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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1920-1929
 Year: 1923
 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
Is there any available source of heat energy lighter than gasoline?

Is there any available source of heat energy lighter than gasoline?

Date: April 1, 1923
Creator: Meyer, P
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Model supports and their effects on the results of wind tunnel tests

Model supports and their effects on the results of wind tunnel tests

Date: February 1, 1923
Creator: Bacon, David L
Description: The airflow about a model while being tested is often sufficiently affected by the model support to lead to erroneous conclusions unless appropriate corrections are used. In this paper some new material on the subject is presented, together with a review of the airfoil support corrections used in several other laboratories.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests on an airplane model, AEG D I of the Allgemeine Elektricitats Gesellschft, A-G, airplane construction section conducted at the Gottingen Model Testing Laboratory for Aerodynamics

Tests on an airplane model, AEG D I of the Allgemeine Elektricitats Gesellschft, A-G, airplane construction section conducted at the Gottingen Model Testing Laboratory for Aerodynamics

Date: February 1, 1923
Creator: Munk, Max
Description: Tests were carried out in the small wind tunnel of the Gottingen establishment on a complete model of the AEG D I airplane. The agreement between the model and the complete airplane applies particularly to the wings, which have ribs cut out of sheet metal and built up in exactly the same manner as in the actual airplane. Various series of tests were carried out with this model in which one or the other of the control surfaces were adjusted to various angles, while the others remained in their neutral positions. During the first three series of tests, the stabilizer was set at a positive angle of 3 degrees, 45' relative to the axis of the engine crankshaft, after which further tests at a 6 degree 30' we made. Finally, the model was tested with the tail group removed. With the elevators set in the prescribed positions, the lift, the drag, and the moments about an axis passing through the center of gravity and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry were measured. All three sets of readings are given as absolute coefficients. Where one of the other control surfaces was deflected from its normal position, the moment produced by that ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The air propeller, its strength and correct shape

The air propeller, its strength and correct shape

Date: February 1, 1923
Creator: Dietsius, H
Description: It is possible to give a propeller such a shape that, under given conditions, viz., a definite speed of revolution and flying speed, the bending stresses in the blades will assume quite an insignificant magnitude.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Determination of climbing ability

Determination of climbing ability

Date: February 1, 1923
Creator: Blasius, H
Description: The vertical distribution of the pressure, temperature, and density of the atmosphere varies from day to day. Thus, rates of climb on different days cannot be compared directly, but must be corrected with reference to a standard rate of diminution of air density with increasing altitude. The following problem, therefore, has to be solved. An airplane has climbed on a certain day under prevailing atmospheric conditions as shown by the barograph. How would the same airplane climb in a standard atmosphere? This problem has already been dealt with by Everling, using the monthly and yearly mean of the vertical temperature distribution. Von Mises solved the problem by arithmetical methods. Here, conditions are examined which shorten or lengthen the climbing time. In establishing the corrected barogram, computation seems more practical than graphical treatment. The basis of the answer to the question answered here is summed up in the remark that lift, drag, propeller thrust, and torque and engine power depend only on the density of the air and do not change with the pressure and temperature, provided that the density remains constant.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Wind tunnel tests of five strut sections in yaw

Wind tunnel tests of five strut sections in yaw

Date: November 1, 1923
Creator: Warner, Edward P
Description: In the first series of wind tunnel tests, the drag and cross wing force of all the struts were measured at a wind speed of 30 mph and at angles of yaw from 0 degrees to 20 degrees. To determine the magnitude of the VL effect, each strut was tested at zero yaw and at a series of speeds ranging from 15 to 38 mph. Although designed as fairings for cables, part of these sections gave such high crosswind forces that they seemed to have possibilities as airfoils. Therefore, the lift (identical with the crosswind force) and drag coefficients were recalculated for four sections on the basis of broadside area to make them comparable with wing coefficients. The general conclusion that the best fineness ratio for a strut is a function of the Reynolds number, decreasing steadily as that quality increases, has of course been reached many times, both by theory and experiment. It was confirmed here once more, and the effect of form on sensitiveness to VL is also strikingly shown. It seems probable that this effect of form is largely due to interaction between the nose and tail, and to the influence which the form of the nose ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Notes on aerodynamic forces on airship hulls

Notes on aerodynamic forces on airship hulls

Date: March 1, 1923
Creator: Tuckerman, L B
Description: For a first approximation the air flow around the airship hull is assumed to obey the laws of perfect (i.e. free from viscosity) incompressible fluid. The flow is further assumed to be free from vortices (or rotational motion of the fluid). These assumptions lead to very great simplifications of the formulae used but necessarily imply an imperfect picture of the actual conditions. The value of the results depends therefore upon the magnitude of the forces produced by the disturbances in the flow caused by viscosity with the consequent production of vortices in the fluid. If these are small in comparison with the forces due to the assumed irrotational perfect fluid flow the results will give a good picture of the actual conditions of an airship in flight.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Flight characteristics

Flight characteristics

Date: August 1, 1923
Creator: STUDENT
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Thrust and power required in climbing

Thrust and power required in climbing

Date: August 1, 1923
Creator: Koenig, George
Description: The following article shows that the phenomena of climbing flight can be determined with sufficient accuracy and represented very clearly, for all flight positions, by means of the thrust diagrams. This method has often given good results.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests on built-up airplane struts having initial tension in outside fibers

Tests on built-up airplane struts having initial tension in outside fibers

Date: August 1, 1923
Creator: Schwamb, T A
Description: The conventional airplane strut fails by buckling. The first signs of failure usually are compression cracks on the concave side of bending. It would therefore appear that if an initial tension could be introduced in the outside fibers, this tension would have to be relieved before the compression load could make itself felt.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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