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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1940-1949
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Reports
 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
Recommendations for numerical solution of reinforced-panel and fuselage-ring problems

Recommendations for numerical solution of reinforced-panel and fuselage-ring problems

Date: January 1, 1949
Creator: Hoff, N J & Libby, Paul A
Description: Procedures are recommended for solving the equations of equilibrium of reinforced panels and isolated fuselage rings as represented by the external loads and the operations table established according to Southwell's method. From the solution of these equations the stress distribution can be easily determined. The method of systematic relaxations, the matrix-calculus method, and several other methods applicable in special cases are discussed. Definite recommendations are made for obtaining the solution of reinforced-panel problems which are generally designated as shear lag problems. The procedures recommended are demonstrated in the analysis of a number of panels. In the case of fuselage rings it is not possible to make definite recommendations for the solution of the equilibrium equations for all rings and loadings. However, suggestions based on the latest experience are made and demonstrated on several rings.
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Plastic buckling of a rectangular plate under edge thrusts

Plastic buckling of a rectangular plate under edge thrusts

Date: January 1, 1949
Creator: Handelman, G H & Prager, W
Description: The fundamental equations for the plastic buckling of a rectangular plate under edge thrusts are developed on the basis of a new set of stress-strain relations for the behavior of a metal in the plastic range. These relations are derived for buckling from a state of uniform compression. The fundamental equation for the buckling of a simply compressed plate together with typical boundary conditions is then developed and the results are applied to calculating the buckling loads of a thin strip, a simply supported plate, and a cruciform section. Comparisons with the theories of Timoshenko and Ilyushin are made. Finally, an energy method is given which can be used for finding approximate values of the critical load.
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Investigations of effects of surface temperature and single roughness elements on boundary-layer transition

Investigations of effects of surface temperature and single roughness elements on boundary-layer transition

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Liepmann, Hans W & Fila, Gertrude H
Description: The laminar boundary layer and the position of the transition point were investigated on a heated flat plate. It was found that the Reynolds number of transition decreased as the temperature of the plate is increased. It is shown from simple qualitative analytical considerations that the effect of variable viscosity in the boundary layer due to the temperature difference produces a velocity profile with an inflection point if the wall temperature is higher than the free-stream temperature. This profile is confirmed by measurements. The instability of inflection-point profiles is discussed. Studies of the flow in the wake of large, two-dimensional roughness elements are presented. It is shown that a boundary-layer can separate and reattach itself to the wall without having transition take place.
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The effect of increased cooling surface on performance of aircraft-engine cylinders as shown by tests of the NACA cylinder

The effect of increased cooling surface on performance of aircraft-engine cylinders as shown by tests of the NACA cylinder

Date: January 1, 1944
Creator: Schey, Oscar W; Rollin, Verne G & Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr
Description: A method of constructing fins of nearly optimum proportions has been developed by the NACA to the point where a cylinder has been manufactured and tested. Data were obtained on cylinder temperature for a wide range of inlet-manifold pressures, engine speeds, and cooling-pressure differences.
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Calculations of economy of 18-cylinder radial aircraft engine with exhaust-gas turbine geared to the crankshaft

Calculations of economy of 18-cylinder radial aircraft engine with exhaust-gas turbine geared to the crankshaft

Date: January 1, 1945
Creator: Hannum, Richard W & Zimmerman, Richard H
Description: Calculations based on dynamometer test-stand data obtained on an 18-cylinder radial engine were made to determine the improvement in fuel consumption that can be obtained at various altitudes by gearing an exhaust-gas turbine to the engine crankshaft in order to increase the engine-shaft work.
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Determination of stresses in gas-turbine disks subjected to plastic flow and creep

Determination of stresses in gas-turbine disks subjected to plastic flow and creep

Date: January 1, 1948
Creator: Millenson, M B & Manson, S S
Description: A finite-difference method previously presented for computing elastic stresses in rotating disks is extended to include the computation of the disk stresses when plastic flow and creep are considered. A finite-difference method is employed to eliminate numerical integration and to permit nontechnical personnel to make the calculations with a minimum of engineering supervision. Illustrative examples are included to facilitate explanation of the procedure by carrying out the computations on a typical gas-turbine disk through a complete running cycle. The results of the numerical examples presented indicate that plastic flow markedly alters the elastic-stress distribution.
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Constant-pressure combustion charts including effects of diluent addition

Constant-pressure combustion charts including effects of diluent addition

Date: January 1, 1949
Creator: Turner, L Richard & Bogart, Donald
Description: Charts are presented for the calculation of (a) the final temperatures and the temperature changes involved in constant-pressure combustion processes of air and in products of combustion of air and hydrocarbon fuels, and (b) the quantity of hydrocarbon fuels required in order to attain a specified combustion temperature when water, alcohol, water-alcohol mixtures, liquid ammonia, liquid carbon dioxide, liquid nitrogen, liquid oxygen, or their mixtures are added to air as diluents or refrigerants. The ideal combustion process and combustion with incomplete heat release from the primary fuel and from combustible diluents are considered. The effect of preheating the mixture of air and diluents and the effect of an initial water-vapor content in the combustion air on the required fuel quantity are also included. The charts are applicable only to processes in which the final mixture is leaner than stoichiometric and at temperatures where dissociation is unimportant. A chart is also included to permit the calculation of the stoichiometric ratio of hydrocarbon fuel to air with diluent addition. The use of the charts is illustrated by numerical examples.
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Determination of elastic stresses in gas-turbine disks

Determination of elastic stresses in gas-turbine disks

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Manson, S S
Description: A method is presented for the calculation of elastic stresses in symmetrical disks typical of those of a high-temperature gas turbine. The method is essentially a finite-difference solution of the equilibrium and compatibility equations for elastic stresses in a symmetrical disk. Account can be taken of point-to-point variations in disk thickness, in temperature, in elastic modulus, in coefficient of thermal expansion, in material density, and in Poisson's ratio. No numerical integration or trial-and-error procedures are involved and the computations can be performed in rapid and routine fashion by nontechnical computers with little engineering supervision. Checks on problems for which exact mathematical solutions are known indicate that the method yields results of high accuracy. Illustrative examples are presented to show the manner of treating solid disks, disks with central holes, and disks constructed either of a single material or two or more welded materials. The effect of shrink fitting is taken into account by a very simple device.
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Effect of centrifugal force on the elastic curve of a vibrating cantilever beam

Effect of centrifugal force on the elastic curve of a vibrating cantilever beam

Date: January 1, 1948
Creator: Simpkinson, Scott H; Eatherton, Laurel J & Millenson, Morton B
Description: A study was made to determine the effect of rotation on the dynamic-stress distribution in vibrating cantilever beams. The results of a mathematical analysis are presented together with experimental results obtained by means of stroboscopic photographs and strain gages. The theoretical analysis was confined to uniform cantilever beams; the experimental work was extended to include a tapered cantilever beam to simulate an aircraft propeller blade. Calculations were made on nondimensional basis for second and third mode vibration; the experiments were conducted on beams of various lengths, materials, and cross sections for second-mode vibration. From this investigation it was concluded that high vibratory-stress positions are unaffected by the addition of centrifugal force. Nonrotating vibration surveys of blades therefore are valuable in predicting high vibratory-stress locations under operating conditions.
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Dislocation theory of the fatigue of metals

Dislocation theory of the fatigue of metals

Date: January 1, 1949
Creator: Machlin, E S
Description: A dislocation theory of fatigue failure for annealed solid solutions is presented. On the basis of this theory, an equation giving the dependence of the number of cycles for failure on the stress, the temperature, the material parameters, and the frequency is derived for uniformly stressed specimens. The equation is in quantitative agreement with the data. Inasmuch as one material parameter is indicated to be temperature-dependent and its temperature dependence is unknown, it is impossible to predict the temperature dependence of the number of cycles for failure. A predicted quantitative correlation between fatigue and creep was found to exist, which suggests the practical possibility of obtaining fatigue data for annealed solid solutions and elements from steady-state creep-rate data for these materials. As a result of this investigation, a modification of the equation for the steady-state creep rate previously developed on the basis of the dislocation theory is suggested. Additional data are required to verify completely the dislocation theory of fatigue.
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Correlation of cylinder-head temperatures and coolant heat rejections of a multicylinder, liquid-cooled engine of 1710-cubic-inch displacement

Correlation of cylinder-head temperatures and coolant heat rejections of a multicylinder, liquid-cooled engine of 1710-cubic-inch displacement

Date: January 1, 1949
Creator: Lundin, Bruce T; Povolny, John H & Chelko, Louis J
Description: Data obtained from an extensive investigation of the cooling characteristics of four multicylinder, liquid-cooled engines have been analyzed and a correlation of both the cylinder-head temperatures and the coolant heat rejections with the primary engine and coolant variables was obtained. The method of correlation was previously developed by the NACA from an analysis of the cooling processes involved in a liquid-cooled-engine cylinder and is based on the theory of nonboiling, forced-convection heat transfer. The data correlated included engine power outputs from 275 to 1860 brake horsepower; coolant flows from 50 to 320 gallons per minute; coolants varying in composition from 100 percent water to 97 percent ethylene glycol and 3 percent water; and ranges of engine speed, manifold pressure, carburetor-air temperature, fuel-air ratio, exhaust-gas pressure, ignition timing, and coolant temperature. The effect on engine cooling of scale formation on the coolant passages of the engine and of boiling of the coolant under various operating conditions is also discussed.
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Correlation of exhaust-valve temperatures with engine operating conditions and valve design in an air-cooled cylinder

Correlation of exhaust-valve temperatures with engine operating conditions and valve design in an air-cooled cylinder

Date: January 1, 1945
Creator: Zipkin, M A & Sanders, J C
Description: A semiempirical equation correlating exhaust-valve temperatures with engine operating conditions and exhaust-valve design has been developed. The correlation is based on the theory correlating engine and cooling variables developed in a previous NACA report. In addition to the parameters ordinarily used in the correlating equation, a term is included in the equation that is a measure of the resistance of the complex heat-flow paths between the crown of the exhaust valve and a point on the outside surface of the cylinder head. A means for comparing exhaust valves of different designs with respect to cooling is consequently provided. The necessary empirical constants included in the equation were determined from engine investigations of a large air-cooled cylinder. Tests of several valve designs showed that the calculated and experimentally determined exhaust-valve temperatures were in good agreement.
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Effect of combustor-inlet conditions on performance of an annular turbojet combustor

Effect of combustor-inlet conditions on performance of an annular turbojet combustor

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Childs, J Howard; Mccafferty, Richard J & Surine, Oakley W
Description: The combustion performance, and particularly the phenomenon of altitude operational limits, was studied by operating the annular combustor of a turbojet engine over a range of conditions of air flow, inlet pressure, inlet temperature, and fuel flow. Information was obtained on the combustion efficiencies, the effect on combustion of inlet variables, the altitude operational limits with two different fuels, the pressure losses in the combustor, the temperature and velocity profiles at the combustor outlet, the extent of afterburning, the fuel-injection characteristics, and the condition of the combustor basket.
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Effects of temperature distribution and elastic properties of materials on gas-turbine-disk stresses

Effects of temperature distribution and elastic properties of materials on gas-turbine-disk stresses

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Holms, Arthur G & Faldetta, Richard D
Description: Calculations were made to determine the influence of changes in temperature distribution and in elastic material properties on calculated elastic stresses for a typical gas-turbine disk. Severe temperature gradients caused thermal stresses of sufficient magnitude to reduce the operating safety of the disk. Small temperature gradients were found to be desirable because they produced thermal stresses that subtracted from the centrifugal stresses in the region of the rim. The thermal gradients produced a tendency for a severe stress condition to exist near the rim but this stress condition could be shifted away from the region of blade attachment by altering the temperature distribution. The investigation of elastic material properties showed that centrifugal stresses are slightly affected by changes in modulus of elasticity, but that thermal stresses are approximately proportional to modulus of elasticity and to coefficient of thermal expansion.
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Design and performance of family of diffusing scrolls with mixed-flow impeller and vaneless diffuser

Design and performance of family of diffusing scrolls with mixed-flow impeller and vaneless diffuser

Date: January 1, 1949
Creator: Brown, W Byron & Bradshaw, Guy R
Description: A family of diffusing scrolls was designed for use with a mixed-flow impeller and a small-diameter vaneless diffuser. The design theory, intended to maintain a uniform pressure around the scroll inlet, permits determination of the position of scroll cross sections of preassigned area by considering the radial variation in fluid density and the effects of friction along the scroll. Inasmuch as the design method leaves the cross-sectional shape undetermined, the effect of certain variations in scroll shape was investigated by studying scrolls having angles of divergence (of the scroll walls downstream of the entrance section) of 24 degrees, 40 degrees, and 80 degrees. A second 80 degree scroll was of asymmetrical construction and a third was plaster-cast instead of sand-cast. Each scroll was tested as a compressor component at actual impeller tip speeds of 700 to 1300 feet per second from full throttle to surge.
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Compressibility and heating effects on pressure loss and cooling of a baffled cylinder barrel

Compressibility and heating effects on pressure loss and cooling of a baffled cylinder barrel

Date: January 1, 1944
Creator: Goldstein, Arthur W & Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr
Description: Theoretical investigations have shown that, because air is compressible, the pressure-drop requirements for cooling an air-cooled engine will be much greater at high altitudes and high speeds than at sea level and low speeds. Tests were conducted by the NACA to obtain some experimental confirmation of the effect of air compressibility on cooling and pressure loss of a baffled cylinder barrel and to evaluate various methods of analysis. The results reported in the present paper are regarded as preliminary to tests on single-cylinder and multicylinder engines. Tests were conducted over a wide range of air flows and density altitudes.
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Compressibility and Heating Effects on Pressure Loss and Cooling of a Baffled Cylinder Barrel

Compressibility and Heating Effects on Pressure Loss and Cooling of a Baffled Cylinder Barrel

Date: January 1, 1944
Creator: Goldstein, Arthur W. & Ellerbrock, Herman H., Jr.
Description: Theoretical investigations have shown that, because air is compressible, the pressure-drop requirements for cooling an air-cooled engine will be much greater at high altitudes and high speeds than at sea level and low speeds. Tests were conducted by the NACA to obtain some experimental confirmation of the effect of air compressibility on cooling and pressure loss of a baffled cylinder barrel and to evaluate various methods of analysis. The results reported in the present paper are regarded as preliminary to tests on single-cylinder and multi-cylinder engines. Tests were conducted over a wide range of air flows and density altitudes.
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Comparison of several methods of predicting the pressure loss at altitude across a baffled aircraft-engine cylinder

Comparison of several methods of predicting the pressure loss at altitude across a baffled aircraft-engine cylinder

Date: January 1, 1946
Creator: Neustein, Joseph & Schafer, Louis J , Jr
Description: Several methods of predicting the compressible-flow pressure loss across a baffled aircraft-engine cylinder were analytically related and were experimentally investigated on a typical air-cooled aircraft-engine cylinder. Tests with and without heat transfer covered a wide range of cooling-air flows and simulated altitudes from sea level to 40,000 feet. Both the analysis and the test results showed that the method based on the density determined by the static pressure and the stagnation temperature at the baffle exit gave results comparable with those obtained from methods derived by one-dimensional-flow theory. The method based on a characteristic Mach number, although related analytically to one-dimensional-flow theory, was found impractical in the present tests because of the difficulty encountered in defining the proper characteristic state of the cooling air. Accurate predictions of altitude pressure loss can apparently be made by these methods, provided that they are based on the results of sea-level tests with heat transfer.
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Tests of the NACA 0025 and 0035 airfoils in the full-scale wind tunnel

Tests of the NACA 0025 and 0035 airfoils in the full-scale wind tunnel

Date: January 1, 1941
Creator: Bullivant, W Kenneth
Description: This report presents the results of an investigation conducted in the NACA full-scale wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the 6 by 36-foot rectangular NACA 0025 and 0035 airfoils. The aerodynamic characteristics of the plain airfoils with rounded and square tips were determined by force tests through a complete angle-of-attack range, in addition, the profile drag was determined by the momentum method. The transition points on the airfoils were located by boundary-layer determinations with small total-head and static tubes. Each airfoil was also tested with a 0.20c full-span split flap. Tuft surveys were included to show the progressive breakdown of flow with increasing angles of attack. Previously published data from tests of the NACA 0009, 0012, and 0018 airfoils in the full-scale tunnel have been included in the summary curves.
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Wind-tunnel investigation of NACA 23012, 23021, and 23030 airfoils equipped with 40-percent-chord double slotted flaps

Wind-tunnel investigation of NACA 23012, 23021, and 23030 airfoils equipped with 40-percent-chord double slotted flaps

Date: January 1, 1941
Creator: Harris, Thomas A & Recant, Isidore G
Description: Report presents the results of an investigation conducted in the NACA 7 by 10-foot win tunnel to determine the effect of the deflection of main and auxiliary slotted flaps on the aerodynamic section characteristics of large-chord NACA 23012, 23021, 23030 airfoils equipped with 40-percent-chord double slotted flaps. The complete aerodynamic section characteristics and envelope polar curves are given for each airfoil-flap combination. The effect of airfoil thickness is shown, and comparisons are made of single slotted flaps with double slotted flaps on each of the airfoils.
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Wing plan forms for high-speed flight

Wing plan forms for high-speed flight

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Jones, Robert J
Description: It is pointed out that, in the case of an airfoil of infinite aspect ratio moving at an angle of sideslip, the pressure distribution is determined solely by that component of the motion in a direction normal to the leading edge. It follows that the attachment of plane waves to the airfoil at near-sonic or supersonic speeds (Ackeret theory) may be avoided and the pressure drag may be reduced by the use of plan forms in which the angle of sweepback is greater than the Mach angle. The analysis indicates that for aerodynamic efficiency, wings designed for flight at supersonic speeds should be swept back at an angle greater than the Mach angle, and the angle of sweepback should be such that the component of velocity normal to the leading edge is less than the critical speed of the airfoil sections. This principle may also be applied to wings designed for subsonic speeds near the speed of sound, for which the induced velocities resulting from the thickness might otherwise be sufficiently great to cause shock waves.
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Wind-tunnel investigation of spoiler, deflector, and slot lateral-control devices on wings with full-span split and slotted flaps

Wind-tunnel investigation of spoiler, deflector, and slot lateral-control devices on wings with full-span split and slotted flaps

Date: January 1, 1941
Creator: Wenzinger, Carl J & Rogallo, Francis M
Description: Report presents the results of an extensive investigation made in the NACA 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel of spoiler, deflector, and slot types of lateral-control device on wings with full-span split and slotted flaps. The static rolling and yawing moments were determined for all the devices tested, and the static hinge moments and the time response were determined for a few devices of each type.
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Restraint Provided a Flat Rectangular Plate by a Sturdy Stiffener Along an Edge of the Plate

Restraint Provided a Flat Rectangular Plate by a Sturdy Stiffener Along an Edge of the Plate

Date: January 1, 1942
Creator: Lundquist, Eugene E & Stowell, Elbridge Z.
Description: A sturdy stiffener is defined as a stiffener of such proportions that it does not suffer cross-sectional distortion when moments are applied to some part of the cross section. When such a stiffener is attached to one edge of a plate, it will resist rotation of that edge of the plate by means of its torsional properties. A formula is given for the restraint coefficient provided the plate by such a stiffener. This coefficient is required for the calculation of the critical compressive stress of the plate.
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On the Flow of a Compressible Fluid by the Hodograph Method. II - Fundamental Set of Particular Flow Solutions of the Chaplygin Differential Equation

On the Flow of a Compressible Fluid by the Hodograph Method. II - Fundamental Set of Particular Flow Solutions of the Chaplygin Differential Equation

Date: January 1, 1944
Creator: Garrick, I. E. & Kaplan, Carl
Description: The differential equation of Chaplygin's jet problem is utilized to give a systematic development of particular solutions of the hodograph flow equations, which extends the treatment of Chaplygin into the supersonic range and completes the set of particular solutions. The particular solutions serve to place on a reasonable basis the use of velocity correction formulas for the comparison of incompressible and compressible flows. It is shown that the geometric-mean type of velocity correction formula introduced in part I has significance as an over-all type of approximation in the subsonic range. A brief review of general conditions limiting the potential flow of an adiabatic compressible fluid is given and application is made to the particular solutions, yielding conditions for the existence of singular loci in the supersonic range. The combining of particular solutions in accordance with prescribed boundary flow conditions is not treated in the present paper.
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