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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Decade: 2000-2009
 Year: 2001
 Collection: Environmental Policy Collection
Air Quality Forecasting: A Review of Federal Programs and Research Needs

Air Quality Forecasting: A Review of Federal Programs and Research Needs

Date: June 2001
Creator: National Science and Technology Council (U.S.). Air Quality Research Subcommittee.
Description: This report provides a brief overview of the state of science of air quality forecasting. The report was composed to guide future federal research in air quality forecasting.
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The American Way to the Kyoto Protocol: an Economic Analysis to Reduce Carbon Pollution. A Study for World Wildlife Fund

The American Way to the Kyoto Protocol: an Economic Analysis to Reduce Carbon Pollution. A Study for World Wildlife Fund

Date: July 2001
Creator: Bailie, Alison; Bernow, Stephen; Dougherty, William; Lazarus, Michael & Kartha, Sivan
Description: This report presents a study of policies and measures that could dramatically reduce US greenhouse gas emissions over the next two decades. It examines a broad set of national policies to increase energy efficiency, accelerate the adoption of renewable energy technologies, and shift energy use to less carbon-intensive fuels. The policies address major areas of energy use in residential and commercial buildings, industrial facilities, transportation, and power generation.
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Arctic Flora and Fauna: Status and Conservation

Arctic Flora and Fauna: Status and Conservation

Date: June 11, 2001
Creator: Program for the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF)
Description: What is the overall state of the Arctic environment? The aim of this report is to answer the many aspects of this seemingly straightforward question. Although several national and international efforts have looked at parts of the Arctic, this is the first attempt to assess the state of Arctic flora and fauna as a whole.
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California Legislature, 2001-2002 Session, Senate Bill No. 527

California Legislature, 2001-2002 Session, Senate Bill No. 527

Date: September 2001
Creator: California. Legislature. Senate.
Description: Bill introduced by the California Senate to revise the functions and duties of the California Climate Action Registry and requires the Registry, in coordination with CEC to adopt third-party verification metrics, developing GHG emissions protocols and qualifying third-party organizations to provide technical assistance and certification of emissions baselines and inventories. SB 527 amended SB 1771 to emphasize third-party verification.
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Clean Energy: Jobs for America’s Future

Clean Energy: Jobs for America’s Future

Date: October 2010
Creator: Bailie, Alison; Bernow, Stephen; Dougherty, William; Lazarus, Michael; Kartha, Sivan & Goldberg, Marshall
Description: This study analyzes the employment, macroeconomic, energy and environmental impacts of implementing the Climate Protection Scenario.
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Clouds in the Balance

Clouds in the Balance

Date: October 11, 2001
Creator: Schmidt, Laurie J.
Description: This feature article provides a summary of study about the role of clouds in the balance. Until recently, scientists were uncertain whether clouds had an overall net cooling or heating effect on the Earth's climate. But recent studies show that, in the tropics, a "near cancellation" between shortwave cooling and longwave warming exists, which indicates that the amount of incoming radiant energy is roughly equal to the amount of outgoing radiation. However, small changes in tropical cloudiness can disrupt this precarious balance.
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Coral Bleaching and Marine Protected Areas

Coral Bleaching and Marine Protected Areas

Date: September 2001
Creator: Salm, Rod & Coles, Steve L.
Description: The report convenes a small working group of influential participants with significant experience in relevant coral reef research, monitoring, and marine protected area (MPA) management. Collectively, they embody comprehensive, direct knowledge of all major reef areas worldwide.
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Dust from Africa Leads to Large Toxic Algae Blooms in Gulf of Mexico, Study Finds. [Press release].

Dust from Africa Leads to Large Toxic Algae Blooms in Gulf of Mexico, Study Finds. [Press release].

Date: August 28, 2001
Creator: NASA News
Description: This press release summarizes the findings of a new study. Saharan dust clouds travel thousands of miles and fertilize the water off the West Florida coast with iron, which kicks off blooms of toxic algae. The research was partially funded by a NASA grant as part of ECOHAB: Florida (Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms), a multi-disciplinary research project designed to study harmful algae.
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Environmental Variability and Climate Change

Environmental Variability and Climate Change

Date: 2001
Creator: Past Global Changes (PAGES)
Description: The PAGES research community works toward improving our understanding of the Earth's changing environment. By placing current and future global changes in a long term perspective, they can be assessed relative to natural variability. Since the industrial revolution, the Earth System has become increasingly affected by human activities. Natural and human processes are woven into a complex tapestry of forcings, responses, feedbacks and consequences. Deciphering this complexity is essential as we plan for the future. Paleoenvironmental research is the only way to investigate Earth System processes that operate on timescales longer than the period of instrumental records.
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Global Change and Mountain Regions:  The Mountain Research Initiative

Global Change and Mountain Regions: The Mountain Research Initiative

Date: 2001
Creator: Bekcer, Alfred & Bugmann, Harald
Description: The strong altitudinal gradients in mountain regions provide unique and sometimes the best opportunities to detect and analyse global change processes and phenomena. Meteorological, hydrological, cryospheric and ecological conditions change strongly over relatively short distances; thus biodiversity tends to be high, and characteristic sequences of ecosystems and cryospheric systems are found along mountain slopes. The boundaries between these systems experience shifts due to environmental change and thus may be used as indicators of such changes. The higher parts of many mountain ranges are not affected by direct human activities. These areas include many national parks and other protected environments. They may serve as locations where the environmental impacts of climate change alone, including changes in atmospheric chemistry, can be studied directly. Mountain regions are distributed all over the globe, from the Equator almost to the poles and from oceanic to highly continental climates. This global distribution allows us to perform comparative regional studies and to analyse the regional differentiation of environmental change processes as characterised above. Therefore, within the IGBP an Initiative for Collaborative Research on Global Change and Mountain Regions was developed, which strives to achieve an integrated approach for observing, modelling and investigating global change phenomena and processes ...
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Global Change and the Earth System: A planet under pressure

Global Change and the Earth System: A planet under pressure

Date: 2001
Creator: Global Environmental Change Programmes
Description: The PAGES research community works toward improving our understanding of the Earth's changing environment. By placing current and future global changes in a long term perspective, they can be assessed relative to natural variability. Since the industrial revolution, the Earth System has become increasingly affected by human activities. Natural and human processes are woven into a complex tapestry of forcings, responses, feedbacks and consequences. Deciphering this complexity is essential as we plan for the future. Paleoenvironmental research is the only way to investigate Earth System processes that operate on timescales longer than the period of instrumental records.
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How Will Climate Change Affect the Mid-Atlantic Region?

How Will Climate Change Affect the Mid-Atlantic Region?

Date: June 2001
Creator: United States Environmental Protection Agency, Region 3
Description: Average temperature has risen 1 degree F over the last century in the Mid-Atlantic Region as well as across the globe. Climate science is developing rapidly and many studies project additional warming. Although the future is uncertain and difficult to predict, our best science suggests the following changes are likely. The Mid-Atlantic Region will be somewhat warmer and perhaps wetter, resulting in a wide range of impacts on plants, wildlife, and humans. Human activities that release heat-trapping gases into the atmosphere will continue to accelerate the observed warming trend. Climate change will compound existing stresses from population density and development. The region's overall economy is quite resilient, but impacts will be more severe for some economic activities and localities.
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IHDP Global Carbon Cycle Research: International Carbon Research Framework

IHDP Global Carbon Cycle Research: International Carbon Research Framework

Date: February 2001
Creator: Gupta, Joeeta; Lebel, Louis; Vellinga, Pier & Young, Oran
Description: The degree to which carbon flows balance each other - human activities leading to carbon emissions into the atmosphere, vegetation and oceans soaking it up - is the subject of vigorous debate. It is not yet possible to define quantitatively the global effects of human activities such as forestry and agriculture, and may never be so. However, studies to determine these effects have emerged as critical for understanding how the earth's climate will evolve in the future. Global concern about the potential implications of the behaviour of the carbon cycle under anthropogenic stress includes concepts of system instability and large scale change. To contribute to understanding this behaviour, and our potential responses to it, requires a thorough investigation of both biophysical and social systems. Until recently, most scientific assessments of such risks focused on the anatomy of conceivable environmental changes themselves, devoting little attention to either the human driving forces or the ecosystems and societies that might be endangered by the changes. Recently, however, questions about the linkage and interaction of social, ecological, and biogeochemical systems are emerging as a central focus of policy-driven assessments of global environmental risks. The approach used here is to accept humans as an integral ...
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Intercontinental Transport of Air Pollution: Relationship to North American Air Quality.  A Review of Federal Resarch and Future Needs

Intercontinental Transport of Air Pollution: Relationship to North American Air Quality. A Review of Federal Resarch and Future Needs

Date: April 2001
Creator: National Science and Technology Council (U.S.). Air Quality Research Subcommittee.
Description: This government report describes pollutants which are carried between continents by air currents. The report also addresses current and future research to better understand how these pollutants are transported.
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Law of the People's Republic of China on Desert Prevention and Transformation

Law of the People's Republic of China on Desert Prevention and Transformation

Date: August 31, 2001
Creator: National People's Congress of the People's Republic of China
Description: This Law was formulated in order to prevent desertification, to improve and reclaim desertified land, to protect the environment, and to promote a sustainable economy and society.
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Lessons from PPP2000: Living with Earth's Extremes-Report from the PPP2000 Working Group to the Office of Science and Technology Policy Subcommittee on Natural Disaster Reduction

Lessons from PPP2000: Living with Earth's Extremes-Report from the PPP2000 Working Group to the Office of Science and Technology Policy Subcommittee on Natural Disaster Reduction

Date: September 2001
Creator: Cohn, Timothy A.; Gohn, Kathleen K. & Hooke, William H.
Description: This book is a series of reports summarizing discussions and recommendations from a series of forums about strategies to deal with natural disaster. The focus is on changing human behavior and development in order to coexist with natural phenomena rather than trying to control natural phenomena.
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More El Niños May Mean More Rainfall Extremes

More El Niños May Mean More Rainfall Extremes

Date: January 16, 2001
Creator: Earth Observatory
Description: Researchers at NASA and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), studying changes in tropical precipitation patterns, have noted a higher frequency of El Niños and La Niñas over the last 21 years. In addition, when either of those events occur, the world can expect more months with unusually high or low precipitation with droughts more common than floods over land areas.
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National Plant Genome Initiative

National Plant Genome Initiative

Date: December 2001
Creator: National Science and Technology Council (U.S.). Committee on Science. Interagency Working Group on Plant Genomes.
Description: This report is an update on progress of federal plant genome research. The focus in this report is on plants that are economically important to agribusiness.
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The National Tenth Five-Year Plan for Environmental Protection(Abstract)

The National Tenth Five-Year Plan for Environmental Protection(Abstract)

Date: December 26, 2001
Creator: State Environmental Protection Administration
Description: The State Council approved the National Tenth Five-Year Plan for Environmental Protection on 26 December 2001, requesting that loca1 governments and the various departments strengthen environmental protection in close relation with the economic restructuring; raise funds for environmental protection through multiple channels in connection with the expansion of domestic demand, and establish the mechanism of environmental protection with the government playing the dominant role with market promotion and public participation. The State Council emphasizes that local governments should undertake the major responsibilities of environmental protection. The governments at various levels should integrate the tasks of the Plan into the target responsibility system for provincial governors, mayors, and county heads. Periodic examination should be carried out on the targets of total pollutant discharge control and environmental quality. The implementation of the Plan should be inspected and reported on every year. The State Council requests that the relevant departments should provide guidance and support in implementing the Plan according to their respective responsibilities. The State Environmental Protection Administration should conduct coordinated supervision, management, and inspection of the implementation of the Plan.
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New England Governors/Eastern Canadian Premiers Climate Change Action Plan 2001

New England Governors/Eastern Canadian Premiers Climate Change Action Plan 2001

Date: August 2001
Creator: The Committee on the Environment and of the Conference of New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers
Description: Recognizing the need for the region to provide leadership on the critical issue of climate change and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers established the regional climate change program in 2000. While the northeast represents a significant economic region with greenhouse gas emissions roughly equivalent to those of Spain, climate change is an international issue for which our states and provinces are only a relatively small part of the problem. However, through their leadership the Governors and Premiers have established our region as an internationally-recognized part of the solution.
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New Source of Natural Fertilizer Discovered in Oceans

New Source of Natural Fertilizer Discovered in Oceans

Date: August 8, 2001
Creator: National Science Foundation Office of Legislative and Public Affairs
Description: New findings suggest that the deep ocean is teeming with organisms that produce essential natural fertilizers. A National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded research team led by Jonathan Zehr, a marine scientist at the University of California, Santa Cruz, has discovered a previously unknown type of photosynthetic bacteria that fixes nitrogen, converting nitrogen from the atmosphere into a form other organisms can use.
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NOAA Makes New Tree Ring Data Available

NOAA Makes New Tree Ring Data Available

Date: October 17, 2001
Creator: NOAA News
Description: New data from tree rings from 500 sites around the world are now available from NOAA. These data are important because they provide climate scientists and resource managers with records of past climatic variability extending back thousands of years.
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NOAA Sets the El Niño Prediction Straight

NOAA Sets the El Niño Prediction Straight

Date: September 7, 2001
Creator: NOAA News
Description: El Niño is an abnormal warming of the ocean temperatures across the eastern tropical Pacific that affects weather around the globe. El Niño episodes usually occur approximately every four-five years. NOAA researchers and scientists are presently monitoring the formation of a possible weak El Niño and predict that the United States could experience very weak-to-marginal impacts late winter to early spring 2002.
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NOAA Updates What Defines Normal Temperature

NOAA Updates What Defines Normal Temperature

Date: September 6, 2001
Creator: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Description: Normal temperatures and precipitation levels for your area may have changed as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Climatic Data Center recently released new 'normal' data for about 8,000 weather stations. The data defines the normal temperature at locations across the United States, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and U.S. Pacific Islands. These data are used as a benchmark for weather forecasters to calculate day-to-day temperature and rainfall departures from typical levels and are also used by business, government and industry for planning, design and operations.
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