You limited your search to:

 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Central Asia's New States: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia's New States: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: May 18, 2001
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics and established diplomatic relations with each by mid-March 1992. This report provides an overview of U.S. policy concerns after the Soviet collapse. The report presents the U.S. policy attention and aid to support conflict amelioration, humanitarian needs, economic development, transport (including energy pipelines) and communications, border controls, democracy, and the creation of civil societies in the South Caucasian and Central Asian states. The United States has some economic and business interests in Central Asia, particularly in oil and natural gas development in Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Central Asia's New States: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia's New States: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: August 30, 2002
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics and established diplomatic relations with each by mid-March 1992. This report provides an overview of U.S. policy concerns after the Soviet collapse. The report presents the U.S. policy attention and aid to support conflict amelioration, humanitarian needs, economic development, transport (including energy pipelines) and communications, border controls, democracy, and the creation of civil societies in the South Caucasian and Central Asian states. The United States has some economic and business interests in Central Asia, particularly in oil and natural gas development in Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Central Asia's New States: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia's New States: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: October 4, 2002
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics and established diplomatic relations with each by mid-March 1992. This report provides an overview of U.S. policy concerns after the Soviet collapse. The report presents the U.S. policy attention and aid to support conflict amelioration, humanitarian needs, economic development, transport (including energy pipelines) and communications, border controls, democracy, and the creation of civil societies in the South Caucasian and Central Asian states. The United States has some economic and business interests in Central Asia, particularly in oil and natural gas development in Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Central Asia's New States: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia's New States: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: November 7, 2002
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics and established diplomatic relations with each by mid-March 1992. This report provides an overview of U.S. policy concerns after the Soviet collapse. The report presents the U.S. policy attention and aid to support conflict amelioration, humanitarian needs, economic development, transport (including energy pipelines) and communications, border controls, democracy, and the creation of civil societies in the South Caucasian and Central Asian states. The United States has some economic and business interests in Central Asia, particularly in oil and natural gas development in Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Central Asia's New States: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia's New States: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: December 11, 2002
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics and established diplomatic relations with each by mid-March 1992. This report provides an overview of U.S. policy concerns after the Soviet collapse. The report presents the U.S. policy attention and aid to support conflict amelioration, humanitarian needs, economic development, transport (including energy pipelines) and communications, border controls, democracy, and the creation of civil societies in the South Caucasian and Central Asian states. The United States has some economic and business interests in Central Asia, particularly in oil and natural gas development in Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Central Asia's New States: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia's New States: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: March 31, 2000
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics and established diplomatic relations with each by mid-March 1992. This report provides an overview of U.S. policy concerns after the Soviet collapse. The report presents the U.S. policy attention and aid to support conflict amelioration, humanitarian needs, economic development, transport (including energy pipelines) and communications, border controls, democracy, and the creation of civil societies in the South Caucasian and Central Asian states. The United States has some economic and business interests in Central Asia, particularly in oil and natural gas development in Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Central Asia's New States: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia's New States: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: July 20, 2005
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics and established diplomatic relations with each by mid-March 1992. This report provides an overview of U.S. policy concerns after the Soviet collapse. The report presents the U.S. policy attention and aid to support conflict amelioration, humanitarian needs, economic development, transport (including energy pipelines) and communications, border controls, democracy, and the creation of civil societies in the South Caucasian and Central Asian states. The United States has some economic and business interests in Central Asia, particularly in oil and natural gas development in Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Central Asia's Security: Issues and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia's Security: Issues and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: unknown
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: This report discusses the internal and external security concerns of the Central Asian states. Security concerns faced by the states include mixes of social disorder, crime, corruption, terrorism, ethnic and civil conflict, border tensions, water and transport disputes, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), and trafficking in illegal narcotics and persons.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Central Asia's Security: Issues and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia's Security: Issues and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: February 25, 2009
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: This report discusses the internal and external security concerns of the Central Asian states. Security concerns faced by the states include mixes of social disorder, crime, corruption, terrorism, ethnic and civil conflict, border tensions, water and transport disputes, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), and trafficking in illegal narcotics and persons.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Chechnya Conflict: Recent Developments

Chechnya Conflict: Recent Developments

Date: May 3, 2000
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: This report examines military airstrikes and ground operations that Russia launched against its Chechnya region in late September 1999. It provides background information on earlier Chechen guerrilla attacks on the neighboring Dagestan region of Russia and on the unsolved terrorist bombing of several apartment buildings in Russia. Current problems of governance in Chechnya are discussed, as well as Chechnya’s response to the Russian offensive. The concerns of the United States and other Western governments about the conflict are examined. A map is included. This report supersedes CRS Report RS20358, Chechnya Conflict.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department