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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
Experiments with fabrics for covering airplane wings

Experiments with fabrics for covering airplane wings

Date: April 1, 1923
Creator: Proell, A
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The comparison of well-known and new wing sections tested in the variable density wind tunnel

The comparison of well-known and new wing sections tested in the variable density wind tunnel

Date: May 1, 1925
Creator: Higgins, George J
Description: Three groups of airfoils have been tested in the variable density wind tunnel. The first group contains three airfoils. The second group is a systematic series of twenty-seven airfoils. The third group consists of several frequently used wing sections.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The estimation of airplane performance from wind tunnel tests on conventional airplane models

The estimation of airplane performance from wind tunnel tests on conventional airplane models

Date: May 1, 1925
Creator: Warner, Edward P & Ober, Shatswell
Description: Calculations of the magnitude of the correction factors and the range of their variations for wind tunnel models used in making aircraft performance predictions were made for 23 wind tunnel models. Calculated performances were compared with those actually determined for such airplanes as have been built and put through flight test. Except as otherwise noted, all the models have interplane struts and diagonal struts formed to streamwise shape. Wires were omitted in all cases. All the models were about 18 inches in span and were tested in a 4-foot wind tunnel. Results are given in tabular form.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The drift of an aircraft guided towards it's destination by directional receiving of radio signals transmitted from the ground

The drift of an aircraft guided towards it's destination by directional receiving of radio signals transmitted from the ground

Date: June 1, 1925
Creator: unknown
Description: Following a curved path increases the distance to be flown, and a type of radio navigation that forces the adoption of such a path is therefore less efficient than one that marks out a definite straight line between the point of departure and the intended destination, and holds the airplane to that line. To determine the loss of efficiency resulting from curvature of the path, calculations were made for two particular cases by the method of step-by-step integration. The calculations were based on the assumption that the pilot makes straightforward use of his radio for navigation and makes no allowance for drift. Results are given in tabular form for two airplanes flying 200 miles at 100 mph, one with a cross wind of 50 mph wind across course, and the other with a 20 mph wind across course. It is shown that the following of the curved path increases the time of flight and the air distance flown by 17 percent and 2.5 percent in the two cases.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Propeller design: extension of test data on a family of model propellers by means of the modified blade element theory II

Propeller design: extension of test data on a family of model propellers by means of the modified blade element theory II

Date: May 1, 1926
Creator: Weick, Fred E
Description: This report is the second of a series of four on propeller design, and describes the method used to extend the data obtained from tests on a family of thirteen model propellers to include all propellers of the same form likely to be met in practice. This necessitates the development of a method of propeller analysis which when used to calculate the powers and efficiencies gives results which check the tests throughout their range.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Determination of the value of wood for structural purposes

Determination of the value of wood for structural purposes

Date: April 1, 1923
Creator: Baumann, Richard
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Droplet Impingement and Ingestion by Supersonic Nose Inlet in Subsonic Tunnel Conditions

Droplet Impingement and Ingestion by Supersonic Nose Inlet in Subsonic Tunnel Conditions

Date: May 1, 1958
Creator: Gelder, Thomas F.
Description: The amount of water in cloud droplet form ingested by a full-scale supersonic nose inlet with conical centerbody was measured in the NACA Lewis icing tunnel. Local and total water impingement rates on the cowl and centerbody surfaces were also obtained. All measurements were made with a dye-tracer technique. The range of operating and meteorological conditions studied was: angles of attack of 0 deg and 4.2 deg, volume-median droplet diameters from about 11 to 20 microns, and ratios of inlet to free-stream velocity from about 0.4 to 1.8. Although the inlet was designed for supersonic (Mach 2.0) operation of the aircraft, the tunnel measurements were confined to a free-stream velocity of 156 knots (Mach 0.237). The data are extendable to other subsonic speeds and droplet sizes by dimensionless impingement parameters. Impingement and ingestion efficiencies are functions of the ratio of inlet to free-stream velocity as well as droplet size. For the model and range of conditions studied, progressively increasing the inlet velocity ratio from less than to greater than 1.0 increased the centerbody impingement efficiency and shifted the cowl impingement region from the inner- to outer-cowl surfaces, respectively. The ratio of water ingested by the inlet plane to that contained ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Impingement of Cloud Droplets on a Cylinder and Procedure for Measuring Liquid-Water Content and Droplet Sizes in Supercooled Clouds by Rotating Multicylinder Method

Impingement of Cloud Droplets on a Cylinder and Procedure for Measuring Liquid-Water Content and Droplet Sizes in Supercooled Clouds by Rotating Multicylinder Method

Date: January 1, 1955
Creator: Brun, R. J.; Lewis, W.; Perkins, P. J. & Serafini, J. S.
Description: No abstract available.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Impingement of Cloud Droplets on 36.5-Percent-Thick Joukowski Airfoil at Zero Angle of Attack and Discussion of Use as Cloud Measuring Instrument in Dye-Tracer Technique

Impingement of Cloud Droplets on 36.5-Percent-Thick Joukowski Airfoil at Zero Angle of Attack and Discussion of Use as Cloud Measuring Instrument in Dye-Tracer Technique

Date: September 1, 1957
Creator: Brun, R. J. & Vogt, Dorothea E.
Description: The trajectories of droplets i n the air flowing past a 36.5-percent-thick Joukowski airfoil at zero angle of attack were determined. The amount of water i n droplet form impinging on the airfoil, the area of droplet impingement, and the rate of droplet impingement per unit area on the airfoil surface were calculated from the trajectories and cover a large range of flight and atmospheric conditions. With the detailed impingement information available, the 36.5-percent-thick Joukowski airfoil can serve the dual purpose of use as the principal element in instruments for making measurements in clouds and of a basic shape for estimating impingement on a thick streamlined body. Methods and examples are presented for illustrating some limitations when the airfoil is used as the principal element in the dye-tracer technique.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Impingement of Droplets in 60 Deg Elbows with Potential Flow

Impingement of Droplets in 60 Deg Elbows with Potential Flow

Date: October 1, 1956
Creator: Hacker, Paul T.; Saper, Paul G. & Kadow, Charles F.
Description: Trajectories were determined for water droplets or other aerosol particles in air flowing through 600 elbows especially designed for two-dimensional potential motion. The elbows were established by selecting as walls of each elbow two streamlines of a flow field produced by a complex potential function that establishes a two-dimensional flow around. a 600 bend. An unlimited number of elbows with slightly different shapes can be established by selecting different pairs of streamlines as walls. Some of these have a pocket on the outside wall. The elbows produced by the complex potential function are suitable for use in aircraft air-inlet ducts and have the following characteristics: (1) The resultant velocity at any point inside the elbow is always greater than zero but never exceeds the velocity at the entrance. (2) The air flow field at the entrance and exit is almost uniform and rectilinear. (3) The elbows are symmetrical with respect to the bisector of the angle of bend. These elbows should have lower pressure losses than bends of constant cross-sectional area. The droplet impingement data derived from the trajectories are presented along with equations so that collection efficiency, area, rate, and distribution of droplet impingement can be determined for any ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department