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 Serial/Series Title: NACA Advanced Restricted Report
 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
High-altitude cooling. III : Radiators

High-altitude cooling. III : Radiators

Date: September 1, 1944
Creator: Nielsen, Jack Norman
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Theoretical investigation of methods for computing drag from wake surveys at high subsonic speeds

Theoretical investigation of methods for computing drag from wake surveys at high subsonic speeds

Date: June 1, 1945
Creator: Heaslet, Max A
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An empirical formula for the critical shear stress of curved sheets

An empirical formula for the critical shear stress of curved sheets

Date: January 1, 1945
Creator: Levin, L Ross
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effect of normal pressure on the critical compressive and shear stress of curved sheet

Effect of normal pressure on the critical compressive and shear stress of curved sheet

Date: March 1, 1945
Creator: Rafel, Norman & Sandlin, Charles W , Jr
Description: Results are presented of tests of two sets of 20 curved-sheet specimens to determine the effect of normal pressure on the critical compressive and shear stress of curved sheets. It was found that normal pressure raised the critical compressive and shear stress of curved sheets except when outward bulging occurred in compression, in which case the critical stress was lowered by normal pressure. (author).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Measurement of Fuel-Air Ratio by Analysis of the Oxidized Exhaust Gas

The Measurement of Fuel-Air Ratio by Analysis of the Oxidized Exhaust Gas

Date: October 1, 1943
Creator: Memm, J. Lawrence, Jr.
Description: An investigation was made to determine a method of measuring fuel-air ratio that could be used for test purposes in flight and for checking conventional equipment in the laboratory. Two single-cylinder test engines equipped with typical commercial engine cylinders were used. The fuel-air ratio of the mixture delivered to the engines was determined by direct measurement of the quantity of air and of fuel supplied and also by analysis of the oxidized exhaust gas and of the normal exhaust gas. Five fuels were used: gasoline that complied with Army-Navy Fuel Specification, No. AN-VV-F-781 and four mixtures of this gasoline with toluene, benzene, and xylene. The method of determining the fuel-air ratio described in this report involves the measurement of the carbon-dioxide content of the oxidized exhaust gas and the use of graphs or the presented equation. This method is considered useful in aircraft, in the field, or in the laboratory for a range of fuel-air ratios from 0.047 to 0.124.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Design of power-plant installations pressure-loss characteristics of duct components

Design of power-plant installations pressure-loss characteristics of duct components

Date: June 1, 1944
Creator: Henry, John R
Description: A correlation of what are believed to be the most reliable data available on duct components of aircraft power-plant installations is presented. The information is given in a convenient form and is offered as an aid in designing duct systems and, subject to certain qualifications, as a guide in estimating their performance. The design and performance data include those for straight ducts; simple bends of square, circular, and elliptical cross sections; compound bends; diverging and converging bends; vaned bends; diffusers; branch ducts; internal inlets; and an angular placement of heat exchangers. Examples are included to illustrate methods of applying these data in analyzing duct systems. (author).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The conformal transformation of an airfoil into a straight line and its application to the inverse problem of airfoil theory

The conformal transformation of an airfoil into a straight line and its application to the inverse problem of airfoil theory

Date: December 1, 1944
Creator: Mutterperl, William
Description: A method of conformal transformation is developed that maps an airfoil into a straight line, the line being chosen as the extended chord line of the airfoil. The mapping is accomplished by operating directly with the airfoil ordinates. The absence of any preliminary transformation is found to shorten the work substantially over that of previous methods. Use is made of the superposition of solutions to obtain a rigorous counterpart of the approximate methods of thin-airfoils theory. The method is applied to the solution of the direct and inverse problems for arbitrary airfoils and pressure distributions. Numerical examples are given. Applications to more general types of regions, in particular to biplanes and to cascades of airfoils, are indicated. (author).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic tests of a full-scale TBF-1 aileron installation in the Langley 16-foot high-speed tunnel

Aerodynamic tests of a full-scale TBF-1 aileron installation in the Langley 16-foot high-speed tunnel

Date: December 1, 1944
Creator: Becker, John V
Description: The failure of wing panels on a number of TBF-1 and TBM-1 airplanes in flight has prompted several investigations of the possible causes of failure. This report describes tests in the Langley 16-foot high-speed tunnel to determine whether these failures could be attributed to changes in the aerodynamic characteristics of the ailerons at high speeds. The tests were made of a 12-foot-span section including the tip and aileron of the right wing of a TBF-1 airplane. Hinge moments, control-link stresses due to aerodynamic buffeting, and fabric-deflection photographs were obtained at true airspeeds ranging from 110 to 365 miles per hour. The aileron hinge-moment coefficients were found to vary only slightly with airspeed in spite of the large fabric deflections that developed as the speed was increased. An analysis of these results indicated that the resultant hinge moment of the ailerons as installed in the airplane would tend to restore the ailerons to their neutral position for all the high-speed flight conditions covered in the tests. Serious aerodynamic buffeting occurred at up aileron angles of -10 degrees or greater because of stalling of the sharp projecting lip of the Frise aileron. The peak stresses set up in the aileron control linkages ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Torsion tests of stiffened circular cylinders

Torsion tests of stiffened circular cylinders

Date: May 1, 1944
Creator: Moore, R L
Description: The design of curved sheet panels to resist shear involves a consideration of several factors: the buckling resistance of the sheet, the stress at which buckling becomes permanent, and the strength which may be developed beyond the buckling limit by tension-field action. Although some experimental as well as theoretical work has been done on the buckling and tension-field phases of this problem, neither of these types of action appears to be very well understood. The problem is of sufficient importance from the standpoint of aircraft design, it is believed, to warrant further experimental investigation. This report presents the results of the first series of torsion tests of stiffened circular cylinders to be completed in connection with this study at Aluminum Research Laboratories. (author).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Wind-tunnel calibration and correction procedures for three-dimensional models

Wind-tunnel calibration and correction procedures for three-dimensional models

Date: October 1, 1944
Creator: Swanson, Robert S
Description: Detailed methods are presented for determining the corrections to results from wind-tunnel tests of three-dimensional models for the effects of the model-support system, the nonuniform air flow in the tunnel, and the tunnel walls or jet boundaries. The procedures for determining the corrections are illustrated by equations and the required tests are discussed. Particular attention is given to the parts of the procedures dealing with drag measurements. Two general methods that are used for determining and applying the corrections to force tests are discussed. Some discussion is also included of the correction procedures to be used for wake survey tests. The methods described in this report apply only to tests at subcritical speeds. (author).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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