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 Decade: 1940-1949
 Year: 1947
 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
Analysis of jet-propulsion-engine combustion-chamber pressure losses

Analysis of jet-propulsion-engine combustion-chamber pressure losses

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Pinkel, I Irving
Description: The development and the use of a chart for estimating the pressure losses in jet-engine combustion chambers are described. By means of the chart, the pressure losses due to fluid friction and to momentum changes in the air flow accompanying combustion can be separately evaluated. The pressure-loss chart is based on the assumption that the pressure losses in the actual combustion chamber can be matched by those of an equivalent combustion chamber of constant cross-sectional area. The concept of the equivalent combustion chamber serves as a convenient basis for comparing the pressure-loss characteristics of combustion chambers of a variety of designs. The over-all pressure losses computed from the pressure-loss chart are within 7 percent of the experimental values for the three types of combustion chambers considered herein.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Analysis of performance of jet engine from characteristics of components I : aerodynamic and matching characteristics of turbine component determined with cold air

Analysis of performance of jet engine from characteristics of components I : aerodynamic and matching characteristics of turbine component determined with cold air

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Goldstein, Arthur W
Description: The performance of the turbine component of an NACA research jet engine was investigated with cold air. The interaction and the matching of the turbine with the NACA eight-stage compressor were computed with the combination considered as a jet engine. The over-all performance of the engine was then determined. The internal aerodynamics were studied to the extent of investigating the performance of the first stator ring and its influence on the turbine performance. For this ring, the stream-filament method for computing velocity distribution permitted efficient sections to be designed, but the design condition of free-vortex flow with uniform axial velocities was not obtained.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An analysis of the compressive strength of honeycomb cores for sandwich construction

An analysis of the compressive strength of honeycomb cores for sandwich construction

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Norris, Charles B
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An analysis of the full-floating journal bearing

An analysis of the full-floating journal bearing

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Shaw, M C
Description: An analysis of the operating characteristics of a full-floating journal bearing, a bearing in which a floating sleeve is located between the journal and bearing surfaces, is presented together with charts from which the performance of such bearings may be predicted. Examples are presented to illustrate the use of these charts and a limited number of experiments conducted upon a glass full-floating bearing are reported to verify some results of the analysis.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An Anaylsis of Control Requirements and Control Parameters for Direct-Coupled Turbojet Engines

An Anaylsis of Control Requirements and Control Parameters for Direct-Coupled Turbojet Engines

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Novik, David
Description: Requirements of an automatic engine control, as affected by engine characteristics, have been analyzed for a direct-coupled turbojet engine. Control parameters for various conditions of engine operation are discussed. A hypothetical engine control is presented to illustrate the use of these parameters. An adjustable speed governor was found to offer a desirable method of over-all engine control. The selection of a minimum value of fuel flow was found to offer a means of preventing unstable burner operation during steady-state operation. Until satisfactory high-temperature-measuring devices are developed, air-fuel ratio is considered to be a satisfactory acceleration-control parameter for the attainment of the maximum acceleration rates consistent with safe turbine temperatures. No danger of unstable burner operation exists during acceleration if a temperature-limiting acceleration control is assumed to be effective. Deceleration was found to be accompanied by the possibility of burner blow-out even if a minimum fuel-flow control that prevents burner blow-out during steady-state operation is assumed to be effective. Burner blow-out during deceleration may be eliminated by varying the value of minimum fuel flow as a function of compressor-discharge pressure, but in no case should the fuel flow be allowed to fall below the value required for steady-state burner operation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Application of the analogy between water flow with a free surface and two-dimensional compressible gas flow

Application of the analogy between water flow with a free surface and two-dimensional compressible gas flow

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Orlin, W James
Description: The theory of the hydraulic analogy -- that is, the analogy between water flow with a free surface and two-dimensional compressible gas flow -- and the limitations and conditions of the analogy are discussed. A test was run using the hydraulic analogy as applied to the flow about circular cylinders of various diameters at subsonic velocities extending into the supercritical range. The apparatus and techniques used in this application are described and criticized. Reasonably satisfactory agreement of pressure distributions and flow fields existed between water and air flow about corresponding bodies. This agreement indicated the possibility of extending experimental compressibility research by new methods.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Charts for determining the characteristics of sharp-nose airfoils in two-dimensional flow at supersonic speeds

Charts for determining the characteristics of sharp-nose airfoils in two-dimensional flow at supersonic speeds

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Ivey, H Reese
Description: Solutions of the Hugoniot shock equations and Meyer expansion equations are plotted in such a manner as to permit the pressure distribution, the local Mach number, and the angles of shock waves on arbitrary sharp-nose airfoils at supersonic speeds to be obtained directly. (author).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Column and plate compressive strengths of aircraft structural martials extruded 0-1HTA magnesium alloy

Column and plate compressive strengths of aircraft structural martials extruded 0-1HTA magnesium alloy

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Heimerl, George J
Description: Column and plate compressive strengths of extruded 0-1HTA magnesium alloy were determined both within and beyond the elastic range from tests of flat end H-section columns and from local instability tests of H-, Z-, and channel section columns. These tests are part of an extensive research investigation to provide data on the structural strength of various aircraft materials. The results are presented in the form of curves and charts that are suitable for use in the design and analysis of aircraft structures.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Compressible Flow Tables for Air

Compressible Flow Tables for Air

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Burcher, Marie A.
Description: This paper contains a tabulation of functions of the Mach number which are frequently used in high-speed aerodynamics. The tables extend from M = 0 to M = 10.0 in increments of 0.01 and are based on the assumption that air is a perfect gas having a specific heat ratio of 1.400.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cooling Characteristics of the V-1650-7 Engine. II - Effect of Coolant Conditions on Cylinder Temperatures and Heat Rejection at Several Engine Powers

Cooling Characteristics of the V-1650-7 Engine. II - Effect of Coolant Conditions on Cylinder Temperatures and Heat Rejection at Several Engine Powers

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Povolny, John H.
Description: An investigation has been conducted on a V-1650-7 engine to determine the cylinder temperatures and the coolant and oil heat rejections over a range of coolant flows (50 to 200 gal/min) and oil inlet temperatures (160 to 2150 F) for two values of coolant outlet temperature (250 deg and 275 F) at each of four power conditions ranging from approximately 1100 to 2000 brake horsepower. Data were obtained for several values of block-outlet pressure at each of the two coolant outlet temperatures. A mixture of 30 percent by volume of ethylene glycol and 70-percent water was used as the coolant. The effect of varying coolant flow, coolant outlet temperature, and coolant outlet pressure over the ranges investigated on cylinder-head temperatures was small (0 deg to 25 F) whereas the effect of increasing the engine power condition from ll00 to 2000 brake horsepower was large (maximum head-temperature increase, 110 F).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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