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 Country: Afghanistan
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Afghanistan:  Presidential and Parliamentary Elections

Afghanistan: Presidential and Parliamentary Elections

Date: April 8, 2005
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: Presidential elections in Afghanistan were held on October 9, 2004, with heavy turnout and minimal violence. Karzai was declared the winner on November 3, 2004 with about 55% of the vote. Parliamentary, provincial, and district elections were to be held in April-May 2005, but parliamentary and provincial elections are now to be held September 18, 2005; district elections are put off until 2006. See CRS Report RL30588, Afghanistan: Post-War Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan:  Presidential and Parliamentary Elections

Afghanistan: Presidential and Parliamentary Elections

Date: July 7, 2005
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: Presidential elections were held on October 9, 2004, with heavy turnout and minimal violence. Karzai won with about 55% of the vote. In a climate of escalating insurgent violence in Afghanistan, parliamentary and provincial elections are to be held on September 18, 2005; district elections are put off until 2006. See CRS Report RL30588, Afghanistan: Post-War Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan:  Presidential and Parliamentary Elections

Afghanistan: Presidential and Parliamentary Elections

Date: March 10, 2005
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: Presidential elections in Afghanistan were held on October 9, 2004, with heavy turnout and minimal violence. Karzai was declared the winner on November 3, 2004 with about 55% of the vote, and he subsequently named a cabinet incorporating most major factions but stressing qualifications. Parliamentary, provincial, and district elections were to be held in April-May 2005, but they are now almost certain to be postponed until at least September 2005. See CRS Report RL30588, Afghanistan: Post-War Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan: Presidential and Parliamentary Elections

Afghanistan: Presidential and Parliamentary Elections

Date: July 7, 2005
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: Presidential elections were held on October 9, 2004, with heavy turnout and minimal violence. Karzai won with about 55% of the vote. In a climate of escalating insurgent violence in Afghanistan, parliamentary and provincial elections are to be held on September 18, 2005; district elections are put off until 2006. See CRS Report RL30588, Afghanistan: Post-War Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Islamist Militancy in the Pakistan-Afghanistan Border Region and U.S. Policy

Islamist Militancy in the Pakistan-Afghanistan Border Region and U.S. Policy

Date: November 21, 2008
Creator: Kronstadt, K. Alan & Katzman, Kenneth
Description: Increasing militant activity in western Pakistan poses three key national security threats: an increased potential for major attacks against the United States itself; a growing threat to Pakistani stability; and a hindrance of U.S. efforts to stabilize Afghanistan. This report addresses this issue at length. It also describes the recent upsurge of militant activity on the Pakistani side of the Pakistan-Afghanistan border, as well as the general political climates of Pakistan and Afghanistan and their relationships with the United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan's Path to Reconstruction: Obstacles, Challenges, and Issues for Congress

Afghanistan's Path to Reconstruction: Obstacles, Challenges, and Issues for Congress

Date: April 8, 2002
Creator: Margesson, Rhoda
Description: Once hostilities end in Afghanistan and the Afghan phase of the war on terrorism starts to wind down, reconstruction efforts will begin in earnest. International attention will likely turn to Afghanistan’s short- and medium-term future, raising questions between the United States and its allies about division of labor, burdensharing, and exit strategies. It is anticipated that Congress will examine reconstruction efforts underway, aid priorities, long-term reconstruction proposals, and the implementation role to be played by the United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan's Path to Reconstruction: Obstacles, Challenges, and Issues for Congress

Afghanistan's Path to Reconstruction: Obstacles, Challenges, and Issues for Congress

Date: September 20, 2002
Creator: Margesson, Rhoda
Description: Although hostilities in Afghanistan have not yet ended and the war on terrorism in Afghanistan continues, relief and reconstruction efforts to assist the people of Afghanistan are well underway. International attention has mostly focused on Afghanistan’s short- and medium-term future. While questions continue between the United States and its allies about division of labor, burdensharing, and exit strategies, Congress continues to examine the assistance progress, aid priorities, long-term reconstruction proposals, and the implementation role to be played by the United States. Furthermore, Congress considers the FY2003 funding for Afghanistan inadequate and is calling for significantly higher appropriations. A brief overview of the current situation provides a snapshot of the progress to date and the many challenges that lie ahead.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan's Path to Reconstruction: Obstacles, Challenges, and Issues for Congress

Afghanistan's Path to Reconstruction: Obstacles, Challenges, and Issues for Congress

Date: May 17, 2002
Creator: Margesson, Rhoda
Description: Once hostilities end in Afghanistan and the Afghan phase of the war on terrorism starts to wind down, reconstruction efforts will begin in earnest. International attention will likely turn to Afghanistan’s short- and medium-term future, raising questions between the United States and its allies about division of labor, burdensharing, and exit strategies. It is anticipated that Congress will examine reconstruction efforts underway, aid priorities, long-term reconstruction proposals, and the implementation role to be played by the United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA): What Is It, and How Has It Been Utilized?

Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA): What Is It, and How Has It Been Utilized?

Date: March 15, 2012
Creator: Mason, Chuck R.
Description: The deadly attacks on Afghan civilians allegedly by a U.S. service member have raised questions regarding the Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA) in place between the United States and Afghanistan that would govern whether Afghan law would apply in this circumstance. In the case of Afghanistan, the SOFA, in force since 2003, provides that U.S. Department of Defense military and civilian personnel are to be accorded status equivalent to that of U.S. Embassy administrative and technical staff under the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic relations of 1961. Accordingly, U.S. personnel are immune from criminal prosecution by Afghan authorities and are immune from civil and administrative jurisdiction except with respect to acts performed outside the course of their duties. Under the existing SOFA, the United States would have jurisdiction over the prosecution of the service member who allegedly attacked the Afghan civilians.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
NATO in Afghanistan: A Test of the Transatlantic Alliance

NATO in Afghanistan: A Test of the Transatlantic Alliance

Date: July 2, 2009
Creator: Morelli, Vincent & Belkin, Paul
Description: This report discusses the mission of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in Afghanistan, the purpose of which is to stabilize and reconstruct Afghanistan by combating emerging threats such as terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. This report also discusses how the Obama Administration has made the Afghanistan conflict a policy priority, and what this stance could mean for potential future endeavors.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department