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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Reports
 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
The Lagrangian Multiplier Method of Finding Upper and Lower Limits to Critical Stresses of Clamped Plates
The theory of Lagrangian multipliers is applied to the problem of finding both upper and lower limits to the true compressive buckling stress of a clamped rectangular plate. The upper and lower limits thus bracket the truss, which cannot be exactly found by the differential-equation approach. The procedure for obtaining the upper limit, which is believed to be new, presents certain advantages over the classical Raleigh-Rite method of finding upper limits. The theory of the lower-limit procedure has been given by Trefftz but, in the present application, the method differs from that of Trefftz in a way that makes it inherently more quickly convergent. It is expected that in other buckling problems and in some vibration problems problems the Lagrangian multiplier method finding upper and lower limits may be advantageously applied to the calculation of buckling stresses and natural frequencies. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279603/
Lifting-surface-theory aspect-ratio corrections to the lift and hinge-moment parameters for full-span elevators on horizontal tail surfaces
A limited number of lifting-surface-theory solutions for wings with chordwise loadings resulting from angle of attack, parabolic-ac camber, and flap deflection are now available. These solutions were studied with the purpose of determining methods of extrapolating the results in such a way that they could be used to determine lifting-surface-theory values of the aspect-ratio corrections to the lift and hinge-moment parameters for both angle-of-attack and flap-deflection-type loading that could be used to predict the characteristics of horizontal tail surfaces from section data with sufficient accuracy for engineering purposes. Such a method was devised for horizontal tail surfaces with full-span elevators. In spite of the fact that the theory involved is rather complex, the method is simple to apply and may be applied without any knowledge of lifting-surface theory. A comparison of experimental finite-span and section value and of the estimated values of the lift and hinge-moment parameters for three horizontal tail surfaces was made to provide an experimental verification of the method suggested. (author). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279678/
Icing-protection requirements for reciprocating-engine induction systems
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279668/
An Introduction to the Laws of Air Resistance of Aerofoils
Report presents methods of calculating air resistance of airfoils under certain conditions of flow phenomena around the airfoil. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277411/
Comparison of High-Speed Operating Characteristics of Size 215 Cylindrical-Roller Bearings as Determined in Turbojet Engine and in Laboratory Test Rig
A comparison of the operating characteristics of 75-millimeter-bore (size 215) cylindrical-roller one-piece inner-race-riding cage-type bearings was made by means of a laboratory test rig and a turbojet engine. Cooling correlation parameters were determined by means of dimensional analysis, and the generalized results for both the inner- and the outer-race bearing operating temperatures are computed for the laboratory test rig and the turbojet engine. A method is given that enables the designer to predict the inner- and outer-race turbine roller-bearing temperatures from single curves, regardless of variations in speed, load, oil flow, oil inlet temperature, oil inlet viscosity, oil-jet diameter, or any combination of these parameters. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277492/
Ice prevention on aircraft by means of engine exhaust heat and a technical study of heat transmission from a Clark y airfoil
This investigation was conducted to study the practicability of employing heat as a means of preventing the formation of ice on airplane wings. The report relates essentially to technical problems regarding the extraction of heat from the exhaust gases and its proper distribution over the exposed surfaces. In this connection a separate study has been made to determine the variation of the coefficient of heat transmission along the chord of a Clark Y airfoil. Experiments on ice prevention both in the laboratory and in flight show conclusively that it is necessary to heat only the front portion of the wing surface to effect complete prevention. Experiments in flight show that a vapor-heating system which extracts heat from the exhaust and distributes it to the wings is an entirely practical and efficient method for preventing ice formation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277467/
An investigation of the drag of windshields in the 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel
Report presents the results of tests made to determine the drag of closed-cockpit and transport-type windshields. The tests were made at speeds corresponding to a Mach number range of approximately 0.25 to 0.58 in the NACA 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel. This speed range corresponds to a test Reynolds number range of 2,510,000 to 4,830,000 based on the mean aerodynamic chord of the full-span model (17.29 in.). The shapes of the windshield proper, the hood, and the tail fairing were systematically varied to include common types and refined design. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59985/
On the use of residue theory for treating the subsonic flow of a compressible fluid
A new mathematical technique, due to Milne-Thomson, is used to obtain an improved form of the method of Poggi for calculating the effect of compressibility on the subsonic flow past an obstacle. By means of this new method, the difficult surface integrals of the original Poggi method can be replaced by line integrals. These line integrals are then solved by the use of residue theory. In this way an equation is obtained giving the second-order effect of compressibility on the velocity of the fluid. The method is practicable for obtaining the higher-order effects of compressibility on the velocity field. As an illustration of the general result, the flow past an elliptic cylinder is discussed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59982/
A study by high-speed photography of combustion and knock in a spark-ignition engine
The study of combustion in a spark-ignition engine given in Technical Report no. 704 has been continued. The investigation was made with the NACA high-speed motion-picture camera and the NACA optical engine indicator. The camera operates at the rate of 40,000 photographs a second and makes possible the study of phenomena occurring in time intervals as short as 0.000025 second. Photographs are presented of combustion without knock and with both light and heavy knocks, the end zone of combustion being within the field of view. Time-pressure records covering the same conditions as the photographs are presented and their relations to the photographs are studied. Photographs with ignition at various advance angles are compared with a view to observing any possible relationship between pressure and flame depth. A tentative explanation of knock is suggested, which is designed to agree with the indications of the high-speed photographs and the time-pressure records. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59981/
Determination of optimum plan forms for control surfaces
Solutions found for a range of airfoil plan forms indicate that, regardless of the characteristics of the tail surface, the chord of the rudder or of the elevator should be very nearly constant over its span. The optimum ailerons are also of a characteristic shape, varying little with the plan form of the wing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59987/
Pressure distribution over an NACA 23012 airfoil with a fixed slot and a slotted flap
Report presents the results of a pressure-distribution investigation conducted in the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel to determine the air loads on an NACA 23012 airfoil in combination with a fixed leading-edge slot and a slotted flap. Pressures were measured over the upper and lower surfaces of the component parts of the combination for several angles of attack and at several flap settings. The data, presented as pressure diagrams and graphs of section coefficients, are applicable to rib, slat, and flap designs for the combination. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59988/
Critical Compressive Stress for Outstanding Flanges
A chart is presented for the values of the coefficient in the formula for the critical compressive stress at which buckling may be expected to occur in outstanding flanges. These flanges are flat rectangular plates supported along the loaded edges, supported and elastically restrained along one unloaded edge, and free along the other unloaded edge. The mathematical derivations of the formulas required for construction of the chart are given. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59989/
Test of single-stage axial-flow fan
A single-stage axial fan was built and tested in the shop of the propeller-research tunnel of the NACA. The fan comprised a simple 24-blade rotor having a diameter of 21 inches and a solidity of 0.86 and a set of 37 contravanes having a solidity of 1.33. The rotor was driven by a 25-horsepower motor capable of rotating at a speed of 3600 r.p.m. The fan was tested for volume, pressure, and efficiency over a range of delivery pressures and volumes for a wide range of contravane and blade-angle settings. The test results are presented in chart form in terms of nondimensional units in order that similar fans may be accurately designed with a minimum effort. The maximum efficiency (88 percent) was obtained by the fan at a blade angle of 30 degrees and a contravane angle of 70 degrees. An efficiency of 80 percent was obtained by the fan with the contravanes removed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59983/
Effect of body nose shape on the propulsive efficiency of a propeller
Report presents the results of an investigation of the propulsive efficiency of three adjustable propellers of 10-foot diameter operated in front of four body nose shapes, varying from streamline nose that continued through the propeller plane in the form of a large spinner to a conventional open-nose radial-engine cowling. One propeller had airfoil sections close to the hub, the second had conventional round blade shanks, and the third differed from the second only in pitch distribution. The blade-angle settings ranged from 20 degrees to 55 degrees at the 0.75 radius. The effect of the body nose shape on propulsive efficiency may be divided into two parts: (1) the change in the body drag due to the propeller slipstream and (2) the change in propeller load distribution due to the change in velocity caused by the body. For the nose shape tested in the report, the first effect is shown to be very small; therefore, the chief emphasis of the report is confined to the second effect. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59975/
Wind-tunnel investigation of NACA 23012, 23021, and 23030 airfoils equipped with 40-percent-chord double slotted flaps
Report presents the results of an investigation conducted in the NACA 7 by 10-foot win tunnel to determine the effect of the deflection of main and auxiliary slotted flaps on the aerodynamic section characteristics of large-chord NACA 23012, 23021, 23030 airfoils equipped with 40-percent-chord double slotted flaps. The complete aerodynamic section characteristics and envelope polar curves are given for each airfoil-flap combination. The effect of airfoil thickness is shown, and comparisons are made of single slotted flaps with double slotted flaps on each of the airfoils. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59972/
A graphical method of determining pressure distribution in two-dimensional flow
By a generalization of the Joukowski method, a procedure is developed for effecting localized modifications of airfoil shapes and for determining graphically the resultant changes in the pressure distribution. The application of the procedure to the determination of the pressure distribution over airfoils of original design is demonstrated. Formulas for the lift, the moment, and the aerodynamic center are also given. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59971/
Determination of control-surface characteristics from NACA plain-flap and tab data
The data from previous NACA pressure-distribution investigations of plain flaps and tabs with sealed gaps have been analyzed and are presented in this paper in a form readily applicable to the problems of control-surface design. The experimentally determined variation of aerodynamic parameters with flap chord and tab chord are given in chart form and comparisons are made with the theory. With the aid of these charts and the theoretical relationships for a thin airfoil, the aerodynamic characteristics for control surfaces of any plan form with plain flaps and tabs with sealed gaps may be determined. A discussion of the basic equations of the thin-airfoil theory and the development of a number of additional equations that will be helpful in tail design are presented in the appendixes. The procedure for applying the data is described and a sample problem of horizontal tail design is included. The data presented and the method of application set forth in this report should provide a reasonably accurate and satisfactory means of computing the aerodynamic characteristics of control surfaces. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59970/
The design of fins for air-cooled cylinders
An analysis was made to determine the proportions of fins made of aluminum, copper, magnesium, and steel necessary to dissipate maximum quantities of heat for different fin widths, fin weights, and air-flow conditions. The analysis also concerns the determination of the optimum fin proportions when specified limits are placed on the fin dimensions. The calculation of the heat flow in the fins is based on experimentally verified, theoretical equations. The surface heat-transfer coefficients used with this equation were taken from previously reported experiments. In addition to the presentation of fin-design information, this investigation shows that optimum fin dimensions are inappreciably affected by the differences in air flow that are obtained with different air-flow arrangements or by small changes in the length of the air-flow path. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59976/
Effect of aging on mechanical properties of aluminum-alloy rivets
Curves and tabular data present the results of strength tests made during and after 2 1/2 years of aging on rivets and rivet wire of 3/16-inch nominal diameter. The specimens were of aluminum alloy: 24s, 17s, and a17s of the duralumin type and 53s of the magnesium-silicide type. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59973/
Restraint Provided a Flat Rectangular Plate by a Sturdy Stiffener Along an Edge of the Plate
A sturdy stiffener is defined as a stiffener of such proportions that it does not suffer cross-sectional distortion when moments are applied to some part of the cross section. When such a stiffener is attached to one edge of a plate, it will resist rotation of that edge of the plate by means of its torsional properties. A formula is given for the restraint coefficient provided the plate by such a stiffener. This coefficient is required for the calculation of the critical compressive stress of the plate. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59991/
Critical Compressive Stress for Flat Rectangular Plates Supported Along All Edges and Elastically Restrained Against Rotation along the Unloaded Edges
A chart is presented for the values of the coefficient in the formula for the critical compressive stress at which buckling may be expected to occur in flat rectangular plates supported along all edges and, in addition, elastically restrained against rotation along the unloaded edges. The mathematical derivations of the formulas required in the construction of the chart are given. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59990/
Shear lag in box beams methods of analysis and experimental investigations
The bending stresses in the covers of box beams or wide-flange beams differ appreciably from the stresses predicted by the ordinary bending theory on account of shear deformation of the flanges. The problem of predicting these differences has become known as the shear-lag problem. The first part of this paper deals with methods of shear-lag analysis suitable for practical use. The second part of the paper describes strain-gage tests made by the NACA to verify the theory. Three tests published by other investigators are also analyzed by the proposed method. The third part of the paper gives numerical examples illustrating the methods of analysis. An appendix gives comparisons with other methods, particularly with the method of Ebner and Koller. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59998/
Square plate with clamped edges under normal pressure producing large deflections
A theoretical analysis is given for the stresses and deflections of a square plate with clamped edges under normal pressure producing large deflections. Values of the bending stress and membrane stress at the center of the plate and at the midpoint of the edge are given for center deflections up to 1.9 times the plate thickness. The shape of the deflected surface is given for low pressures and for the highest pressure considered. Convergence of solution is considered and it is estimated that the possible error is less than 2 percent. The results are compared with the only previous approximate analysis known to the author and agrees within 5 percent. They are also shown to compare favorably with the known exact solutions for the long rectangular plate and the circular plate. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59999/
Ground effect on downwash angles and wake location
A theoretical study was made of the reduction in downwash and the upward displacement of the wake in the presence of the ground, and some verification of theory was obtained by means of air-flow measurements made with a ground-board and image-wing combination. Methods are given for estimating the effects and numerous examples are included to illustrate the nature of these effects and to show their order of magnitude. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59996/
Nonstationary flow about a wing-aileron-tab combination including aerodynamic balance
This paper presents a continuation of the work published in Technical Report no. 496. The results of that paper have been extended to include the effect of aerodynamic balance and the effect of a tab added to the aileron. The aerodynamic coefficients are presented in a form convenient for application to the flutter problem. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59993/
Bending of rectangular plates with large deflections
The solution of Von Karman's fundamental equations for large deflections of plates is presented for the case of a simply supported rectangular plate under combined edge compression and lateral loading. Numerical solutions are given for square plates and for rectangular plates with a width-span ratio of 3:1. The effective widths under edge compression are compared with effective widths according to Von Karman, Bengston, Marguerre, and Cox and with experimental results by Ramberg, Mcpherson, and Levy. The deflections of a square plate under lateral pressure are compared with experimental and theoretical results by Kaiser. It is found that the effective widths agree closely with Marguerre's formula and with the experimentally observed values and that the deflections agree with the experimental results and with Kaiser's work. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59995/
The interference between struts in various combinations
This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests made to determine the interference drag arising from various arrangements of streamline struts and round struts, or cylinders. Determinations were made of the interference drag of struts spaced side by side, struts in tandem, tandem struts encased in a single fairing, a strut intersecting a plane, and struts intersecting to form a v. Three sizes of struts were used for most of the tests. These tests show that the interference drag arising from struts in close proximity may be of considerable magnitude, in some instances amounting to more than the drag of the struts themselves. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66125/
Nomenclature for Aeronautics
This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature by the Executive Committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held August 11, 1933. This publication supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66122/
Negative thrust and torque characteristics of an adjustable-pitch metal propeller
This report presents the results of a series of negative thrust and torque measurements made with a 4 foot diameter model of a conventional aluminum-alloy propeller. The tests were made in the 20-foot propeller-research tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The results show that the negative thrust is considerably affected by the shape and size of the body behind the propeller, that the maximum negative thrust increases with decrease in blade-angle setting, and that the drag of a locked propeller may be greatly reduced by feathering it into the wind. Several examples of possible applications of the data are given. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66121/
The NACA tank : a high-speed towing basin for testing models of seaplane floats
This report describes the high-speed model towing basin of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, usually referred to as the NACA Tank. The purpose of this piece of equipment is to enable the Committee to provide information and data regarding the performance of seaplanes on the water analogous to the information furnished concerning the performance of airplanes in the air. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66127/
The NACA high-speed wind tunnel and tests of six propeller sections
This report gives a description of the high-speed wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The operation of the tunnel is also described and the method of presenting the data is given. An account of an investigation of the aerodynamic properties of six propeller sections is included. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66120/
Performance of a fuel-injection spark-ignition engine using a hydrogenated safety fuel
This report presents the performance of a single-cylinder test engine using a hydrogenated safety fuel. The safety fuel has a flash point of 125 degrees f. (Cleveland open-dup method), which is high enough to remove most of the fire hazard, and an octane number of 95, which permits higher compression ratios to be used than are permissible with most undoped gasolines. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66128/
The experimental determination of the moments of inertia of airplanes
The application of the pendulum method to the experimental determination of the moments of inertia of airplanes is discussed in this report. Particular reference is made to the effects of the air, in which the airplane is immersed, on the swinging tests and to the procedure by which these effects are taken into account. This procedure has been used for some time, and the data on several airplanes for which the moments of inertia have been found are included. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66124/
Wind-tunnel tests on combinations of a wing with fixed auxiliary airfoils having various chords and profiles
This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests on various auxiliary airfoils having three different airfoil sections and several different chord lengths in combination with a Clark y model wing in a sufficient number of relative positions to determine the optimum with regard to certain criterions of aerodynamic performance. The airfoil sections included a symmetrical profile, one of medium camber, and a highly cambered one. The chord sizes of the auxiliary airfoils ranged from 7.5 to 25 percent of the chord of the main wing, and the span was equal to that of the main wing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66129/
Increasing the air charge and scavenging the clearance volume of a compression-ignition engine
The object of the investigation presented in this report was to determine the effects of increasing the air charge and scavenging the clearance volume of a 4-stroke-cycle compression-ignition engine having a vertical-disk form combustion chamber. Boosting the inlet-air pressure with normal valve timing increased the indicated engine power in proportion to the additional air inducted and resulted in smoother engine operation with less combustion shock. Scavenging the clearance volume by using a valve overlap of 145 degrees and an inlet-air boost pressure of approximately 2 1/2 inches of mercury produced a net increase in performance for clear exhaust operation of 33 percent over that obtained with normal valve timing and the same boost pressure. The improved combustion characteristics result in lower specific fuel consumption, and a clearer exhaust. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66126/
Determination of the theoretical pressure distribution for twenty airfoils
This report gives the theoretical distribution of pressure at lift coefficients of 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 for 20 airfoils, calculated on the basis of a rigorous potential theory of arbitrary airfoils. It also provides tables from which the characteristics of the airfoils for any angle of attack in 2-dimensional potential flow are readily calculable. The theoretical values of the angles of zero lift, the lift and moment coefficients, and the ideal angles of attack are listed and some comparisons with experiment are indicated. The results presented may be of value in predicting structural loads and also in a correlation of theoretical pressure gradients with profile resistance. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66123/
Mechanism of flutter.a theoretical and experimental investigation of the flutter problem
The results of the basic flutter theory originally devised in 1934 and published as NACA Technical Report no. 496 are presented in a simpler and more complete form convenient for further studies. The paper attempts to facilitate the judgement of flutter problems by a systematic survey of the theoretical effects of the various parameters. A large number of experiments were conducted on cantilever wings, with and without ailerons, in the NACA high-speed wind tunnel for the purpose of verifying the theory and to study its adaptability to three-dimensional problems. The experiments included studies on wing taper ratios, nacelles, attached floats, and external bracings. The essential effects in the transition to the three-dimensional problem have been established. Of particular interest is the existence of specific flutter modes as distinguished from ordinary vibration modes. It is shown that there exists a remarkable agreement between theoretical and experimental results. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66345/
Flame speeds and energy considerations for explosions in a spherical bomb
Simultaneous measurements were made of the speed of flame and the rise in pressure during explosions of mixtures of carbon monoxide, normal heptane, iso-octane, and benzene in a 10-inch spherical bomb with central ignition. From these records, fundamental properties of the explosive mixtures, which are independent of the apparatus, were computed. The transformation velocity, or speed at which flame advances into and transforms the explosive mixture, increases with both the temperature and the pressure of the unburned gas. The rise in pressure was correlated with the mass of charge inflamed to show the course of the energy developed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66342/
The unsteady lift of a wing of finite aspect ratio
Unsteady-lift functions for wings of finite aspect ratio have been calculated by correcting the aerodynamic inertia and the angle of attack of the infinite wing. The calculations are based on the operational method. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66341/
Effect of exit-slot position and opening on the available cooling pressure for NACA nose-slot cowlings
Report presents the results of an investigation of full-scale nose-slot cowlings conducted in the NACA 20-foot wind tunnel to furnish information on the pressure drop available for cooling. Engine conductances from 0 to 0.12 and exit-slot conductances from 0 to 0.30 were covered. Two basic nose shapes were tested to determine the effect of the radius of curvature of the nose contour; the nose shape with the smaller radius of curvature gave the higher pressure drop across the engine. The best axial location of the slot for low-speed operation was found to be in the region of maximum negative pressure for the basic shape for the particular operating condition. The effect of the pressure operating condition on the available cooling pressure is shown. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66347/
The problem of cooling an air-cooled cylinder on an aircraft engine
An analysis of the cooling problem has been to show by what means the cooling of an air-cooled aircraft engine may be improved. Each means of improving cooling is analyzed on the basis of effectiveness in cooling with respect to power for cooling. The altitude problem is analyzed for both supercharged and unsupercharged engines. The case of ground cooling is also discussed. The heat-transfer process from the hot gases to the cylinder wall is discussed on the basis of the fundamentals of heat transfer and thermodynamics. Adiabatic air-temperature rise at a stagnation point in compressible flow is shown to depend only on the velocity of flow. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66380/
An apparatus for measuring rates of discharge of a fuel-injection system
A portable apparatus for rapidly determining rates of discharge of a fuel-injection system is described. Satisfactory operation of this apparatus with injection-pump speeds up to 2400 r.p.m was obtained. Rate-of-discharge tests were made with several cam-plunger-valve injection systems with long injection tubes. A check valve designed to reduce secondary discharges was tested. This check valve was operated with injection-pump speeds up to 2400 r.p.m without the occurrence of large secondary discharges. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66375/
Analysis and prediction of longitudinal stability of airplanes
An analysis has been made of the longitudinal stability characteristics of 15 airplanes as determined in flight. In the correlation of satisfactory and unsatisfactory characteristics with determined values, the derivative that expresses the ratio of static-restoring moments to elevator-control moments was found to represent most nearly the stability characteristics appreciated by the pilots. The analysis was extended to study the effects of various design features on the observed stability characteristics. Design charts and data are included that show the effects on longitudinal stability of relative positions of wing and tail, fuselage size and location, engine nacelles, and horizontal-tail arrangements. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66372/
Preignition characteristics of several fuels under simulated engine conditions
The preignition characteristics of a number of fuels have been studied under conditions similar to those encountered in an engine. These conditions were simulated by suddenly compressing a fuel-air mixture in contact with an electrically heated hot spot in the cylinder head of the NACA combustion apparatus. Schlieren photographs and indicator cards were taken of the burning, and the hot-spot temperatures necessary to cause ignition under various conditions were determined. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66371/
Determination of ground effect from tests of a glider in towed flight
Report presents the results of an investigation made to find the effect of ground on the aerodynamic characteristics of a Franklin PS-2 glider. The lift, the drag, and the angle of attack of the glider in towed flight were determined at several heights from 0.14 to 1.19 span lengths and at various speeds for each height. Two wing arrangements were tested: the plain wing, and the wing with a nearly full-span 30-percent-chord split flap deflected 45 degrees. The experimental results for the plain wing were in good agreement with theoretical values calculated by the method of Wieselsberger for both the angle of attack and the drag coefficient at a height of 0.21 span length; Tani's refinements of the theory had a practically negligible effect on the computed values in this case. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66355/
Effective gust structure at low altitudes as determined from the reactions of an airplane
Measurements of gust structure and gust intensity were made in the lower levels of the atmosphere (0 to 3,500 ft.). An Aeronca C-2 airplane was used as the measuring instrument, the gust structure being derived from the recorded motions of the airplane. Data were also obtained on wind velocities and temperatures as functions of altitude for use in attempting to correlate the gust-structure data with various meteorological quantities. The results indicated little or no correlation between the gust velocity and the gradient distance. The data, however, did indicate that an airplane the size of the Aeronca will respond most frequently to gusts having gradient distance of the order of 30 feet. The maximum true gust velocity measured during the investigation was 25 feet per second. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66352/
Free-spinning wind-tunnel tests of a low-wing monoplane with systematic changes in wings and tails V : effect of airplane relative density
The reported tests are a continuation of an NACA investigation being made in the free-spinning wind tunnel to determine the effects of independent variations in load distribution, wing and tail arrangement, and control disposition on the spin characteristics of airplanes. The standard series of tests was repeated to determine the effect of airplane relative density. Tests were made at values of the relative-density parameter of 6.8, 8.4 (basic), and 12.0; and the results were analyzed. The tested variations in the relative-density parameter may be considered either as variations in the wing loading of an airplane spun at a given altitude, with the radii of gyration kept constant, or as a variation of the altitude at which the spin takes place for a given airplane. The lower values of the relative-density parameter correspond to the lower wing loadings or to the lower altitudes of the spin. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66351/
Wind-tunnel investigation of NACA 23012 airfoil with various arrangements of slotted flaps
An investigation was made in the NACA 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel of a large-chord NACA 23012 airfoil with several arrangements of 25.66 percent chord slotted flaps to determine the section aerodynamic characteristics as affected by slot shape, flap shape, flap location, and flap deflection. The flap position for maximum lift, the polars for arrangements considered favorable for take-off and climb, and the complete section aerodynamic characteristics for selected optimum arrangements were determined. A discussion is given of the relative merits of the various arrangement for certain selected criterions. A comparison is made of a slotted flap on the NACA 23021 airfoil with a corresponding slotted flap previously developed for the NACA 23012 airfoil. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66335/
Cooling on the front of an air-cooled engine cylinder in a conventional engine cowling
Measurements were made of the cooling on the fronts of model cylinders in a conventional cowling for cooling in both the ground and the cruising conditions. The mechanisms of front and rear cooling are essentially different. Cooling on the rear baffled part of the cylinders continually increases with increasing fin width. For the front of the cylinder, an optimum fin width was found to exist beyond which an increase in width reduced the heat transfer. The heat transfer coefficient on the front of the cylinders was larger on the side of the cylinder facing the propeller swirl than on the opposite side. This effect became more pronounced as the fin width was increased. These results are introductory to the study of front cooling and show the general effect of several test parameters. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66332/
Experimental verification of the theory of oscillating airfoils
Measurements have been made of the lift on an airfoil in pitching oscillation with a continuous-recording, instantaneous-force balance. The experimental values for the phase difference between the angle of attack and the lift are shown to be in close agreement with theory. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66331/
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