19B-8, and 19XB-1 Jet-Propulsion Engines. II - Analysis of Turbine Performance of the 19B-8 Engine

Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the 19B-2, 19B-8, and 19XB-1 Jet-Propulsion Engines. II - Analysis of Turbine Performance of the 19B-8 Engine

Date: January 8, 1947
Creator: Krebs, Richard P.
Description: Performance characteristics of the turbine in the 19B-8 jet propulsion engine were determined from an investigation of the complete engine in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. The investigation covered a range of simulated altitudes from 5000 to 30,000 feet and flight Mach numbers from 0.05 to 0.46 for various tail-cone positions over the entire operable range of engine speeds. The characteristics of the turbine are presented as functions of the total-pressure ratio across the turbine and the turbine speed and the gas flow corrected to NACA standard atmospheric conditions at sea level. The effect of changes in altitude, flight Mach number, and tail-cone position on turbine performance is discussed. The turbine efficiency with the tail cone in varied from a maximum of 80.5 percent to minimum of 75 percent over a range of engine speeds from 7500 to 17,500 rpm at a flight Mach number of 0.055. Turbine efficiency was unaffected by changes in altitude up to 15,000 feet but was a function of tail-cone position and flight Mach number. Decreasing the tail-pipe-nozzle outlet area 21 percent reduced the turbine efficiency between 2 and 4.5 percent. The turbine efficiency increased between 1.5 and 3 percent as the flight Mach number ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/5-Scale Model of the Ryan XF2R Airplane

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/5-Scale Model of the Ryan XF2R Airplane

Date: June 27, 1947
Creator: Wong, Park Y.
Description: Wind-tunnel tests on a 1/5-scale model of the Ryan XF2R airplane were conducted to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the air intake for the front power plant, a General Electric TG-100 gas turbine, and to determine the stability and control characteristics of the airplane. The results indicated low-dynamic-pressure recover3- for the air intake to the TG-100 gas turbine ~rith the standard propeller in operation. Propeller cuffs were designed and tested for the purpose of imp~oving the dynamic-pressure recovery. Data obtained with the cuffs installed and the gap between the spinner an& the cuff sealed indicated a substantial gain in dynamic pressure recovery over that obtained with the standard propeller and with the cuffed propeller unsealed. Stability and control tests were conducted with the sealed cuffs installed on the propeller. The data from these tests indicated the following unsatisfactory characteristics for the airplane: 1. Marginal static longitudinal stability. 2. Inadequate directional stability and control. 3. Rudder-pedal-force reversal in the climb condition. 4. Negative dihedral effect in the power-on approach and wave-off conditions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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