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 Country: China
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
China's Holdings of U.S. Securities: Implications for the U.S. Economy

China's Holdings of U.S. Securities: Implications for the U.S. Economy

Date: February 27, 2008
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M.
Description: This report examines the importance to the U.S. economy of China's investment in U.S. securities, as well as U.S. concerns over the possibility that China might unload a large share of those holdings, including the likelihood that this would occur, and the potential implications such action could have for the U.S. economy. The report concludes that a large sell-off of Chinese Treasury securities holdings could negatively affect the U.S. economy, at least in the short-run. As a result, such a move could diminish U.S. demand for Chinese products and thus could lower China's economic growth as well.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China's "Hot Money" Problems

China's "Hot Money" Problems

Date: July 21, 2008
Creator: Martin, Michael F. & Morrison, Wayne M.
Description: China has experienced a sharp rise in the inflow of so-called "hot money," foreign capital entering the country supposedly seeking short-term profits, especially in 2008. Chinese estimates of the amount of "hot money" in China vary from $500 billion to $1.75 trillion. The influx of "hot money" is contributing to China's already existing problems with inflation. Efforts to reduce the inflationary effects of "hot money" may accelerate the inflow, while actions to reduce the inflow of "hot money" may threaten China's economic growth, as well as have negative consequences for the U.S. and global economy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China's Sovereign Wealth Fund: Developments and Policy Implications

China's Sovereign Wealth Fund: Developments and Policy Implications

Date: September 23, 2010
Creator: Martin, Michael F.
Description: China's ruling executive body, the State Council, established the China Investment Corporation (CIC), a sovereign wealth fund, in September 2007 to invest $200 billion of China's then $1.4 trillion in foreign exchange reserves. Congress and financial analysts raised concerns about the CIC after its creation, partly because it was a comparatively large sovereign wealth fund, partly because it was government-owned, and partly because it reported directly to the State Council. These concerns raise question about U.S. policies on inward foreign direct investment (FDI) and the global competitiveness of U.S. financial institutions. Certain commentators suggest that more should be done to protect the United States from China's rising role in international capital markets.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. International Trade: Trends and Forecasts

U.S. International Trade: Trends and Forecasts

Date: November 19, 2010
Creator: Nanto, Dick K. & Donnelly, J. Michael
Description: This report discusses the U.S. trade deficit in light of the 2008 global financial crisis, with emphasis on international trade and U.S. trade policy, most recent developments in trade of goods and service, trade forecasts for the future, and how issues such as the U.S. trade deficit and international trade, particularly with China, are commonly perceived.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. International Trade: Trends and Forecasts

U.S. International Trade: Trends and Forecasts

Date: October 15, 2010
Creator: Nanto, Dick K. & Donnelly, J. Michael
Description: This report discusses the U.S. trade deficit in light of the 2008 global financial crisis, with emphasis on international trade and U.S. trade policy, most recent developments in trade of goods and service, trade forecasts for the future, and how issues such as the U.S. trade deficit and international trade, particularly with China, are commonly perceived.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
World Bank Lending to China

World Bank Lending to China

Date: April 25, 1996
Creator: Sanford, Jonathan E
Description: Lending to China from the multilateral development banks (MDBs) increased four-fold between 1985 and 1994, from $1.1 billion to $4.3 billion. China is now the MDBs' largest single borrower country. There is considerable debate today, however, whether the MDBs should continue lending to China. In particular, there is sharp debate whether the World Bank should continue making concessional loans to China.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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