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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Wheat, Feed Grains, Cotton, Rice, and Oilseeds Provisions of the Enacted 1996 Farm Bill

Wheat, Feed Grains, Cotton, Rice, and Oilseeds Provisions of the Enacted 1996 Farm Bill

Date: May 20, 1996
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
When Congressional Legislation Interferes with Existing Contracts: Legal Issues

When Congressional Legislation Interferes with Existing Contracts: Legal Issues

Date: May 31, 2012
Creator: Meltz, Robert
Description: This report surveys the legal theories invoked when laws enacted by Congress interfere with contracts entered into before enactment, prompting suits against the United States by disappointed contract parties.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Where to Get Publications from The Executive and Independent Agencies: A Directory of Sources for Official Documents

Where to Get Publications from The Executive and Independent Agencies: A Directory of Sources for Official Documents

Date: January 21, 1997
Creator: Hays, Janet & Brudno, Deborah C
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Whistleblower Protections Under Federal Law: An Overview

Whistleblower Protections Under Federal Law: An Overview

Date: September 13, 2012
Creator: Shimabukuro, Jon O.
Description: This report provides an overview of key aspects of the 18 selected federal statutes applicable to individuals in certain private-sector industries. It focuses on the protections provided to employees who believe they have been subject to retaliation, rather than on how or where alleged misconduct should be disclosed. In addition, the report also includes an overview of the Whistleblower Protection Act. While state law may also provide whistleblower protections for employees, this report focuses only on the aforementioned federal statutory provisions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Who Are the "Middle Class"?

Who Are the "Middle Class"?

Date: October 22, 2008
Creator: Cashell, Brian W.
Description: There is no consensus definition of "middle class," neither is there an official government definition. What constitutes the middle class is relative, subjective, and not easily defined. The mid-point in the distribution is the median, and in 2007 the median household income was $50,233. How far above and below that amount the middle stretches remains an open question. This report explores the various definitions of the middle class and what salary ranges those definitions encompass, as well as related statistics and surveys that support this information.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
"Who is a Veteran?"-Basic Eligibility for Veterans' Benefits

"Who is a Veteran?"-Basic Eligibility for Veterans' Benefits

Date: January 23, 2012
Creator: unknown
Description: This report examines the basic eligibility criteria for VA administered veterans' benefits, including the issue of eligibility of members of the National Guard and reserve components.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Who Pays for Long-Term Services and Supports? A Fact Sheet

Who Pays for Long-Term Services and Supports? A Fact Sheet

Date: April 16, 2014
Creator: Colello, Kirsten J.
Description: This report discusses the long-term services and supports (LTSS) that refer to a broad range of health and health-related services and supports needed by individuals over an extended period of time.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties

Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties

Date: January 19, 2011
Creator: Grimmett, Jeanne J.
Description: U.S. trade agreements such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), World Trade Organization agreements, and bilateral free trade agreements (FTAs) have been approved by majority vote of each house rather than by two-thirds vote of the Senate - that is, they have been treated as congressional-executive agreements rather than as treaties. The congressional-executive agreement has been the vehicle for implementing Congress's long-standing policy of seeking trade benefits for the United States through reciprocal trade negotiations. This report discusses this topic in brief.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties

Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties

Date: July 13, 2012
Creator: Grimmett, Jeanne J.
Description: This report briefly discusses the process used to enact U.S. trade agreements such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), World Trade Organization agreements, and bilateral free trade agreements (FTAs). In each case these agreements have been approved by majority vote of each house rather than by two-thirds vote of the Senate - that is, they have been treated as congressional-executive agreements rather than as treaties.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties

Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties

Date: September 8, 2010
Creator: Grimmett, Jeanne J.
Description: U.S. trade agreements such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), World Trade Organization agreements, and bilateral free trade agreements (FTAs) have been approved by majority vote of each house rather than by two-thirds vote of the Senate - that is, they have been treated as congressional-executive agreements rather than as treaties. The congressional-executive agreement has been the vehicle for implementing Congress's long-standing policy of seeking trade benefits for the United States through reciprocal trade negotiations. This report discusses this topic in brief.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department