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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1950-1959
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Notes
 Collection: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
Abnormal grain growth in M-252 and S-816 alloys
An experimental investigation was carried out on air- and vacuum-melted M-252 and S-816 alloys to find conditions of heating and hot-working which resulted in abnormal grain growth. The experiments were mainly limited to normal conditions of heating for hot-working and heat treatment and normal temperatures of solution treatment were used to allow grain growth after susceptibility to abnormal grain growth was developed by various experimental conditions. Results indicated that small reductions of essentially strain-free metal were the basic cause of such grain growth. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57131/
Abnormal grain growth in nickel-base heat-resistant alloys
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57096/
Abnormal grain growth in S-816 alloy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57000/
Accelerations and passenger harness loads measured in full-scale light-airplane crashes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56800/
Accelerations in transport-airplane crashes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56808/
Accuracy of approximate methods for predicting pressures on pointed nonlifting bodies of revolution in supersonic flow
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56461/
The accuracy of the substitute-stringer approach for determining the bending frequencies of multistringer box beams
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57907/
An accurate and rapid method for the design of supersonic nozzles
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57389/
Achievement of continuous wall curvature in design of two-dimensional symmetrical supersonic nozzles
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56184/
Acoustic analysis of ram-jet buzz
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57885/
Acoustic radiation from two-dimensional rectangular cutouts in aerodynamic surfaces
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57843/
Acoustic, thrust, and drag characteristics of several full-scale noise suppressors for turbojet engines
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57452/
Acoustical treatment for the NACA 8- by 6-foot supersonic propulsion wind tunnel
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56258/
Additional static and fatigue tests of high-strength aluminum-alloy bolted joints
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57279/
The aerodynamic behavior of a harmonically oscillating finite sweptback wing in supersonic flow
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55838/
Aerodynamic characteristics and flying qualities of a tailless triangular-wing airplane configuration as obtained from flights of rocket-propelled models at transonic and supersonic speeds
A flight investigation of rocket-powered models of a tailless triangular-wing airplane configuration was made through the transonic and low supersonic speed range at the Langley Pilotless Aircraft Research Station at Wallops Island, Va. An analysis of the aerodynamic coefficients, stability derivatives, and flying qualities based on the results obtained from the successful flight tests of three models is presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56243/
Aerodynamic characteristics at Reynolds numbers of 3.0 x 10(exp 6) and 6.0 x 10(exp 6) of three airfoil sections formed by cutting off various amounts from the rear portion of the NACA 0012 airfoil section
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55451/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a circular cylinder at Mach number 6.86 and angles of attack up to 90 degrees
Pressure-distribution and force tests of a circular cylinder have been made in the Langley 11-inch hypersonic tunnel at a Mach number of 6.88, a Reynolds number of 129,000, and angles of attack up to 90 degrees. The results are compared with the hypersonic approximation of Grimminger, Williams, and Young and a simple modification of the Newtonian flow theory. An evaluation of the crossflow theory is made through comparison of present results with available crossflow Mach number drag coefficients. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56263/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a refined deep-step planing-tail flying-boat hull with various forebody and afterbody shapes
An investigation was made in the Langley 300-mph 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a refined deep-step planing-tail hull with various forebody and afterbody shapes and, for comparison, a streamline body simulating the fuselage of a modern transport airplane. The results of the tests indicated that the configurations incorporating a forebody with a length-beam ratio of 7 had lower minimum drag coefficients than the configurations incorporating a forebody with length-beam ratio of 5. The lowest minimum drag coefficients, which were considerably less than that of a conventional hull and slightly less than that of a streamline body, were obtained on the length-beam-ratio-7 forebody, alone and with round center boom. Drag coefficients and longitudinal- and lateral-stability parameters presented include the interference of a 21-percent-thick support wing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55709/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a small-scale shrouded propeller at angles of attack from 0 to 90 degrees
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57798/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a two-blade NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 propeller and of a two-blade NACA 10-(3)(08)-045 propeller
Characteristics are given for the two-blade NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 propeller and for the two-blade NACA 10-(3)(08)-045 propeller over a range of advance ratio from 0.5 to 3.8, through a blade-angle range from 20 degrees to 55 degrees measured at the 0.75 radius. Maximum efficiencies of the order of 91.5 to 92 percent were obtained for the propellers. The propeller with the thinner airfoil sections over the outboard portion of the blades, the NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 propeller, had lower losses at high tip speeds, the difference amounting to about 5 percent at a helical tip Mach number of 1.10. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56670/
The aerodynamic characteristics of an aspect-ratio-20 wing having thick airfoil sections and employing boundary-layer control by suction
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56745/
Aerodynamic characteristics of damping screens
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55303/
Aerodynamic characteristics of NACA 0012 airfoil section at angles of attack from 0 degrees to 180 degrees
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56017/
Aerodynamic characteristics of several 6-percent-thick airfoils at angles of attack from 0 degrees to 20 degrees at high subsonic speeds
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57708/
Aerodynamic characteristics of the NACA 64-010 and 0010-1.10 40/1.051 airfoil sections at Mach numbers from 0.30 to 0.85 and Reynolds numbers from 4.0 x 10(exp. 6) to 8.0 x 10(exp. 6)
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57121/
Aerodynamic characteristics of three deep-step planing-tail flying-boat hulls and a transverse-step hull with extended afterbody
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56457/
Aerodynamic coefficients for an oscillating airfoil with hinged flap, with tables for a Mach number of 0.7
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55603/
The aerodynamic design and calibration of an asymmetric variable Mach number nozzle with a sliding block for the Mach number range 1.27 to 2.75
A method of designing as asymmetric, fixed geometry, variable Mach number nozzle has been developed by using the method of characteristics. A small nozzle conforming to the analytically determined ordinates was constructed and calibrated over a range of Mach numbers extending from 1.27 to 2.75. The results show the variation in Mach number to be plus or minus 0.01 or less and in the flow direction to be plus or minus 0.2 degrees within the test section. The range of Mach numbers from 1.27 to 2.75 was obtained by translating the lower block in a straight line parallel to the test-section center line for a distance of 2.17 test-section heights. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56660/
The aerodynamic design of high Mach number nozzles utilizing axisymmetric flow with application to a nozzle of square test section
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55915/
The aerodynamic design of supersonic propellers from structural considerations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56519/
Aerodynamic Effects Caused by Icing of an Unswept NACA 65A004 Airfoil
The effects of ice formations on the section lift, drag, and pitching-moment coefficients of an unswept NACA 65A004 airfoil section of 6-foot chord were studied.. The magnitude of the aerodynamic penalties was primarily a function of the shape and size of the ice formation near the leading edge of the airfoil. The exact size and shape of the ice formations were determined photographically and found to be complex functions of the operating and icing conditions. In general, icing of the airfoil at angles of attack less than 40 caused large increases in section drag coefficients (as much as 350 percent in 8 minutes of heavy glaze icing), reductions in section lift coefficients (up to 13 percent), and changes in the pitching-moment coefficient from diving toward climbing moments. At angles of attack greater than 40 the aerodynamic characteristics depended mainly on the ice type. The section drag coefficients generally were reduced by the addition of rime ice (by as much as 45 percent in 8 minutes of icing). In glaze icing, however, the drag increased at these angles of attack. The section lift coefficients were variably affected by rime-ice formations; however, in glaze icing, lift increases at high angles of attack amounted to as much as 9 percent for an icing time of 8 minutes. Pitching-moment-coefficient changes in icing conditions were somewhat erratic and depended on the icing condition. Rotation of the iced airfoil to angles of attack other than that at which icing occurred caused sufficiently large changes in the pitching-moment coefficient that, in flight, rapid corrections in trim might be required in order to avoid a hazardous situation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53428/
The aerodynamic forces and moments on a 1/10-scale model of a fighter airplane in spinning attitudes as measured on a rotary balance in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55576/
Aerodynamic forces, moments, and stability derivatives for slender bodies of general cross section
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53584/
Aerodynamic forces, moments, and stability derivatives for slender bodies of general cross section
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57039/
Aerodynamic interference of slender wing-tail combinations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55977/
Aerodynamic investigation of a four-blade propeller operating through an angle-of-attack range from 0 to 180 degrees
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57540/
Aerodynamic investigation of a parabolic body of revolution at mach number of 1.92 and some effects of an annular supersonic jet exhausting from the base
An aerodynamic investigation of a slender pointed parabolic body of revolution was conducted at Mach number of 1.92 with and without the effects of an annular supersonic jet exhausting from the base. Measurements with the jet inoperative were made of lift, drag, pitching moment, base pressures, and radial and axial pressures. With the jet in operation, pressure measurements were made over the rear of the body with the primary variables being angle of attack, ratio of jet velocity to stream velocity, and ratio of pressure at jet exit to stream pressure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55995/
Aerodynamic loads on a leading-edge flap and a leading-edge slat on the NACA 64A010 airfoil section
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57436/
Aerodynamic mixing downstream from line source of heat in high-intensity sound field
Theory and measurement showed that the heat wake downstream from a line source is displaced by a transverse standing sound wave in a manner similar to a flag waving in a harmonic mode. With a 147 db, 104 cps standing wave, time-mean temperatures were reduced by an order of magnitude except near the displacement-pattern nodal points. The theory showed that a 161 db, 520 cps standing wave considerably increased the mixing in both the time-mean and instantaneous senses. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56335/
Aerodynamics of a rectangular wing of infinite aspect ratio at high angles of attack and supersonic speeds
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57675/
Aerodynamics of slender wings and wing-body combinations having swept trailing edges
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56972/
An air-flow-direction pickup suitable for telemetering use on pilotless aircraft
A vane-type air-flow-direction pickup is described which is suitable for telemetering angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip data from rocket-propelled pilotless aircraft models. Test results which are presented show that the device performs well under high accelerations and is stable throughout a Mach number rage from subsonic to above a Mach number of 2.5. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56053/
Air forces and moments on triangular and related wings with subsonic leading edges oscillating in supersonic potential flow
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55815/
An airborne indicator for measuring vertical velocity of airplanes at wheel contact
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56603/
Airfoil profiles for minimum pressure drag at supersonic velocities : application of shock-expansion theory, including consideration of hypersonic range
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56307/
Airfoil section characteristics at high angles of attack
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57113/
The Ames 10- by 14-inch supersonic wind tunnel
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56915/
Amplitude of supersonic diffuser flow pulsations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57879/
Analogue-computer simulation of an autopilot servo system having nonlinear response characteristics
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55902/
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