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 Country: Saudi Arabia
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Saudi Arabia: Current Issues and U.S. Relations
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Saudi Arabia: Current Issues and U.S. Relations
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Saudi Arabia: Current Issues and U.S. Relations
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Saudi Arabia: Current Issues and U.S. Relations
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Saudi Arabia: Current Issues and U.S. Relations
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Saudi Arabia: Post-War Issues and U.S. Relations
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Saudi Arabia: Post-War Issues and U.S. Relations
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Saudi Arabia: Current Issues and U.S. Relations
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Saudi Arabia: Current Issues and U.S. Relations
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Saudi Arabia: Current Issues and U.S. Relations
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Saudi Arabia: Current Issues and U.S. Relations
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Saudi Arabia: Terrorist Financing Issues
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Saudi Arabia: Terrorist Financing Issues
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Saudi Arabia: Terrorist Financing Issues
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Saudi Arabia: Terrorist Financing Issues
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Saudi Arabia: Current Issues and U.S. Relations
The United States and Saudi Arabia have long-standing economic and defense ties, and the U.S. has a strong security commitment to Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia was a key member of the allied coalition that expelled Iraqi forces from Kuwait in 1991. Bombing attacks against several U.S. and foreign-operated installations in Saudi Arabia have raised some concerns about security of U.S. citizens and what appears to be growing anti-Americanism in some segments of the Saudi population. Other principal issues of bilateral interest include security in the post-war Gulf region, the Saudi position on the Arab-Israeli conflict, arms transfers to Saudi Arabia, Saudi external aid programs, bilateral trade relationships and oil production, and Saudi policies on human rights and democracy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10310/
Saudi Arabia: Current Issues and U.S. Relations
The United States and Saudi Arabia have long-standing economic and defense ties, and the U.S. has a strong security commitment to Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia was a key member of the allied coalition that expelled Iraqi forces from Kuwait in 1991. Bombing attacks against several U.S. and foreign-operated installations in Saudi Arabia have raised some concerns about security of U.S. citizens and what appears to be growing anti-Americanism in some segments of the Saudi population. Other principal issues of bilateral interest include security in the post-war Gulf region, the Saudi position on the Arab-Israeli conflict, arms transfers to Saudi Arabia, Saudi external aid programs, bilateral trade relationships and oil production, and Saudi policies on human rights and democracy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10311/
World Oil Production After Year 2000: Business As Usual or Crises?
Deficient productive capacity has not yet caused an oil crisis, but that does not mean it never will. Significant increases in world oil demand will have to be met primarily from Persian Gulf supplies. This is a region with a history of wars, illegal occupations, soups, revolutions, sabotage, terrorism, and oil embargoes. To these possibilities may be added growing Islamist movements with various antipathies to the West. If oil production were constrained, oil prices could rise abruptly along with adverse world economic repercussions. If the IEA and EIA are correct on the demand side, deficient world oil productive capacity could cause an oil crisis within 15 years and political disruptions in Saudi Arabia could cause one sooner. However, if the increases in world oil demand were more moderate, and there is long-term relative peace in the Middle East, with increasing foreign participation in upstream oil activities, a business as usual world oil demand and supply situation would be a likely scenario for much of the next century. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs191/
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