You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Country: Afghanistan
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Afghanistan: Soviet Invasion and U.S. Response

Afghanistan: Soviet Invasion and U.S. Response

Date: May 2, 1980
Creator: Afghanistan Task Force
Description: The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan has raised a number of serious issues and choices for the United States. The train of events seem likely to have an important influence on overall American foreign policy in the 1980s. Reassessment of Soviet motives and of U.S. roles in the world are already in progress. Emerging American attitudes, in turn, will shape more specific policy decisions on several issues, which this issue brief discusses.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Yellow Rain and Related Issues: Implications for the United States

Yellow Rain and Related Issues: Implications for the United States

Date: September 29, 1983
Creator: Bowman, Steven R
Description: The United States has charged that the Soviet Union is implicated in the use of chemical weapons in Afghanistan and of chemical and toxin weapons, including the toxin known as "Yellow Rain," in Laos and Kampuchea (Cambodia). These charges raise two significant sets of issues: First, issues surrounding the evidence that has been presented to show: (a) that such weapons have been used and (b) that the Soviet Union is implicated in this use. Second, issues connected with the implications of Soviet involvement, if proven, in chemical and toxin warfare.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan: Connections to Islamic Movements In Central and South Asia and Southern Russia

Afghanistan: Connections to Islamic Movements In Central and South Asia and Southern Russia

Date: December 7, 1999
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: After several years of relative peace in Central Asia and southern Russia, Islamic extremist movements have become more active in Russia and in Central and South Asia, threatening stability in the region. Although numerous factors might account for the upsurge in activity, several of these movements appear to have connections to the Islamic fundamentalist Taliban regime in Afghanistan. These linkages raise questions about whether the United States, as part of a broader effort to promote peace and stability in the region, should continue to engage the Taliban regime, or strongly confront it. This report will be updated as events warrant.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan: Current Issues and U.S. Policy Concerns

Afghanistan: Current Issues and U.S. Policy Concerns

Date: November 15, 2001
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: The United States and its allies are helping Afghanistan emerging from more than 22 years of warfare, although substantial risk to Afghan stability remains. Before the U.S. military campaign against the orthodox Islamist Taliban movement began on October 7, 2001, Afghanistan had been mired in conflict since the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979. The defeat of the Taliban has enabled the United States and its coalition partners to send forces throughout Afghanistan to search for Taliban and Al Qaeda fighters and leaders that remain at large, including Osama bin Laden. As the war against remaining Al Qaeda and Taliban elements winds down, the United States is shifting its military focus toward stabilizing the interim government, including training a new Afghan national army, and supporting the international security force (ISAF) that is helping the new government provide security.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Agriculture in Afghanistan and Neighboring Asian Countries

Agriculture in Afghanistan and Neighboring Asian Countries

Date: November 16, 2001
Creator: Jurenas, Remy
Description: Agriculture (as measured by share of gross domestic product and employment) is a significant economic sector in seven Central and South Asian countries: Afghanistan, Iran, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. All of these countries are net food importers. Some have experienced successive years of drought, which has contributed to noticeable declines in agricultural output and the need to increase commodity imports. The United Nations’ World Food Program reports that both Afghanistan and Tajikistan are currently in need of emergency food assistance to cover sizable food deficits. The food outlook in Afghanistan is made uncertain by ongoing military conflict.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan's Path to Reconstruction: Obstacles, Challenges, and Issues for Congress

Afghanistan's Path to Reconstruction: Obstacles, Challenges, and Issues for Congress

Date: April 8, 2002
Creator: Margesson, Rhoda
Description: Once hostilities end in Afghanistan and the Afghan phase of the war on terrorism starts to wind down, reconstruction efforts will begin in earnest. International attention will likely turn to Afghanistan’s short- and medium-term future, raising questions between the United States and its allies about division of labor, burdensharing, and exit strategies. It is anticipated that Congress will examine reconstruction efforts underway, aid priorities, long-term reconstruction proposals, and the implementation role to be played by the United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan: Challenges and Options for Reconstructing a Stable and Moderate State

Afghanistan: Challenges and Options for Reconstructing a Stable and Moderate State

Date: April 24, 2002
Creator: Cronin, Richard P.
Description: This report provides information on and analysis of the current situation in Afghanistan, taking into consideration the country’s essential characteristics and political developments since about the time of the overthrow of the last Afghan King, Zahir Shah, in 1973, and sketches out four possible scenarios for Afghanistan’s future. Finally, the report identifies and analyzes factors that will influence Afghanistan’s political future, and discusses three policy areas in particular in which actions by the United States could be crucial to the achievement of the U.S. goal of a peaceful, stable, democratic, and terrorist-free Afghanistan. An appendix contains key documents relating to the December 2001 Bonn Agreement, which is the framework for current efforts to create a stable and democratic Afghanistan.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan: Challenges and Options for Reconstructing a Stable and Moderate State

Afghanistan: Challenges and Options for Reconstructing a Stable and Moderate State

Date: May 10, 2002
Creator: Cronin, Richard P.
Description: This report provides information on and analysis of the current situation in Afghanistan, taking into consideration the country’s essential characteristics and political developments since about the time of the overthrow of the last Afghan King, Zahir Shah, in 1973, and sketches out four possible scenarios for Afghanistan’s future. Finally, the report identifies and analyzes factors that will influence Afghanistan’s political future, and discusses three policy areas in particular in which actions by the United States could be crucial to the achievement of the U.S. goal of a peaceful, stable, democratic, and terrorist-free Afghanistan. An appendix contains key documents relating to the December 2001 Bonn Agreement, which is the framework for current efforts to create a stable and democratic Afghanistan.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan's Path to Reconstruction: Obstacles, Challenges, and Issues for Congress

Afghanistan's Path to Reconstruction: Obstacles, Challenges, and Issues for Congress

Date: May 17, 2002
Creator: Margesson, Rhoda
Description: Once hostilities end in Afghanistan and the Afghan phase of the war on terrorism starts to wind down, reconstruction efforts will begin in earnest. International attention will likely turn to Afghanistan’s short- and medium-term future, raising questions between the United States and its allies about division of labor, burdensharing, and exit strategies. It is anticipated that Congress will examine reconstruction efforts underway, aid priorities, long-term reconstruction proposals, and the implementation role to be played by the United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan: Current Issues and U.S. Policy Concerns

Afghanistan: Current Issues and U.S. Policy Concerns

Date: May 20, 2002
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: The United States and its allies are helping Afghanistan emerging from more than 22 years of warfare, although substantial risk to Afghan stability remains. Before the U.S. military campaign against the orthodox Islamist Taliban movement began on October 7, 2001, Afghanistan had been mired in conflict since the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979. The defeat of the Taliban has enabled the United States and its coalition partners to send forces throughout Afghanistan to search for Taliban and Al Qaeda fighters and leaders that remain at large, including Osama bin Laden. As the war against remaining Al Qaeda and Taliban elements winds down, the United States is shifting its military focus toward stabilizing the interim government, including training a new Afghan national army, and supporting the international security force (ISAF) that is helping the new government provide security.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 4 5 NEXT LAST