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 Serial/Series Title: NACA Advanced Confidential Report
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Special Report
 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
Tests of a heated low-drag airfoil

Tests of a heated low-drag airfoil

Date: December 1, 1942
Creator: Frick, C. W., Jr. & Mccullough, G. B.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A profile-drag investigation in flight on an experimental fighter-type airplane the North American XP-51

A profile-drag investigation in flight on an experimental fighter-type airplane the North American XP-51

Date: January 1, 1942
Creator: Zalovcik, J. A.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Wind-Tunnel Development of Ailerons for the Curtiss XP-60 Airplanem Special Report

Wind-Tunnel Development of Ailerons for the Curtiss XP-60 Airplanem Special Report

Date: September 1, 1942
Creator: Rogallo, F. M. & Lowry, John G.
Description: An investigation was made in the LWAL 7- by 10-foot tunnel of internally balanced, sealed ailerons for the Curtiss XP-60 airplane. Ailerons with tabs and. with various amounts of balance were tested. Stick forces were estimated for several aileron arrangements including an arrangement recommended for the airplane. Flight tests of the recommended arrangement are discussed briefly in an appendix, The results of the wind-tunnel and flight tests indicate that the ailerons of large or fast airplanes may be satisfactorily balanced by the method developed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
NACA Radio Ground-Speed System for Aircraft, Special Report

NACA Radio Ground-Speed System for Aircraft, Special Report

Date: February 1, 1943
Creator: Hastings, Charles E.
Description: A method that utilizes the Doppler effect on radio signals for determining the speed of an airplane and the distance traveled by the airplane has been developed and found to operate satisfactorily. In this method, called the NACA radio ground-speed system, standard readily available radio equipment is used almost exclusively and extreme frequency stability of the transmitters is not necessary. No complicated equipment need be carried in the airplane, as the standard radio transmitter is usually adequate. Actual flight tests were made in which the method was used and the results were consistent with calibrated air speed indications and stop-watch measurements. Inasmuch as the fundamental accuracy of the radio method is far better than either of the checking systems used, no check was made on the limitations of the accuracy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Determination of Flight Paths of an SBD-1 Airplane in Simulated Diving Attacks, Special Report

Determination of Flight Paths of an SBD-1 Airplane in Simulated Diving Attacks, Special Report

Date: March 1, 1943
Creator: Johnson, Harold I.
Description: An investigation has been made to determine the motions of and the flight paths describe by a Navy dive-bombing airplane in simulated diving attacks. The data necessary to evaluate these items, with the exception of the atmospheric wind data, were obtained from automatic recording instruments installed entirely within the airplane. The atmospheric wind data were obtained from the ground by the balloon-theodolite method. The results of typical dives at various dive angles are presented in the form of time histories of the motion of the airplane as well as flight paths calculated with respect to still air and with respect to the ground.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Effect of Compressibility on the Growth of the Laminar Boundary Layer on Low-Drag Wings and Bodies

The Effect of Compressibility on the Growth of the Laminar Boundary Layer on Low-Drag Wings and Bodies

Date: January 1, 1943
Creator: Allen, H. Julian & Nitzberg, Gerald E.
Description: The development of the laminar boundary layer in a compressible fluid is considered. Formulas are given for determining the boundary-layer thickness and the ratio of the boundary-layer Reynolds number to the body Reynolds number for airfoils and bodies of revolution. It i s shown that the effect of compressibility will profoundly alter the Reynolds number corresponding to the upper limit of the range of the low-drag coefficients . The available data indicate that for low-drag and high critical compressibility speed airfoils and bodies of revolution, this effect is favorable.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Study of Turning Performance of a Fighter-Type Airplane Particularly as Affected by Flaps and Increased Supercharging, Special Report

Study of Turning Performance of a Fighter-Type Airplane Particularly as Affected by Flaps and Increased Supercharging, Special Report

Date: June 1, 1942
Creator: Wetmore, J. W.
Description: Results of a study to determine the effects on turning performance due to various assumed modifications to a typical Naval fighter airplane are presented. The modifications considered included flaps of various types, both part and full space, increased supercharging, and increased wing loading. The calculations indicated that near the low-speed end of the speed range, the turning performance, as defined by steady level turns at a given speed, would be improved to some extent by any of the flaps considered at altitudes up to about 25,000 feet. (If turning is not restricted to the conditions of no loss of speed or altitude, more rapid turning can, of course, be accomplished with the aid of flaps, regardless of altitude.) Fowler flaps and NACA slotted flaps appeared somewhat superior to split or perforated split flaps for maneuvering purposes, particularly if the flap position is not adjustable. Similarly, better turning performance should be realized with full-span than with part-span flaps. Turning performance over the lower half of the speed range would probably not be materially improved at any altitude by increased supercharging of the engine unless the propeller were redesigned to absorb the added power more effectively; with a suitable propeller the turning ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effects of Direction of Propeller Rotation on the Longitudinal Stability of the 1/10-Scale Model of the North American XB-28 Airplane with Flaps Neutral, Special Report

Effects of Direction of Propeller Rotation on the Longitudinal Stability of the 1/10-Scale Model of the North American XB-28 Airplane with Flaps Neutral, Special Report

Date: June 1, 1942
Creator: Delany, Noel K.
Description: The effects of direction of propeller rotation on factors affecting the longitudinal stability of the XB-28 airplane were measured on a 1/10-scale model in the 7- by 10-foot tunnel of the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory. The main effect observed was that caused by regions of high downwash behind the nacelles (power off as well as power on with flaps neutral). The optimum direction of propeller rotation, both propellers rotating up toward the fuselage, shifted this region off the horizontal tail and thus removed its destabilizing effect. Rotating both propellers downward toward the fuselage moved it inboard on the tail and accentuated the effect, while rotating both propellers right hand had an intermediate result. Comparisons are made of the tail effects as measured by force tests with those predicted from the point-by-point downwash and velocity surveys in the region of the tail. These surveys in turn are compared with the results predicted from available theory.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Investigation of the Effect of Compressibility on the Maximum Lift Coefficient, Special Report

Preliminary Investigation of the Effect of Compressibility on the Maximum Lift Coefficient, Special Report

Date: February 1, 1943
Creator: Stack, John; Fedziuk, Henry A. & Cleary, Harold E.
Description: Preliminary data are presented on the variation of the maximum lift coefficient with Mach number. The data were obtained from tests in the 8-foot high-speed tunnel of three NACA 16-series airfoils of 1-foot chord. Measurements consisted primarily of pressure-distribution measurements in order to illustrate the nature of the phenomena. It was found that the maximum lift coefficient of airfoils is markedly affected by compressibility even at Mach numbers as low as 0.2. At high Mach numbers pronounced decrease of the maximum lift coefficient was found. The magnitude of the effects of compressibility on the maximum lift coefficient and the low speeds at which these effects first appear indicate clearly that consideration of the take-off thrust for propellers will give results seriously in error if these considerations are based on the usual low-speed maximum-lift-coefficient data generally used.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Wind-Tunnel Tests of the Effect of Nacelles on the Characteristics of a Twin-Engine Bomber Model with Low-Drag Wing, Special Report

Preliminary Wind-Tunnel Tests of the Effect of Nacelles on the Characteristics of a Twin-Engine Bomber Model with Low-Drag Wing, Special Report

Date: July 1, 1942
Creator: Wenzinger, Carl J. & Sivells, James C.
Description: Tests were made in the NACA 19-foot pressure tunnel of a simplified twin-engine bomber model with an NACA low-drag wing primarily to obtain an indication of the effects of engine nacelles on the characteristics of the model both with and without simple split trailing-edge flaps. Nacelles with conventional-type cowlings representative of those used on an existing high-performance airplane and with NACA high-speed type E cowlings were tested. The tests were made without propeller slipstream. The aerodynamic effects of adding the nacelles to the low-drag wing were similar to the effects commonly obtained by adding similar nacelles to conventional wings. The maximum lift coefficient without flaps was slightly increased, but the increment in maximum lift due to deflecting the flaps was somewhat decreased. The stalling characteristics were improved by the presence of the nacelles. Addition of the nacelles had a destabilizing effect on the pitching moments, as is usual for nacelles that project forward of the wing. The drag increments due to the nacelles were of the usual order of magnitude, with the increment due to the nacelles with NACA type E cowlings approximately one-third less than that of the nacelles with conventional cowlings with built-in air scoops.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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