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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
U.S. Nuclear Cooperation with India: Issues for Congress
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U.S. Nuclear Cooperation with India: Issues for Congress
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U.S. Nuclear Cooperation with India: Issues for Congress
On July 18, 2005, President Bush announced he would "work to achieve full civil nuclear energy cooperation with India" and would "also seek agreement from Congress to adjust U.S. laws and policies," in the context of a broader, global partnership with India to promote stability, democracy, prosperity and peace. Administration officials have promoted nuclear cooperation with India as a way to reduce India's carbon dioxide emissions and its dependence on oil, bring India into the "nonproliferation mainstream" and create jobs for U.S. industry. Nonproliferation experts have suggested that potential costs to U.S. and global nonproliferation policy of nuclear cooperation with India may far exceed the benefits. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10365/
U.S. Nuclear Cooperation with India: Issues for Congress
On July 18, 2005, President Bush announced he would "work to achieve full civil nuclear energy cooperation with India" and would "also seek agreement from Congress to adjust U.S. laws and policies," in the context of a broader, global partnership with India to promote stability, democracy, prosperity and peace. Administration officials have promoted nuclear cooperation with India as a way to reduce India's carbon dioxide emissions and its dependence on oil, bring India into the "nonproliferation mainstream" and create jobs for U.S. industry. Nonproliferation experts have suggested that potential costs to U.S. and global nonproliferation policy of nuclear cooperation with India may far exceed the benefits. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10366/
U.S. Nuclear Cooperation with India: Issues for Congress
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U.S. Nuclear Cooperation with India: Issues for Congress
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U.S. Nuclear Cooperation with India: Issues for Congress
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U.S. Nuclear Cooperation with India: Issues for Congress
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U.S. Nuclear Cooperation with India: Issues for Congress
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U.S. Nuclear Weapons: Changes in Policy and Force Structure
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U.S. Nuclear Weapons: Changes in Policy and Force Structure
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U.S. Nuclear Weapons: Changes in Policy and Force Structure
The Bush Administration conducted a review of U.S. nuclear weapons force posture during its first year in office. Although the review sought to adjust U.S. nuclear posture to address changes in the international security environment at the start of the new century, it continued many of the policies and programs that had been a part of the U.S. nuclear posture during the previous decade and during the Cold War. This report, which will be updated as needed, provides an overview of the U.S. nuclear posture to highlight areas of change and areas of continuity. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10450/
U.S. Nuclear Weapons: Changes in Policy and Force Structure
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U.S. Nuclear Weapons: Changes in Policy and Force Structure
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U.S. Nuclear Weapons: Changes in Policy and Force Structure
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U.S. Nuclear Weapons: Changes in Policy and Force Structure
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U.S. Occupation Assistance: Iraq, Germany, and Japan Compared
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U.S. Occupation Assistance: Iraq, Germany, and Japan Compared
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The U.S. Occupation of Haiti, 1915-1934
In 1915, the United States undertook a military occupation of Haiti to preempt any European intervention, to establish order out of civil strife, and to stabilize Haitian finances. During the nineteen-year occupation, U.S. military and civilian officials, numbering less than 2500 for the most part, supervised the collection of taxes and the disbursement of revenues, maintained public order, and initiated a program of public works. The Haitian government remained in place, but was subject to U.S. guidance. The Haitian people benefitted from the end of endemic political violence and from the construction of roads, bridges, and ports as well as from improved access to health care. The U.S. occupation was, nonetheless, deeply resented throughout Haitian society, and many of its accomplishments did not long endure its termination in 1934. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc26045/
U.S. Offshore Oil and Gas Resources: Prospects and Processes
This report examines questions around lifting the moratoria on Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) exploration and production and the significance of the change on U.S. oil and natural gas supplies and markets. The report presents the current U.S. oil and gas supply-and-demand picture and provides a discussion of legislative issues, resource assessments, the leasing system, and environmental and social issues associated with offshore oil and gas development. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc97974/
U.S. Offshore Oil and Gas Resources: Prospects and Processes
Access to potential oil and gas resources under the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) continues to be controversial. Moratoria on leasing and development in certain areas were largely eliminated in 2008 and 2009, although a few areas remain legislatively off limits to leasing. The 112th Congress may be unlikely to reinstate broad leasing moratoria, but some Members have expressed interest in protecting areas (e.g., the Georges Bank or Northern California) or establishing protective coastal buffers. Pressure to expand oil and gas supplies and protect coastal environments and communities will likely lead Congress and the Administration to consider carefully which areas to keep open to leasing and which to protect from development. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc40077/
U.S. Oil Imports and Exports
Oil import and export developments pose a host of policy issues. Concerns about import dependence continue to generate interest in policy options to directly discourage imports or to reduce the need for imports by increasing domestic supply and decreasing demand. Rising exports at a time of rising prices has led to calls for policies to restrict such trade. The debate around the Keystone XL pipeline involves concerns about imports, exports, and the environment. The rising cost for fuels has led to calls for release of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, meant to provide a short term policy option in case of supply disruptions. Policy options may entail various economic, fiscal, and environmental trade-offs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc86624/
U.S. Oil Imports: Context and Considerations
This report discusses U.S. oil imports and trade deficit. Other policy considerations by congress are discussed in this brief. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc40132/
The U.S. Oil Refining Industry: Background in Changing Markets and Fuel Policies
This report begins by looking at the current production capacity of the oil refineries operating in the United States, and the sources and changes in crude oil supply. It then examines the changing characteristics of petroleum and petroleum product markets and identifies the effects of these changes on the refining industry. The report concludes with discussion of the policy and regulatory factors that are likely to affect the structure and performance of the industry during the next decade. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29627/
The U.S. Oil Refining Industry: Background in Changing Markets and Fuel Policies
This report begins by looking at the current production capacity of the oil refineries operating in the United States, and the sources and changes in crude oil supply. It then examines the changing characteristics of petroleum and petroleum product markets and identifies the effects of these changes on the refining industry. The report concludes with discussion of the policy and regulatory factors that are likely to affect the structure and performance of the industry during the next decade. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31385/
U.S. Periods of War
Many wars or conflicts in U.S. history have federally designated "periods of war," dates marking their beginning and ending. These dates are important for qualification for certain veterans' pension or disability benefits. This report lists the beginning and ending dates for "periods of war" found in Title 38 of the Code of Federal Regulations, dealing with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). It also lists and differentiates other beginning dates given in declarations of war, as well as termination of hostilities' dates and armistice and ending dates given in proclamations, laws, or treaties. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10585/
U.S. Periods of War
Many wars or conflicts in U.S. history have federally designated "periods of war," dates marking their beginning and ending. This report lists the beginning and ending dates for "periods of war" found in Title 38 of the Code of Federal Regulations, dealing with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). It also lists and differentiates other beginning dates given in declarations of war, as well as termination of hostilities dates and armistice and ending dates given in proclamations, laws, or treaties. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31444/
U.S. Periods of War and Dates of Current Conflicts
This report lists the beginning and ending dates for "periods of war" found in Title 38 of the Code of Federal Regulations, dealing with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). It also lists and differentiates other beginning dates given in declarations of war, as well as termination of hostilities dates and armistice and ending dates given in proclamations, laws, or treaties. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc94186/
U.S. Periods of War and Dates of Current Conflicts
This report lists the beginning and ending dates for "periods of war" found in Title 38 of the Code of Federal Regulations, dealing with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). It also lists and differentiates other beginning dates given in declarations of war, as well as termination of hostilities dates and armistice and ending dates given in proclamations, laws, or treaties. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc84108/
U.S. Policy Regarding the International Criminal Court
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U.S. Policy Regarding the International Criminal Court
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U.S. Policy Regarding the International Criminal Court
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U.S. Policy Regarding the International Criminal Court
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U.S. Policy Regarding the International Criminal Court
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U.S. Policy Regarding the International Criminal Court
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U.S. Policy Regarding the International Criminal Court
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U.S. Policy Toward the China-Taiwan Relationship: Summary of a CRS Workshop
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The U.S. Population: A Factsheet
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The U.S. Postal Service and Six-Day Delivery: Issues for Congress
This report will examine the history of six-day mail delivery and analyze potential effects of reducing USPS delivery from six to five days. It will then examine legislative options for the 111th Congress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83926/
The U.S. Postal Service and Six-Day Delivery: Issues for Congress
This report will examine the history of six-day mail delivery and analyze potential effects of reducing USPS delivery from six to five days. It will then examine legislative options for the 111th Congress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc26160/
U.S. Postal Service: Background and Analysis of H.R. 2309 and S. 1789 in the 112th Congress
This report looks at how the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) has taken steps to save money. It also covers how bills H.R. 2309 and S. 1789 include major reforms, such as reductions in service, expansion of the USPS's authority to provide products and services, and alterations to the postal employees pension and healthcare plans. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc96729/
The U.S. Postal Service Response to the Threat of Bioterrorism Through the Mail
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The U.S. Postal Service's Financial Condition: A Primer
Report that discusses the USPS financial challenges, agency's revenues, and recent financial difficulties. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc227892/
The U.S. Postal Service's Financial Condition: Overview and Issues for Congress
This report provides an overview of the U.S. Postal Service's (USPS's) financial condition, legislation enacted to alleviate the USPS's financial challenges, and possible issues for the 112th Congress. It also includes a side-by-side comparison of two of the postal reform bills, H.R. 2309 and S. 1789. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83934/
The U.S. Postal Service's Use of Contractors to Deliver Mail: Background and Recent Developments
Currently, the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) is collectively bargaining with the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC) and National Rural Letter Carriers Association (NRLCA). One issue that may or may not be settled is the Postal Service's use of non-USPS employees (i.e., contractors) to deliver mail. If the parties cannot come to a satisfactory arrangement, Congress may be approached to consider the matter. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc87234/
U.S. Prisoners of War and Civilian American Citizens Captured and Interned by Japan in World War II: The Issue of Compensation by Japan
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U.S. Prisoners of War and Civilian American Citizens Captured and Interned by Japan in World War II: The Issue of Compensation by Japan
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U.S. Prisoners of War and Civilian American Citizens Captured and Interned by Japan in World War II: The Issue of Compensation by Japan
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U.S. Prisoners of War and Civilian American Citizens Captured and Interned by Japan in World War II: The Issue of Compensation by Japan
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U.S. Public Diplomacy: Background on the 9/11 Commission Recommendations
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