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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1920-1929
 Year: 1927
 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
A load factor formula

A load factor formula

Date: August 1, 1927
Creator: Miller, Roy G
Description: The ultimate test of a load factor formula is experience. The chief advantages of a semi rational formula over arbitrary factors are that it fairs in between points of experience and it differentiates according to variables within a type. Structural failure of an airplane apparently safe according to the formula would call for a specific change in the formula. The best class of airplanes with which to check a load factor formula seems to be those which have experienced structural failure. Table I comprises a list of the airplanes which have experienced failure in flight traceable to the wing structure. The load factor by formula is observed to be greater than the designed strength in each case, without a single exception. Table II comprises the load factor by formula with the designed strength of a number of well-known service types. The formula indicates that by far the majority of these have ample structural strength. One case considered here in deriving a suitable formula is that of a heavy load carrier of large size and practically no reserve power.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Wall interference in closed type wind tunnels

Wall interference in closed type wind tunnels

Date: March 1, 1927
Creator: Higgins, George J
Description: A series of tests has been conducted by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, in the variable density wind tunnel on several airfoils of different sizes and sections to determine the effect of tunnel wall interference and to determine a correction which can be applied to reduce the error caused thereby. The use of several empirical corrections was attempted with little success. The Prandtl theoretical correction gives the best results and its use is recommended for correcting closed wind tunnel results to conditions of free air.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The installation and correction of compasses in airplanes

The installation and correction of compasses in airplanes

Date: August 1, 1927
Creator: Schoeffel, M F
Description: The saving of time that results from flying across country on compass headings is beginning to be widely recognized. At the same time the general use of steel tube fuselages has made a knowledge of compass correction much more necessary than was the case when wooden fuselages were the rule. This paper has been prepared primarily for the benefit of the pilot who has never studied navigation and who does not desire to go into the subject more deeply than to be able to fly compass courses with confidence. It also contains material for the designer who wishes to install his compasses with the expectation that they may be accurately corrected.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tension experiments on diaphragm metals

Tension experiments on diaphragm metals

Date: August 1, 1927
Creator: Henrickson, H B
Description: Strips of german silver, steel, copper, duralumin, nickel and brass were tested in tension in an apparatus in which the change in deflection with time was measured by means of an interferometer. This change in deflection with time caused by the application and removal of a load is defined as "drift" and "recovery," respectively. It was measured in the time interval from approximately 5 seconds to 5 hours after loading. The data are given in a series of graphs in which the drift and recovery are plotted against time. The proportional drift and recovery in five hours are given for a number of the tests, and in addition are shown graphically for nickel and steel.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Pressure distribution on wing ribs of the VE-7 and TS airplanes in flight

Pressure distribution on wing ribs of the VE-7 and TS airplanes in flight

Date: October 1, 1927
Creator: Rhode, R V
Description: This paper is the first of a series of notes, each of which presents the complete results of pressure distribution tests made by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, on single-wing ribs of the VE-7 and TS airplanes for a particular condition of flight. The level flight results are presented here in the form of curves and show the comparison between the pressure distribution over a representative thin wing, R.A.F.-15, and a moderately thick wing, U.S.A.-27, throughout the range of angle of attack.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Airfoil lift with changing angle of attack

Airfoil lift with changing angle of attack

Date: September 1, 1927
Creator: Reid, Elliott G
Description: Tests have been made in the atmospheric wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to determine the effects of pitching oscillations upon the lift of an airfoil. It has been found that the lift of an airfoil, while pitching, is usually less than that which would exist at the same angle of attack in the stationary condition, although exceptions may occur when the lift is small or if the angle of attack is being rapidly reduced. It is also shown that the behavior of a pitching airfoil may be qualitatively explained on the basis of accepted aerodynamic theory.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Mass distribution and performance of free flight models

Mass distribution and performance of free flight models

Date: October 1, 1927
Creator: Scherberg, Max
Description: This note deals with the mass distribution and performance of free flight models. An airplane model which is to be used in free flight tests must be balanced dynamically as well as statically, e.g., it must not only have a given weight and the proper center of gravity but also a given ellipsoid of inertia. Equations which relate the motions of an airplane and its model are given. Neglecting scale effect, these equations may be used to predict the performance of an airplane, under the action of gravity alone, from data obtained in making dropping tests of a correctly balanced model.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
"A L C L A D" : new corrosion resistant aluminum product

"A L C L A D" : new corrosion resistant aluminum product

Date: August 1, 1927
Creator: Dix, E H , Jr
Description: Described here is a new corrosion resistant aluminum product which is markedly superior to the present strong alloys. Its use should result in greatly increased life of a structural part. Alclad is a heat-treated aluminum, copper, manganese, magnesium alloy that has the corrosion resistance of pure metal at the surface and the strength of the strong alloy underneath. Of particular importance is the thorough character of the union between the alloy and the pure aluminum. Preliminary results of salt spray tests (24 weeks of exposure) show changes in tensile strength and elongation of Alclad 17ST, when any occurred, to be so small as to be well within the limits of experimental error. Some surface corrosion of the pure metal had taken place, but not enough to cause the specimens to break through those areas.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A warning concerning the take-off with heavy load

A warning concerning the take-off with heavy load

Date: July 1, 1927
Creator: Reid, Elliott G
Description: A successful take-off can be made with an airplane so heavily loaded that it cannot climb to a height greater than the span of its wings. The explanation is that the power required to maintain level flight at an altitude of the order of the wing span may be as much as 50 per cent greater than that necessary when the airplane is just clear of the ground. The failure of heavily loaded airplanes to continue climbing at the rate attained immediately after the actual take-off is a grave hazard and has resulted in great risk or catastrophe in three notable cases which are cited.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Study of open jet wind tunnel cones

Study of open jet wind tunnel cones

Date: August 1, 1927
Creator: Weick, Fred E
Description: Tests have been made by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics on the air flow in an open jet wind tunnel with various sizes, shapes, and spacings of cones, and the flow studied by means of velocity and direction surveys in conjunction with flow pictures. It was found that for all combinations of cones tested the flow is essentially the same, consisting of an inner core of decreasing diameter having uniform velocity and direction, and a boundary layer of more or less turbulent air increasing in thickness with length of jet. The energy ratio of the tunnel was obtained for the different combinations of cones, and the spilling around the exit cone causing undesirable air currents in the experiment chamber was noted. An empirical formula is given for the design of cones having no appreciable spilling.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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