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 Decade: 2000-2009
 Year: 2008
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Overview, FY2009 Budget, and Issues for Congress

National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Overview, FY2009 Budget, and Issues for Congress

Date: October 29, 2008
Creator: Morgan, Daniel & Behrens, Carl E.
Description: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducts U.S. civilian space and aeronautics activities. For FY2009, the Administration requested $17.614 billion for NASA, and increase of 1.8% from the FY2008 appropriation of $17.309 billion. The President's 2004 Moon/Mars Vision for Space Exploration is the major focus of NASA's activities. Issues for Congress regarding this goal include the development of new vehicles for human spaceflight, plans for the transition to these vehicles after the space shuttle is retired in 2010, and the balance in NASA's priorities between human space exploration and the agency's activities in science and aeronautics.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China's Space Program: Options for U.S.-China Cooperation

China's Space Program: Options for U.S.-China Cooperation

Date: September 29, 2008
Creator: Logan, Jeffrey
Description: This report outlines recent activities and future plans in China's civilian space sector. It also discusses benefits and trade-offs of possible U.S.-China collaboration in space, as well as several options to improve space relations, including information exchange, policy dialogue, and joint activities. The report also includes discussion of China's controversial January 2007 testing of antisatellite weapons.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. Civilian Space Policy Priorities: Reflections 50 Years After Sputnik

U.S. Civilian Space Policy Priorities: Reflections 50 Years After Sputnik

Date: June 20, 2008
Creator: Stine, Deborah D.
Description: This report describes Sputnik and its influence on today's U.S. civilian space policy, the actions other nations and commercial organizations are taking in space exploration, and why the nation invests in space exploration and the public's attitude toward it. The report concludes with a discussion of possible options for future U.S. civilian space policy priorities and the implication of those priorities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Hubble Space Telescope: NASA's Plans for a Servicing Mission

Hubble Space Telescope: NASA's Plans for a Servicing Mission

Date: May 23, 2008
Creator: Morgan, Daniel
Description: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) estimates that without a servicing mission to replace key components, the Hubble Space Telescope will cease scientific operations in 2008. In January 2004, then-NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe announced that the space shuttle would no longer be used to service Hubble. Hubble supporters criticized this as a result of President Bush's new Vision for Space Exploration; said supporters sought to reverse the decision and proceed with a shuttle servicing mission. In October 2006, NASA approved a shuttle mission to service Hubble. That mission is now scheduled for October 8, 2008.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China's Space Program: Options for U.S.-China Cooperation

China's Space Program: Options for U.S.-China Cooperation

Date: May 21, 2008
Creator: Logan, Jeffrey
Description: China has a determined, yet still modest, program of civilian space activities planned for the next decade. The potential for U.S.-China cooperation in space -- an issue of interest to Congress -- has become more controversial since the January 2007 Chinese anti-satellite test. Some argue that Chinese capabilities now threaten U.S. space assets in low earth orbit. Others stress the need to expand dialogue with China. This report outlines recent activities and future plans in China's civilian space sector. It also discusses benefits and trade-offs of possible U.S.-China collaboration in space, as well as several options to improve space relations, including information exchange, policy dialogue, and joint activities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department