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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
Results 13301 - 13350 of 13,793
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The Interaction of a Reflected Shock Wave with the Boundary Layer in a Shock Tube
Ideally, the reflection of a shock from the closed end of a shock tube provides, for laboratory study, a quantity of stationary gas at extremely high temperature. Because of the action of viscosity, however, the flow in the real case is not one-dimensional, and a boundary layer grows in the fluid following the initial shock wave. In this paper simplifying assumptions are made to allow an analysis of the interaction of the shock reflected from the closed end with the boundary layer of the initial shock afterflow. The analysis predicts that interactions of several different types will exist in different ranges of initial shock Mach number. It is shown that the cooling effect of the wall on the afterflow boundary layer accounts for the change in interaction type. An experiment is carried out which verifies the existence of the several interaction regions and shows that they are satisfactorily predicted by the theory. Along with these results, sufficient information is obtained from the experiments to make possible a model for the interaction in the most complicated case. This model is further verified by measurements made during the experiment. The case of interaction with a turbulent boundary layer is also considered. Identifying the type of interaction with the state of turbulence of the interacting boundary layer allows for an estimate of the state of turbulence of the boundary layer based on an experimental investigation of the type of interaction. A method is proposed whereby the effect of the boundary-layer interaction on the strength of the reflected shock may be calculated. The calculation indicates that the reflected shock is rapidly attenuated for a short distance after reflection, and this result compares favorably with available experimental results. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64474/
Investigation of Aperiodic Time Processes with Autocorrelation and Fourier Analysis
Autocorrelation and frequency analyses of a series of aperiodic time events, in particular, filtered noises and sibilant sounds, were made. The position and band width of the frequency ranges are best obtained from the frequency analysis, but the energies contained in the several bands are most easily obtained from the autocorrelation function. The mean number of zero crossings of the time function was determined from the curvature of the latter function in the vicinity of the zero crossing, and also with the aid of a decimal counter. The second method was found to be more exact. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64460/
Measurements of total hemispherical emissivity of various oxidized metals at high temperature
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57049/
A method for the calculation of wave drag on supersonic-edged wings and biplanes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57270/
NACA Conference on high-speed aerodynamics
This document contains reproductions of technical papers presented by staff members of the NACA Laboratories at the NACA Conference on High-Speed Aerodynamics held at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory of the NACA, March 18, 19, and 20, 1958. The primary purpose of this conference was to convey to the military services and their contractors the results of recent research results and to provide those attending an opportunity to discuss the results. The papers in this document were prepared for presentation at the conference and are considered as complementary to, rather than as substitutes for, the Committee's more complete and formal reports. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63693/
Prandtl-Meyer expansion of chemically reacting gases in local chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57264/
Pressure distributions at transonic speeds for parabolic-arc bodies of revolution having fineness ratios of 10, 12, and 14
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57276/
Propellant vaporization as a criterion for rocket engine design : relation between percentage of propellant vaporized and engine performance
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57168/
Skin-friction measurements in incompressible flow
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57266/
Transient heating effects on the bending strength of integral aluminum-alloy box beams
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57038/
Wall pressure fluctuations in a turbulent boundary layer
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56828/
Static longitudinal and lateral stability and control characteristics of a model of a swept-wing fighter-bomber-type airplane with a top inlet at Mach numbers from 1.6 to 2.35
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64226/
Summary of locations, extents, and intensities of turbulent areas encountered during flight investigations of the jet stream from January 7, 1957 to April 28, 1957
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64475/
Effect of a hot-jet exhaust on pressure distributions and external drag of several afterbodies on a single-engine airplane model at transonic speeds
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64078/
The effects of a modified roll-command system on the flight-path stability and tracking accuracy of an automatic interceptor
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63832/
Study of exit phase of flight of a very high altitude hypersonic airplane by means of a pilot-controlled analog computer
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63940/
Effects of surface roughness and extreme cooling on boundary-layer transition for 15 deg cone-cylinder in free flight at Mach numbers to 7.6
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53340/
Experimental investigation of the effect of circumferential inlet flow distortion on the performance of a five-stage axial-flow research compressor with transonic rotors in all stages
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64157/
Performance of a two-dimensional cascade inlet at a free-stream Mach number of 3.05 and at angles of attack of -3 degrees, 0 degrees, 3 degrees, and 6 degrees
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64006/
Effects of canard surface size on stability and control characteristics of two canard airplane configuration at Mach numbers of 1.41 and 2.01
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63923/
Investigation of a high-flow transonic-compressor inlet stage having a hub-tip radius of 0.35
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63716/
Investigation of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a trapezoidal-wing airplane model with various vertical positions of wing and horizontal tail at Mach numbers of 1.41 and 2.01
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63712/
Supersonic Wave Interference Affecting Stability
Some of the significant interference fields that may affect stability of aircraft at supersonic speeds are briefly summarized. Illustrations and calculations are presented to indicate the importance of interference fields created by wings, bodies, wing-body combinations, jets, and nacelles. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65257/
Effect of distributed granular-type roughness on boundary-layer transition at supersonic speeds with and without surface cooling
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63744/
Experimental lift-drag ratios for two families of wing-body combinations at supersonic speeds
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63714/
Longitudinal and lateral stability and control characteristics at Mach number 2.01 of a 60 degree delta-wing airplane configuration equipped with a canard control and with wing trailing-edge flap controls
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63755/
Some Experimental Heating Data on Convex and Concave Hemispherical Nose Shapes and Hemispherical Depressions on a 30 Deg Blunted Nose Cone
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53146/
Wind-Tunnel Investigation at a Mach Number of 2.01 of the Aerodynamic Characteristics in Combined Angles of Attack and Sideslip of Several Hypersonic Missile Configurations with Various Canard Controls
An investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of several hypersonic missile configurations with various canard controls for an angle-of-attack range from 0 deg to about 28 deg at sideslip angles of about 0 deg and 4 deg at a Mach number of 2.01 has been made in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel. The configurations tested were a body alone which had a ratio of length to diameter of 10, the body with a 10 deg flare, the body with cruciform fins of 5 deg or 15 deg apex angle, and a flare-stabilized rocket model with a modified Von Karman nose. Various canard surfaces for pitch control only were tested on the body with the 10 deg flare and on the body with both sets of fins. The results indicated that the addition of a flared afterbody or cruciform fins produced configurations which were longitudinally and directionally stable. The body with 5 deg fins should be capable of producing higher normal accelerations than the flared body. A l l of the canard surfaces were effective longitudinal controls which produced net positive increments of normal force and pitching moments which progressively decreased with increasing angle of attack. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc52987/
An Analog Study of the Influence of Internal Modifications to a Wing Leading Edge on Its Transient Temperature Rise During Highspeed Flight
Aerodynamic heating of sweptback wing leading edge. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc52906/
Section thrust coefficients for a full-scale, three-blade, supersonic-type propeller operating at low and negative blade angles
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63708/
Two-dimensional cascade investigation at Mach numbers up to 1.0 of NACA 65-series blade sections at conditions typical of compressor tips
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63872/
Aerodynamic and inlet-flow-field characteristics at a free-stream Mach number of 3.0 for airplanes with circular fuselage cross sections and for two engine locations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64014/
Analysis of two-stage counterrotating turbine efficiencies in terms of work and speed requirements
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64009/
Calculation of flutter characteristics for finite-span swept or unswept wings at subsonic and supersonic speeds by a modified strip analysis
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63849/
Investigation of two bluff shapes in axial free flight over a Mach number range from 0.35 and 2.15
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63741/
Investigation of two bluff shapes in axial free flight over a Mach number range from 0.35 to 2.15
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53191/
Preliminary investigation of land-water operation with a 1/10-scale model of a jet airplane equipped with hydro-skis
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64062/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a canard and an outboard-tail airplane model at a Mach number of 2.01
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64138/
The effects of body vortices and the wing shock-expansion field on the pitch-up characteristics of supersonic airplanes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63896/
The effects of body vortices and the wing shock-expansion field on the pitch-up characteristics of supersonic airplanes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53202/
Feasibility of nose-cone cooling by the upstream ejection of solid coolants at the stagnation point
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63925/
Heat transfer to 0 degree and 75 degree swept blunt leading edges in free flight at Mach numbers from 1.90 to 3.07
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63727/
Preliminary study of airplane configurations having tail surfaces outboard of the wing tips
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64131/
Wind-tunnel data on the longitudinal and lateral-directional rotary derivatives of a straight-wing, research airplane configuration at Mach numbers from 2.5 to 3.5
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63730/
Acoustic, thrust, and drag characteristics of several full-scale noise suppressors for turbojet engines
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57452/
The adhesion of molten boron oxide to various materials
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64004/
Analysis of harmonic forces produced at hub by imbalances in helicopter rotor blades
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57238/
Analysis of turbulent flow and heat transfer on a flat plate at high Mach numbers with variable fluid properties
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57461/
An approximate method for design or analysis of two-dimensional subsonic-flow passages
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57320/
Central automatic data processing system
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57108/