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 Resource Type: Report
 Decade: 2000-2009
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
9/11 Commission Recommendations: The Senate Confirmation Process for Presidential Nominees

9/11 Commission Recommendations: The Senate Confirmation Process for Presidential Nominees

Date: November 22, 2004
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: On July 22, 2004, the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, known as the 9/11 Commission, issued its final report, detailing the events up to and including the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks upon the United States. The 9/11 Commission recommended that the Senate adopt rules requiring hearings and votes to confirm or reject national security nominees within 30 days of their submission at the start of each new presidential administration. Implementing the commission's proposal would involve imposing new restrictions on both the power of committee chairs to control the agenda of their committees and the rights of Senators to delay or block nominations through holds and extended debate. This report discusses in detail this proposal, how it could be implemented, and the potential effects of its implementation.
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9/11 Commission Recommendations: The Senate Confirmation Process for Presidential Nominees

9/11 Commission Recommendations: The Senate Confirmation Process for Presidential Nominees

Date: March 23, 2005
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: On July 22, 2004, the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, known as the 9/11 Commission, issued its final report, detailing the events up to and including the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks upon the United States. The 9/11 Commission recommended that the Senate adopt rules requiring hearings and votes to confirm or reject national security nominees within 30 days of their submission at the start of each new presidential administration. Implementing the commission's proposal would involve imposing new restrictions on both the power of committee chairs to control the agenda of their committees and the rights of Senators to delay or block nominations through holds and extended debate. This report discusses in detail this proposal, how it could be implemented, and the potential effects of its implementation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
S. 3521, the Stop Over Spending Act of 2006: A Brief Summary

S. 3521, the Stop Over Spending Act of 2006: A Brief Summary

Date: July 14, 2006
Creator: Heniff, Bill, Jr.
Description: S. 3521, the Stop Over Spending Act of 2006, proposes several changes to the congressional budget process. This report provides a brief summary of the major provisions of S. 3521.
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The Advisory Panel's Tax Reform Proposals

The Advisory Panel's Tax Reform Proposals

Date: July 13, 2006
Creator: Gravelle, Jane G.
Description: In early 2005, the President appointed a tax reform advisory panel to formulate tax reform proposals. The report of the President’s Advisory Panel on Tax Reform, issued in November 2005, recommended two reform plans to consider: 1) a revised income tax, referred to as the simplified income tax (SIT); and 2) a consumption tax coupled with a tax on financial income, referred to as the growth and investment tax (GIT). This report discusses the provisions and implications of these two taxes in detail.
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Assassination Ban and E.O. 12333: A Brief Summary

Assassination Ban and E.O. 12333: A Brief Summary

Date: January 4, 2002
Creator: Bazan, Elizabeth B
Description: This report offers a brief summary of the assassination ban contained in Executive Order (E.O.) 12333, Section 2.11. E.O. 12333 is the latest in a series of three executive orders which included assassination bans. The first, Executive Order 11905, Sec. 5(g),1 41 Fed. Reg. 7703, 7733 (President Gerald Ford, 2/19/76), was part of an executive order issued by President Ford in response to concerns raised in the 1970's with respect to alleged abuses by the U.S. intelligence community.
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Authority of a President to Modify or Eliminate a National Monument

Authority of a President to Modify or Eliminate a National Monument

Date: August 3, 2000
Creator: Baldwin, Pamela
Description: President Clinton created a number of new national monuments, using authority given the President under the Antiquities Act of 1906. Many of the designations were controversial and renewed discussion of that Act and whether a President can modify or eliminate a Presidentially created national monument. This report examines that question.
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Authorization for Use of Military Force in Response to the 9/11 Attacks (P.L. 107-40): Legislative History

Authorization for Use of Military Force in Response to the 9/11 Attacks (P.L. 107-40): Legislative History

Date: January 4, 2006
Creator: Grimmett, Richard F
Description: This report provides a legislative history of the legislation, S.J.Res. 23 , the “Authorization for Use of Military Force” (AUMF), which, as Congress stated in its text, constitutes the legislative authorization for the use of U.S. military force contemplated by the War Powers Resolution. It also is the statute which the President and his attorneys have subsequently cited as an authority for him to engage in electronic surveillance against possible terrorists without obtaining authorization of the special Court created by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) of 1978, as amended.
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The Chief Justice of the United States: Responsibilities of the Office and Process for Appointment

The Chief Justice of the United States: Responsibilities of the Office and Process for Appointment

Date: March 17, 2005
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven & Tong, Lorraine H
Description: As part of Senate consideration, the Judiciary Committee holds hearings on the nominee and votes on whether to report the nomination favorably, unfavorably, or without recommendation. Regardless of the outcome of that vote, the reporting of a Supreme Court nomination sends it to the full Senate for debate and a vote. Like the President, Senators may evaluate the nominee by such standards as professional excellence, integrity, and leadership qualities, but may also (again, as the President is free to do) focus on the nominee's judicial philosophy, views on constitutional issues, or how they believe the appointment might affect the Court's future direction on major legal and constitutional issues.
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Cloture Attempts on Nominations

Cloture Attempts on Nominations

Date: April 22, 2005
Creator: Beth, Richard S & Palmer, Betsy
Description: Cloture is the only means by which the Senate can vote to limit debate on a matter, and thereby overcome a possible filibuster. It would be erroneous, however, to assume that cases in which cloture is sought are the same as those in which a filibuster occurs. Cloture may be sought when no filibuster is taking place, and filibusters may occur without cloture being sought.
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Congressional Access to Executive Branch Information: Legislative Tools

Congressional Access to Executive Branch Information: Legislative Tools

Date: May 17, 2001
Creator: Fisher, Louis
Description: This report begins by reviewing the precedents established during the Washington Administration for withholding documents from Congress. Close examination reveals that the scope of presidential privilege is often exaggerated. Congress had access to more documentation than is commonly believed and might have had more had it pressed for it. Subsequent sections focus on various forms of congressional leverage: the power of the purse, the power to impeach, issuing congressional subpoenas, holding executive officials in contempt, House resolutions of inquiry, GAO investigations, and blocking nominations, all of which may force executive officials to release documents they would otherwise want to keep private and confidential. Even if Presidents announce perfectly plausible grounds for withholding documents, they may have to comply with the congressional will to achieve other more important goals.
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