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 Country: Iraq
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
This report analyzes U.S. and international sanctions against Iran and provides examples of companies and countries that conduct business with Iran, based on a wide range of open-source reporting. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc700613/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
This report discusses the current political and social climate of Iraq, specifically in regards to the influence of the U.S. military presence over recent years. This report addresses planned and possible future efforts under the Obama Administration, including the scheduled gradual troops withdrawal. This report also discusses the continued tensions between various Iraqi sociocultural groups. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc700625/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
Operation Iraqi Freedom succeeded in overthrowing Saddam Hussein, but Iraq remains unstable because of Sunni Arab resentment and a related insurgency, now compounded by Sunni-Shiite violence that some believe is a civil war. This report discusses the background of the issue and examines several security challenges, response, and other policy options for the U.S. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8676/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
Operation Iraqi Freedom succeeded in overthrowing Saddam Hussein, but Iraq remains unstable because of Sunni Arab resentment and a related insurgency, now compounded by Sunni-Shiite violence that some believe is a civil war. This report discusses the background of the issue and examines several security challenges, response, and other policy options for the U.S. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9346/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
Operation Iraqi Freedom succeeded in overthrowing Saddam Hussein, but Iraq remains unstable because of Sunni Arab resentment and a related insurgency, compounded by burgeoning sectarian violence. According to its November 30, 2005, “Strategy for Victory,” the Bush Administration indicates that U.S. forces will remain in Iraq until the country is able to provide for its own security and does not serve as a host for radical Islamic terrorists. This report discusses the background of the issue and examines several security challenges, response, and other policy options for the U.S. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9023/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
Operation Iraqi Freedom succeeded in overthrowing Saddam Hussein, but Iraq remains unstable because of Sunni Arab resentment and a related insurgency, compounded by burgeoning Sunni-Shiite violence. According to its November 30, 2005, “Strategy for Victory,” the Bush Administration indicates that U.S. forces will remain in Iraq until the country is able to provide for its own security. This report discusses security challenges, responses, and policy options. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9756/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
Operation Iraqi Freedom overthrew Saddam Hussein’s regime, but Iraq remains unstable because of Sunni Arab resentment and a related insurgency, compounded by Sunni-Shiite violence that a January 2007 national intelligence estimate says has key elements of a “civil war.” Mounting U.S. casualties and financial costs — without clear signs of security progress — have intensified a debate within the United States over whether to wind down U.S. involvement without completely accomplishing initial U.S. goals. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10179/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
Operation Iraqi Freedom succeeded in overthrowing Saddam Hussein, but Iraq remains unstable because of Sunni Arab resentment and a related insurgency, now compounded by Sunni-Shiite violence that some believe is a civil war. According to its November 30, 2005, “Strategy for Victory,” the Bush Administration indicates that U.S. forces will remain in Iraq until the country is able to provide for its own security. This report discusses security challenges, responses, and policy options. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9775/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
Operation Iraqi Freedom succeeded in overthrowing Saddam Hussein, but Iraq remains unstable because of Sunni Arab resentment and a related insurgency, compounded by burgeoning sectarian violence. According to its November 30, 2005, “Strategy for Victory,” the Bush Administration indicates that U.S. forces will remain in Iraq until the country is able to provide for its own security and does not serve as a host for radical Islamic terrorists. This report discusses the background of the issue and examines several security challenges, response, and other policy options for the U.S. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9705/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
Operation Iraqi Freedom succeeded in overthrowing Saddam Hussein, but Iraq remains unstable because of Sunni Arab resentment and a related insurgency, now compounded by Sunni-Shiite violence that some believe is a civil war. This report discusses the background of the issue and examines several security challenges, response, and other policy options for the U.S. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9928/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
Operation Iraqi Freedom succeeded in overthrowing Saddam Hussein, but Iraq remains unstable because of Sunni Arab resentment and a related insurgency, compounded by burgeoning sectarian violence. According to its November 30, 2005, “Strategy for Victory,” the Bush Administration indicates that U.S. forces will remain in Iraq until the country is able to provide for its own security and does not serve as a host for radical Islamic terrorists. This report discusses the background of the issue and examines several security challenges, response, and other policy options for the U.S. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9324/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
Operation Iraqi Freedom succeeded in overthrowing Saddam Hussein, but Iraq remains unstable because of Sunni Arab resentment and a related insurgency, now compounded by Sunni-Shiite violence that some believe is a civil war. According to its November 30, 2005, "Strategy for Victory," the Bush Administration indicates that U.S. forces will remain in Iraq until the country is able to provide for its own security. Mounting U.S. casualties and financial costs -- without clear signs of security progress -- have intensified a debate within the United States over the wisdom of the invasion and whether to wind down U.S. involvement without completely accomplishing U.S. goals. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10468/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
This report discusses the current political and social climate of Iraq, specifically in regards to the influence of the U.S. military presence over recent years. It addresses planned and possible future efforts under the Obama Administration, including the scheduled gradual troops withdrawal. This report also discusses the continued tensions between various Iraqi sociocultural groups. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc770555/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
This report discusses the current political and social climate of Iraq, specifically in regards to the influence of the U.S. military presence over recent years. It addresses planned and possible future efforts under the Obama Administration, including the scheduled gradual troops withdrawal; some U.S. officials believe that a U.S. military presence is needed beyond the scheduled August 31, 2010 date. This report also discusses the continued tensions between various Iraqi sociocultural groups. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc743503/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
This report discusses the current political and social climate of Iraq, specifically in regards to the influence of the U.S. military presence over recent years. It addresses planned and possible future efforts under the Obama Administration, including the scheduled gradual troops withdrawal; some U.S. officials believe that a U.S. military presence is needed beyond the scheduled August 31, 2010 date. This report also discusses the continued tensions between various Iraqi sociocultural groups. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc743356/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
This report discusses the current political and social climate of Iraq, specifically in regards to the influence of the U.S. military presence over recent years. This report addresses planned and possible future efforts under the Obama Administration, including the scheduled gradual troops withdrawal. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc795849/
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security
This report discusses the current political and social climate of Iraq, specifically in regards to the influence of the U.S. military presence over recent years. This report addresses planned and possible future efforts under the Obama Administration, including the scheduled gradual troops withdrawal. This report also discusses the continued tensions between various Iraqi sociocultural groups. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc795744/
Iraq: Post-Saddam National Elections
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7230/
Iraq: Post-Saddam National Elections
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7232/
Iraq: Post-Saddam National Elections
This report discusses United States and United Nations preparations for Iraq’s planned elections for a transitional National Assembly, scheduled for January 30, 2005. Elections preparations are significantly hindered by continuing insurgency and threats of a boycott by many of Iraq’s Sunni Arabs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7859/
Iraq: Potential U.S. Military Operations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4279/
Iraq: Potential U.S. Military Operations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4280/
Iraq: Recent Developments in Reconstruction Assistance
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7843/
Iraq: Recent Developments in Reconstruction Assistance
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4294/
Iraq: Recent Developments in Reconstruction Assistance
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4295/
Iraq: Recent Developments in Reconstruction Assistance
Following years of authoritarian rule and economic sanctions, the United States and the international community agreed in the spring of 2003 that efforts should be made to introduce economic reform and democratic government to post-war Iraq. More recently, the Bush Administration has asserted a “victory” strategy composed of eight objectives, five of which are to: transition Iraq to security self-reliance, help Iraqis form a national compact for democratic government, help Iraq build government capacity and provide essential services, help Iraq strengthen its economy, and help Iraq strengthen the rule of law and promote civil rights. To meet these ends, a large-scale reconstruction assistance program has been undertaken by the United States in Iraq. This report describes recent developments in this assistance effort. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8112/
Iraq: Recent Developments in Reconstruction Assistance
Large-scale reconstruction assistance programs are being undertaken by the United States following the war with Iraq. To fund such programs, Congress approved on April 12, 2003, a $2.48 billion Iraq Relief and Reconstruction Fund (IRRF) in the FY2003 Supplemental Appropriation. On November 6, 2003, the President signed into law P.L. 108-106, the FY2004 Emergency Supplemental Appropriation, providing $18.4 billion for Iraq reconstruction. Contributions pledged at the October 24, 2003, Madrid donor conference by other donors amounted to roughly $3.6 billion in grant aid and as much as $13.3 billion in possible loans. This report describes recent developments in this assistance effort. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8314/
Iraq: Recent Developments in Reconstruction Assistance
Following years of authoritarian rule and economic sanctions, the United States and the international community agreed in the spring of 2003 that efforts should be made to introduce economic reform and democratic government to post-war Iraq. More recently, the Bush Administration has asserted a “victory” strategy composed of eight objectives, five of which are to: transition Iraq to security self-reliance, help Iraqis form a national compact for democratic government, help Iraq build government capacity and provide essential services, help Iraq strengthen its economy, and help Iraq strengthen the rule of law and promote civil rights. To meet these ends, a large-scale reconstruction assistance program has been undertaken by the United States in Iraq. This report describes recent developments in this assistance effort. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8355/
Iraq: Recent Developments in Reconstruction Assistance
Following years of authoritarian rule and economic sanctions, the United States and the international community agreed in the spring of 2003 that efforts should be made to rehabilitate economic infrastructure and introduce representative government to post-war Iraq, among other objectives. More recently, the Bush Administration has asserted a “victory” strategy composed of eight objectives, five of which are to: transition Iraq to security self-reliance, help Iraqis form a national compact for democratic government, help Iraq build government capacity and provide essential services, help Iraq strengthen its economy, and help Iraq strengthen the rule of law and promote civil rights. To meet these ends, a large-scale assistance program has been undertaken by the United States in Iraq. This report describes recent developments in this assistance effort. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9546/
Iraq: Recent Developments in Reconstruction Assistance
Following years of authoritarian rule and economic sanctions, the United States and the international community agreed in the spring of 2003 that efforts should be made to rehabilitate economic infrastructure and introduce representative government to post-war Iraq, among other objectives. More recently, the Bush Administration has asserted a “victory” strategy composed of eight objectives, five of which are to: transition Iraq to security self-reliance, help Iraqis form a national compact for democratic government, help Iraq build government capacity and provide essential services, help Iraq strengthen its economy, and help Iraq strengthen the rule of law and promote civil rights. To meet these ends, a large-scale assistance program has been undertaken by the United States in Iraq. This report describes recent developments in this assistance effort. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9879/
Iraq: Reconstruction Assistance
This report describes recent developments in the large-scale assistance program, the Iraq Relief and Reconstruction Fund (IRRF), undertaken by the United States and the international community in an effort to rehabilitate economic infrastructure and introduce representative government to post-war Iraq, and examines key issues of potential interest to Congress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc461915/
Iraq: Reconstruction Assistance
This report describes recent developments in the assistance effort in post-authoritarian Iraq and key issues of potential interest to Congress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc689287/
Iraq: Reconstruction Assistance
This report describes recent developments in the assistance effort in post-authoritarian Iraq and key issues of potential interest to Congress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc689109/
Iraq: Reconstruction Assistance
Following the 2003 intervention in Iraq, the United States undertook a large-scale assistance program meant to stabilize the country, rehabilitate economic infrastructure, and introduce representative government, among other objectives. Even as the U.S. military role in Iraq winds down, this program, funded through a mix of appropriations accounts, will continue to be scrutinized closely by the 111th Congress. This report describes recent developments in this assistance effort. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc689298/
Iraq: Reconstruction Assistance
This report describes recent developments in the assistance effort in post-authoritarian Iraq and key issues of potential interest to Congress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc689207/
Iraq: Reconstruction Assistance
Following the 2003 intervention in Iraq, the United States undertook a large-scale assistance program meant to stabilize the country, rehabilitate economic infrastructure, and introduce representative government, among other objectives. Even as the U.S. military role in Iraq winds down, this program, funded through a mix of appropriations accounts, will continue to be scrutinized closely by the 111th Congress. This report describes recent developments in this assistance effort. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc689436/
Iraq: Regional Perspectives and U.S. Policy
This report provides information about the current perspectives and policies of Iraq's neighbors following the fall of the Saddam Hussein regime in 2003; analyzes potential regional responses to renewed violence and longer-term stabilization efforts; discusses shared concerns and U.S. long-term regional interests; and reviews U.S. policy options for responding to various contingencies. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc689463/
Iraq: Summary of U.S. Casualties
This report provides statistics on fatalities during Operation Iraqi Freedom, which began on March 19, 2003, as well as on the number of fatalities since May 1, 2003, plus statistics on those wounded, but not killed, since March 19, 2003. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9892/
Iraq: Summary of U.S. Casualties
The following casualty data was compiled by the Department of Defense (DOD), as tallied from the agency's press release. Table 1 provides statistics on fatalities during Operation Iraqi Freedom, which began on March 19, 2003, and is ongoing, as well as on the number of fatalities since May 1, 2003, plus statistics on those wounded, but not killed, since March 19, 2003. A detailed casualty summary that includes data on deaths by cause, as well as statistics on soldiers wounded in action, is available at the following DOD website: [http://siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil/personnel/CASUALTY/castop.htm]. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10241/
Iraq: Summary of U.S. Casualties
This report provides casualty data compiled by the Department of Defense (DOD), as tallied from the agency’s press releases. Table 1 provides statistics on fatalities during Operation Iraqi Freedom, which began on March 19, 2003, and is ongoing, as well as on the number of fatalities since May 1, 2003, plus statistics on those wounded, but not killed, since March 19, 2003. Statistics may be revised as circumstances are investigated and as all records are processed through the U.S. military’s casualty system. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8982/
Iraq: Transition to Sovereignty
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6132/
Iraq: U.N. Inspections for Weapons of Mass Destruction
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5688/
Iraq: U.N. Inspections for Weapons of Mass Destruction
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5689/
Iraq: U.N. Inspections for Weapons of Mass Destruction
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5690/
Iraq: U.S. Casualties
This report consists of a brief table summarizing casualty data compiled by the Department of Defense (DOD), including fatalities during Operation Iraqi Freedom since March 19, 2003, and since May 1, 2003, including statistics on those wounded, but not killed, since March 19, 2003. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc26316/
Iraq: U.S. Casualties
This report contains a table that provides statistics on fatalities and injuries during Operation Iraqi Freedom, which began on March 19, 2003. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc689270/
Iraq: U.S. Casualties
This report contains a table that provides statistics on fatalities and injuries during Operation Iraqi Freedom, which began on March 19, 2003. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc689129/
Iraq: U.S. Casualties
This report contains a table that provides statistics on fatalities and injuries during Operation Iraqi Freedom, which began on March 19, 2003. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc689159/
Iraq: U.S. Casualties
The following casualty data was compiled by the Department of Defense (DOD), as tallied from the agency's press release. Table 1 provides statistics on fatalities during Operation Iraqi Freedom, which began on March 19, 2003, and is ongoing, as well as on the number of fatalities since May 1, 2003, plus statistics on those wounded, but not killed, since March 19, 2003. More frequent updates are available at DOD's website at [http://www.defenselink.mil/news/] under "Casualty Update." A detailed casualty summary that includes data on deaths by cause, as well as statistics on soldiers wounded in action, is available at the following DOD website: [http://siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil/personnel/CASUALTY/castop.htm]. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10593/
Iraq: U.S. Casualties
The following casualty data was compiled by the Department of Defense (DOD), as tallied from the agency's press release. Table 1 provides statistics on fatalities during Operation Iraqi Freedom, which began on March 19, 2003, and is ongoing, as well as on the number of fatalities since May 1, 2003, plus statistics on those wounded, but not killed, since March 19, 2003. More frequent updates are available at DOD's website at [http://www.defenselink.mil/news/] under "Casualty Update." A detailed casualty summary that includes data on deaths by cause, as well as statistics on soldiers wounded in action, is available at the following DOD website: [http://siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil/personnel/CASUALTY/castop.htm]. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10592/