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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Early Childhood Education: Preschool Participation, Program Efficacy, and Federal Policy Issues
This report examines what we currently know about preprimary programs, including numbers of children served and their family characteristics; as well as data on the efficacy of preprimary programs in enhancing later learning and other life skills. Current federal programs that serve preschool age children are described, and policy issues which may arise as the federal role in early childhood education is debated are discussed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc463059/
Early Childhood Education: Preschool Participation, Program Efficacy, and Federal Policy Issues
This report examines what we currently know about preprimary programs, including numbers of children served and their family characteristics; as well as data on the efficacy of preprimary programs in enhancing later learning and other life skills. It also discusses federal programs that serve preschool age children are described, and policy issues which may arise as the federal role in early childhood education. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc824559/
Parental Kidnapping
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8598/
Population Assistance and Family Planning Programs: Issues for Congress
This report discusses the U.S. population assistance issues, policy issues in the U.S. family planning debate, and U.S. funding levels. This policy, has generated contentious debate for over two decades, resulting in frequent clarification and modification of U.S. international family planning programs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc822570/
International Population Assistance and Family Planning Programs: Issues for Congress
Since 1965, United States policy has supported international population planning based on principles of volunteerism and informed choice that gives participants access to information on all methods of birth control. This policy, however, has generated contentious debate for over two decades, resulting in frequent clarification and modification of U.S. international family planning programs. This report provides the context of this debate. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10831/
International Population Assistance and Family Planning Programs: Issues for Congress
This report examines issues surrounding the debate on family planning, which is at times the most contentious foreign aid issue considered by Congress. The cornerstone of U.S. policy has remained a commitment to international family planning programs based on principles of volunteerism and informed choice that give participants access to information on all major methods of birth control. At present, USAID maintains family planning projects in more than 60 countries that include counseling and services, training of health workers, contraceptive supplies and distribution, financial management, public education and marketing, and biomedical and contraceptive research and development. USAID applies a broad reproductive health approach to its family planning programs, increasingly integrating it with other interventions regarding maternal and child health, the enhancement of the status of women, and HIV prevention and transmission. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc809452/
IRS Reform: Innocent Spouse Rule
Married couples filing joint tax returns are liable individually and as a couple for all taxes due on the return with a limited exemption for innocent spouses. This report discusses joint and several liability, which has been the subject of much criticism and calls for reform or elimination. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs791/
IRS Reform: Innocent Spouse Rule
Married couples filing joint tax returns are liable individually and as a couple for all taxes due on the return with a limited exemption for innocent spouses. This report discusses joint and several liability, which has been the subject of much criticism and calls for reform or elimination. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc820985/
Veterans' Benefits: Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) for Survivors
This report outlines the eligibility requirements and benefit levels for Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) and related policy issues. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc463257/
Veterans' Benefits: Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) for Survivors
This report outlines the eligibility requirements and benefit levels for Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) and related policy issues. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc689221/
Veterans' Benefits: Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) for Survivors
This report outlines the eligibility requirements and benefit levels for Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) and related policy issues. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc103064/
Veterans' Benefits: Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) for Survivors
This report outlines the eligibility requirements and benefit levels for Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) and related policy issues. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc227651/
The Family and Medical Leave Act: Background and U.S. Supreme Court Cases
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7763/
Parental Notification and Ayotte v. Planned Parenthood of Northern New England
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7986/
Same-Sex Marriages: Legal Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6564/
Same-Sex Marriages: Legal Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6565/
Same-Sex Marriages: Legal Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6394/
Same-Sex Marriages: Legal Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5901/
Same-Sex Marriages: Legal Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8004/
Same-Sex Marriages: Legal Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8030/
Family Law: Congress's Authority to Legislate on Domestic Relations Questions
This report discusses the extent to which Congress is constitutionally authorized to legislate on family law questions, and includes examples of present laws utilizing the various approaches available in this area. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc505369/
International Parental Child Abductions
This report discusses the applicability of the Hague Convention and current U.S. laws, both civil and criminal, which seek to address the quandary of children abducted by parents to foreign nations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc463074/
International Parental Child Abductions
This report discusses the applicability of the Hague Convention and current U.S. laws, both civil and criminal, which seek to address the quandary of children abducted by a parent to foreign nations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc627198/
International Parental Child Abductions
International child custody disputes are likely to increase in frequency as the global society becomes more integrated and mobile. Since 1988, the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction ("Hague Convention" or "Convention") has been the principal mechanism for enforcing the return of abducted children to the United States. This report will discuss the applicability of the Hague Convention and current U.S. laws, both civil and criminal, which seek to address the quandary of children abducted by parents to foreign nations. In addition, pending legislation, including H.R. 3240 and H.R. 3487, is discussed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31443/
Same-Sex Marriages: Legal Issues
This report discusses Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and legal challenges to it. It reviews legal principles applied to determine the validity of a marriage contracted in another state and surveys the various approaches employed by states to enable or to prevent same-sex marriage. The report also examines House and Senate resolutions introduced in previous Congresses proposing a constitutional amendment and limiting federal courts' jurisdiction to hear or determine any question pertaining to the interpretation of DOMA. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc87267/
Same-Sex Marriages: Legal Issues
The recognition of same-sex marriages generates debate on both the federal and state levels. Variations in state law on the issue raise questions about the validity of such unions outside the contracted jurisdiction and have bearing on the distribution of federal benefits. This report discusses the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and it's legal challenges. It reviews legal principles applied to determine the validity of a marriage contracted in another state and surveys the various approaches employed by states to enable or to prevent same-sex marriage. The report also examines House and Senate resolutions introduced in previous Congresses proposing a constitutional amendment and limiting federal courts' jurisdiction to hear or determine any question pertaining to the interpretation of DOMA. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc85446/
Child Support Enforcement
During the first session of the 98th Congress, the House passed H.R. 4325, 422-0. This measure requires States to adopt several methods of enforcing overdue child support obligations, including mandatory wage withholding; requires States to permit establishment of paternity until a child's 18th birthday; alters the incentive payment formula for child support collections; and extends the formula to collections made on behalf of non-AFDC children. The report includes background and policy analysis. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8713/
Child Support Enforcement: $25 Annual User Fee
This report discusses the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program, which was enacted in 1975 as a federal-state program to help strengthen families by securing financial support for children from their noncustodial parent on a consistent and continuing basis and by helping some families to remain self-sufficient and off public assistance by providing the requisite CSE services. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc821505/
Child Support Enforcement: New Reforms and Potential Issues
P.L. 104-193 (the 1996 welfare reform legislation) made major changes to the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program. Some of the changes include requiring states to increase the percentage of fathers identified, establishing an integrated, automated network linking all states to information about the location and assets of parents, and requiring states to implement more enforcement techniques to obtain collections from debtor parents. Additional legislative changes were made in 1997, 1998, and 1999, but not in 2000, 2001, or 2002. This report describes several aspects of the revised CSE program and discusses three issues that probably will be reexamined by the 108th Congress — CSE financing, parental access by noncustodial parents, and distribution of support payments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc820962/
Child Support Enforcement: New Reforms and Potential Issues
P.L. 104-193 (the 1996 welfare reform legislation) made major changes to the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program. Some of the changes include requiring states to increase the percentage of fathers identified, establishing an integrated, automated network linking all states to information about the location and assets of parents, and requiring states to implement more enforcement techniques to obtain collections from debtor parents. Additional legislative changes were made in 1997, 1998, and 1999, but not in 2000. This report describes several aspects of the revised CSE program and discusses three issues that probably will be reexamined by the 107th Congress — CSE financing, parental access by noncustodial parents, and distribution of support payments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc809226/
Child Support Enforcement: New Reforms and Potential Issues
P.L. 104-193 (the 1996 welfare reform legislation) made major changes to the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program. Some of the changes include requiring states to increase the percentage of fathers identified, establishing an integrated, automated network linking all states to information about the location and assets of parents, and requiring states to implement more enforcement techniques to obtain collections from debtor parents. Additional legislative changes were made in 1997, 1998, and 1999, but not in 2000, 2001, 2002, or 2003. This report describes several aspects of the revised CSE program and discusses three issues that probably will be reexamined by the 108th Congress — CSE financing, parental access by noncustodial parents, and distribution of support payments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc811434/
Child Support Enforcement: New Reforms and Potential Issues
P.L. 104-193 (the 1996 welfare reform legislation) made major changes to the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program. Some of the changes include requiring states to increase the percentage of fathers identified, establishing an integrated, automated network linking all states to information about the location and assets of parents, and requiring states to implement more enforcement techniques to obtain collections from debtor parents. Additional legislative changes were made in 1997, 1998, and 1999, but not in 2000, 2001, or 2002. This report describes several aspects of the revised CSE program and discusses three issues that probably will be reexamined by the 108th Congress — CSE financing, parental access by noncustodial parents, and distribution of support payments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc810435/
Child Support Enforcement: New Reforms and Potential Issues
P.L. 104-193 (the 1996 welfare reform law) made major changes to the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program. Some of the changes include requiring states to increase the percentage of fathers identified, establishing an integrated, automated network linking all states to information about the location and assets of parents, and requiring states to implement more enforcement techniques to obtain collections from debtor parents. Additional legislative changes were made in 1997, 1998, and 1999, but not in 2000, 2001, 2002, or 2003. This report describes several aspects of the revised CSE program and discusses three issues of concern to the 108th Congress — CSE financing, parental access by noncustodial parents, and distribution of child support payments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc817409/
Child Support Enforcement: New Reforms and Potential Issues
This report describes several aspects of the revised CSE program and discusses three issues that probably will be reexamined by the 107th Congress — CSE financing, parental access by noncustodial parents, and distribution of support payments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2808/
Child Support Enforcement: New Reforms and Potential Issues
P.L. 104-193 (the 1996 welfare reform legislation) made major changes to the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program. Some of the changes include requiring states to increase the percentage of fathers identified, establishing an integrated, automated network linking all states to information about the location and assets of parents, and requiring states to implement more enforcement techniques to obtain collections from debtor parents. Additional legislative changes were made in 1997, 1998, and 1999, but not in 2000, 2001, or 2002. This report describes several aspects of the revised CSE program and discusses three issues that probably will be reexamined by the 108th Congress — CSE financing, parental access by noncustodial parents, and distribution of support payments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc820579/
Child Support Enforcement: New Reforms and Potential Issues
This report describes several aspects of the revised CSE program and discusses three issues that probably will be reexamined by the 107th Congress — CSE financing, parental access by noncustodial parents, and distribution of support payments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2807/
Child Support Enforcement: New Reforms and Potential Issues
This report describes several aspects of the revised CSE program and discusses three issues that probably will be reexamined by the 107th Congress — CSE financing, parental access by noncustodial parents, and distribution of support payments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2806/
Child Support Enforcement: New Reforms and Potential Issues
This report describes several aspects of the revised CSE program and discusses three issues that probably will be reexamined by the 107th Congress — CSE financing, parental access by noncustodial parents, and distribution of support payments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4646/
Child Support Enforcement: New Reforms and Potential Issues
This report describes several aspects of the revised CSE program and discusses three issues that probably will be reexamined by the 107th Congress — CSE financing, parental access by noncustodial parents, and distribution of support payments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4645/
Child Support Enforcement: New Reforms and Potential Issues
This report discusses the background, issues, enforcement and the reforms of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-193), signed into law on August 22, 1996, and the major changes made to the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs680/
Child Support Enforcement: New Reforms and Potential Issues
P.L. 104-193 (the 1996 welfare reform legislation) made major changes to the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program. Some of the changes include requiring states to increase the percentage of fathers identified, establishing an integrated, automated network linking all states to information about the location and assets of parents, and requiring states to implement more enforcement techniques to obtain collections from debtor parents. Additional legislative changes were made in 1997, 1998, and 1999, but not in 2000 or 2001. This report describes several aspects of the revised CSE program and discusses three issues that probably will be reexamined by the 107th Congress — CSE financing, parental access by noncustodial parents, and distribution of support payments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc817389/
The Child Support Enforcement Program
This report provides summary information on the child support enforcement program, established under title IV-D of the Social Security Act. It includes basic program statistics and a description of the administrative structure and major characteristics of the program. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8411/
The Child Support Enforcement Program: A Fact Sheet
This report discusses the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program, Part D of Title IV of the Social Security Act, was enacted in January 1975 (P.L. 93-647). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs679/
Child Support Enforcement: Program Basics
In FY2004, the CSE program collected $21.9 billion in child support payments and served 15.9 million child support cases. However, the program still collects only 18% of child support obligations for which it has responsibility and collects payments for only 51% of its caseload. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8485/
Child Support Provisions Considered But Not Enacted During the 2002-2005 Welfare Reauthorization Debate
Although the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (enacted February 8, 2006) included significant changes to the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program, it did not include many of the child support provisions that had been considered during the preceding four-year debate within the context of welfare reauthorization. This report discusses 12 such provisions that were passed by either the House or the Senate Finance Committee (or both). The Administration has included several of these provisions in its FY2008 budget. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc821514/
Child Support Provisions in the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (P.L. 109-171)
This report discusses the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program and the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (P.L. 109-171). The act will reduce the federal matching rate for laboratory costs associated with paternity establishment from 90% to 66%, end the federal matching of state expenditures of federal CSE incentive payments reinvested back into the program, and require states to assess a $25 annual user fee for child support services provided to families with no connection to the welfare system. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8484/
Fatherhood Initiatives: Connecting Fathers to Their Children
This report discusses "responsible fatherhood" programs that promote the financial and personal responsibility of noncustodial fathers to their children and increase the participation of fathers in the lives of their children. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc505383/
Fatherhood Initiatives: Connecting Fathers to Their Children
This report discusses programs that promote the financial and personal responsibility of noncustodial fathers to their children and increase the participation of fathers in the lives of their children. These programs have come to be known as "responsible fatherhood" programs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc227968/
Medical Child Support: Background and Current Policy
This report describes current federal policy with respect to medical child support. It also examines the potential impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program. It provides a legislative history of medical support provisions in the CSE program and state data on the medical support coverage of children in the CSE program. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc272041/
Nonmarital Childbearing: Trends, Reasons, and Public Policy Interventions
This report analyzes the trends in nonmarital childbearing, discusses some of the characteristics of unwed mothers, addresses some issues involving the fathers of children born outside of marriage, covers many of the reasons for nonmarital childbearing, examines the impact of nonmarital births on families and on the nation, and presents the public policy interventions that have been used to prevent nonmarital births or ameliorate some of the negative financial consequences that are sometimes associated with nonmarital childbearing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc26294/