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 Decade: 1940-1949
 Year: 1947
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Memorandums
 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
Analytical Treatment of Normal Condensation Shock

Analytical Treatment of Normal Condensation Shock

Date: July 1, 1947
Creator: Heybey
Description: The condensation of water vapor in an air consequences: acquisition of heat (liberated heat vaporization; loss of mass on the part of the flowing gas (water vapor is converted to liquid); change in the specific gas constants and of the ratio k of the specific heats (caused by change of gas composition). A discontinuous change of state is therefore connected with the condensation; schlieren photographs of supersonic flows in two-dimensional Laval nozzles show two intersecting oblique shock fronts that in the case of high humidities may merge near the point of intersection into one normal shock front.
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The Calculation of Compressible Flows with Local Regions of Supersonic Velocity

The Calculation of Compressible Flows with Local Regions of Supersonic Velocity

Date: March 1, 1947
Creator: Goethert, B. & Kawalki, K. H.
Description: This report addresses a method for the approximate calculation of compressible flows about profiles with local regions of supersonic velocity. The flow around a slender profile is treated as an example.
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Calculation of the Pressure Distribution on Bodies of Revolution in the Subsonic Flow of a Gas, Part 1, Axially Symmetrical Flow

Calculation of the Pressure Distribution on Bodies of Revolution in the Subsonic Flow of a Gas, Part 1, Axially Symmetrical Flow

Date: July 1, 1947
Creator: Bilharz, Herbert & Hoelder, Ernst
Description: The present report concerns a method of computing the velocity and pressure distributions on bodies of revolution in axially symmetrical flow in the subsonic range. The differential equation for the velocity potential Phi of a compressible fluid motion is linearized tn the conventional manner, and then put in the form Delta(Phi) = 0 by affine transformation. The quantity Phi represents the velocity potential of a fictitious incompressible flow, for which a constant superposition of sources by sections is secured by a method patterned after von Karman which must comply with the boundary condition delta(phi)/delta(n) = 0 at the originally specified contour. This requirement yields for the "pseudo-stream function" psi a differential equation which must be fulfilled for as many points on the contour as source lengths are assumed. In this manner, the problem of defining the still unknown source intensities is reduced to the solution of an inhomogeneous equation system. The pressure distribution is then determined with the aid of Bernoulli's equation and adiabatic equation of state. Lastly, the pressure distributions in compressible and incompressible medium are compared on a model problem.
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Calculations and Experimental Investigations on the Feed-Power Requirement of Airplanes with Boundary-Layer Control

Calculations and Experimental Investigations on the Feed-Power Requirement of Airplanes with Boundary-Layer Control

Date: September 1, 1947
Creator: Krueger, W.
Description: Calculations and test results are given about the feed-power requirement of airplanes with boundary-layer control. Curves and formulas for the rough estimate of pressure-loss and feed-power requirement are set up for the investigated arrangements which differ structurally and aerodynamically. According to these results the feed power for three different designs is calculated at the end of the report.
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Calibration and Measurement in Turbulence Research by the Hot-Wire Method

Calibration and Measurement in Turbulence Research by the Hot-Wire Method

Date: June 1, 1947
Creator: Kovasznay, Kaszlo
Description: The problem of turbulence in aerodynamics is at present being attacked both theoretically and experimentally. In view of the fact however that purely theoretical considerations have not thus far led to satisfactory results the experimental treatment of the problem is of great importance. Among the different measuring procedures the hot wire methods are so far recognized as the most suitable for investigating the turbulence structure. The several disadvantages of these methods however, in particular those arising from the temperature lag of the wire can greatly impair the measurements and may easily render questionable the entire value of the experiment. The name turbulence is applied to that flow condition in which at any point of the stream the magnitude and direction of the velocity fluctuate arbitrarily about a well definable mean value. This fluctuation imparts a certain whirling characteristic to the flow.
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Coefficient of Friction, Oil Flow and Heat Balance of a Full-Journal Bearing

Coefficient of Friction, Oil Flow and Heat Balance of a Full-Journal Bearing

Date: October 1, 1947
Creator: Orloff, P. I.
Description: None
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The Combination of Internal-Combustion Engine and Gas Turbine

The Combination of Internal-Combustion Engine and Gas Turbine

Date: April 1, 1947
Creator: Zinner, K.
Description: While the gas turbine by itself has been applied in particular cases for power generation and is in a state of promising development in this field, it has already met with considerable success in two cases when used as an exhaust turbine in connection with a centrifugal compressor, namely, in the supercharging of combustion engines and in the Velox process, which is of particular application for furnaces. In the present paper the most important possibilities of combining a combustion engine with a gas turbine are considered. These "combination engines " are compared with the simple gas turbine on whose state of development a brief review will first be given. The critical evaluation of the possibilities of development and fields of application of the various combustion engine systems, wherever it is not clearly expressed in the publications referred to, represents the opinion of the author. The state of development of the internal-combustion engine is in its main features generally known. It is used predominantly at the present time for the propulsion of aircraft and road vehicles and, except for certain restrictions due to war conditions, has been used to an increasing extent in ships and rail cars and in some fields ...
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Compression Shocks of Detached Flow

Compression Shocks of Detached Flow

Date: June 1, 1947
Creator: Eggink
Description: It is known that compression shocks which lead from supersonic to subsonic velocity cause the flow to separate on impact on a rigid wall. Such shocks appear at bodies with circular symmetry or wing profiles on locally exceeding sonic velocity, and in Laval nozzles with too high a back pressure. The form of the compression shocks observed therein is investigated.
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Concerning the Velocity of Evaporation of Small Droplets in a Gas Atmosphere

Concerning the Velocity of Evaporation of Small Droplets in a Gas Atmosphere

Date: August 1, 1947
Creator: Fuchs, N.
Description: The evaporation velocity of liquid droplets under various conditions is theoretically calculated and a number of factors are investigated which are neglected in carrying out the fundamental equation of Maxwell. It is shown that the effect of these factors at the small drop sizes and the small weight concentrations ordinarily occurring in fog can be calculated by simple corrections. The evaporation process can be regarded as quasi-stationary in most cases. The question at hand, and also the equivalent question of the velocity of growth of droplets in a supersaturated atmosphere, is highly significant in meteorology and for certain industrial purposes. Since the literature concerning this is very insufficient and many important aspects either are not considered at all or are reported incorrectly, it seems that a short discussion is not superfluous. A special consideration will be given to the various assumptions and neglections that are necessary in deriving the fundamental equation of Maxwell. The experimental work available, which is very insufficient and in part poorly dependable, can be used as an accurate check on the theory only in very few cases.
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Cones in Supersonic Flow

Cones in Supersonic Flow

Date: August 1, 1947
Creator: Hantzsche, W. & Wendt, H.
Description: In the case of cones in axially symmetric flow of supersonic velocity, adiabatic compression takes place between shock wave and surface of the cone. Interpolation curves betwen shock polars and the surface are therefore necessary for the complete understanding of this type of flow. They are given in the present report by graphical-numerical integration of the differential equation for all cone angles and airspeeds.
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