You limited your search to:

 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Results 14101 - 14150 of 17,216
  |   |  
Should Banking Powers Expand into Real Estate Brokerage and Management?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4671/
Should Banking Powers Expand into Real Estate Brokerage and Management?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4670/
Should Banking Powers Expand into Real Estate Brokerage and Management?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4669/
Should Banking Powers Expand into Real Estate Brokerage and Management?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4668/
Should Banking Powers Expand into Real Estate Brokerage and Management?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2827/
Should Banking Powers Expand into Real Estate Brokerage and Management?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2826/
Terrorism Insurance in the Post September 11 Marketplace
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1721/
Issues in Consumer Bankruptcy Reform Before the 107th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1720/
Issues in Consumer Bankruptcy Reform
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1719/
Consumer Bankruptcy and Household Debt
Financial distress is most common among lower-income families, but its incidence has grown in all income brackets. This trend suggests that explanations for the rise in consumer bankruptcy filings are more likely to be found in micro-analysis of individuals and groups of debtors than in macroeconomic indicators. This report presents statistics on bankruptcy filings, household debt, and households in financial distress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4667/
Consumer Bankruptcy and Household Debt
Financial distress is most common among lower-income families, but its incidence has grown in all income brackets. This trend suggests that explanations for the rise in consumer bankruptcy filings are more likely to be found in micro-analysis of individuals and groups of debtors than in macroeconomic indicators. This report presents statistics on bankruptcy filings, household debt, and households in financial distress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4666/
Consumer Bankruptcy and Household Debt
Financial distress is most common among lower-income families, but its incidence has grown in all income brackets. This trend suggests that explanations for the rise in consumer bankruptcy filings are more likely to be found in micro-analysis of individuals and groups of debtors than in macroeconomic indicators. This report presents statistics on bankruptcy filings, household debt, and households in financial distress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4665/
Consumer Bankruptcy and Household Debt
Financial distress is most common among lower-income families, but its incidence has grown in all income brackets. This trend suggests that explanations for the rise in consumer bankruptcy filings are more likely to be found in micro-analysis of individuals and groups of debtors than in macroeconomic indicators. This report presents statistics on bankruptcy filings, household debt, and households in financial distress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2825/
Consumer Bankruptcy and Household Debt
Financial distress is most common among lower-income families, but its incidence has grown in all income brackets. This trend suggests that explanations for the rise in consumer bankruptcy filings are more likely to be found in micro-analysis of individuals and groups of debtors than in macroeconomic indicators. This report presents statistics on bankruptcy filings, household debt, and households in financial distress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2824/
Federal Deposit and Share Insurance: Proposals for Change
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4664/
Federal Deposit and Share Insurance: Proposals for Change
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4663/
Federal Deposit and Share Insurance: Proposals for Change
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4662/
Federal Deposit and Share Insurance: Proposals for Change
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4661/
Federal Deposit and Share Insurance: Proposals for Change
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2823/
Federal Deposit and Share Insurance: Proposals for Change
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2822/
Federal Deposit and Share Insurance: Proposals for Change
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2820/
H.R. 2415: Bankruptcy Reform in the Closing Days of the 106th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1718/
Derivatives Regulation: Legislation in the 106th Congress
The 106th Congress is considering a general overhaul of derivatives regulation. Pending legislation would codify the unregulated status of certain derivatives, exempt many other currently-regulated contracts from oversight by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, and permit the trading of a new kind of contract: a futures contract based on the stock of an individual corporation. Derivatives legislation has been reported out of committee in both House and Senate. This report analyzes this legislation in the 106th Congress, and will be updated as developments warrant. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1223/
Securities Law: Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and Selected 108th Congress Bills Concerning Corporate Accountability
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4660/
Bankruptcy Reform in the 108th Congress
On March 19, 2003, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 975, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2003. H.R. 975, as introduced, was substantially similar to the legislation (H.R. 333) approved by both the House and the Senate during the 107th Congress, but omitted the Schumer Amendment which would have prevented the discharge of liability for willful violation of protective orders and violent protests against providers of “lawful services,” including reproductive health services. As passed by the House, H.R. 975 was amended to add sections to, among other things, increase the cap on wage and employee benefit claims. The Senate did not consider H.R. 975 during the first session of the 108th Congress. This report provides an overview of selected major provisions of the legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5902/
Bankruptcy Reform in the 108th Congress
On March 19, 2003, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 975, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2003. H.R. 975, as introduced, was substantially similar to the legislation (H.R. 333) approved by both the House and the Senate during the 107th Congress, but omitted the Schumer Amendment which would have prevented the discharge of liability for willful violation of protective orders and violent protests against providers of “lawful services,” including reproductive health services. As passed by the House, H.R. 975 was amended to add sections to, among other things, increase the cap on wage and employee benefit claims. The Senate did not consider H.R. 975 during the first session of the 108th Congress. This report provides an overview of selected major provisions of the legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4659/
Bankruptcy Reform in the 108th Congress
On March 19, 2003, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 975, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2003. H.R. 975, as introduced, was substantially similar to the legislation (H.R. 333) approved by both the House and the Senate during the 107th Congress, but omitted the Schumer Amendment which would have prevented the discharge of liability for willful violation of protective orders and violent protests against providers of “lawful services,” including reproductive health services. As passed by the House, H.R. 975 was amended to add sections to, among other things, increase the cap on wage and employee benefit claims. The Senate did not consider H.R. 975 during the first session of the 108th Congress. This report provides an overview of selected major provisions of the legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4658/
Bankruptcy Reform in the 108th Congress
On February 27, 2003, House Judiciary Chairman James Sensenbrenner introduced H.R. 975, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2003. Subcommittee hearings were held on March 4, and the legislation was marked-up and ordered to be reported by the full committee on March 12. This report provides an overview of selected major provisions of the legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4657/
Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue
If all checks were replaced by electronic transactions, the exact cost savings would still be unknown, because estimates of the cost of using a check and the number of checks written each year remain in dispute. Consequently, estimates of cost savings range from $1.4 billion annually for truncation alone to $68 billion for replacing checks with electronic payments. A significant part of the savings comes from eliminating the handling, sorting, and physically transporting of checks to the paying bank. To clear checks electronically, banks must negotiate processing agreements thatmake it unnecessary to physically present the paper check. Since the benefits are not uniformly dispersed among the participants, banks have found it difficult to obtain these agreements, thus constraining the widespread adoption of electronic check clearing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4656/
Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue
If all checks were replaced by electronic transactions, the exact cost savings would still be unknown, because estimates of the cost of using a check and the number of checks written each year remain in dispute. Consequently, estimates of cost savings range from $1.4 billion annually for truncation alone to $68 billion for replacing checks with electronic payments. A significant part of the savings comes from eliminating the handling, sorting, and physically transporting of checks to the paying bank. To clear checks electronically, banks must negotiate processing agreements thatmake it unnecessary to physically present the paper check. Since the benefits are not uniformly dispersed among the participants, banks have found it difficult to obtain these agreements, thus constraining the widespread adoption of electronic check clearing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4655/
Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue
If all checks were replaced by electronic transactions, the exact cost savings would still be unknown, because estimates of the cost of using a check and the number of checks written each year remain in dispute. Consequently, estimates of cost savings range from $1.4 billion annually for truncation alone to $68 billion for replacing checks with electronic payments. A significant part of the savings comes from eliminating the handling, sorting, and physically transporting of checks to the paying bank. To clear checks electronically, banks must negotiate processing agreements thatmake it unnecessary to physically present the paper check. Since the benefits are not uniformly dispersed among the participants, banks have found it difficult to obtain these agreements, thus constraining the widespread adoption of electronic check clearing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4653/
Employer Stock in Retirement Plans: Investment Risk and Retirement Security
This CRS Report begins by describing the shift from traditional defined benefit pensions to defined contribution plans – like the 401(k) – that has occurred over the last 20 to 25 years. It then summarizes recent research findings on the extent to which employees’ retirement savings are invested in employer stock. The third section of the report outlines the provisions of federal law that define an employer’s duty to manage its retirement plan in the best interest of the plan’s participants. The report concludes with a summary of pension reform legislation passed by the House of Representatives in April 2002 and a description of several pension reform bills that have been introduced in the Senate in 2002. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4654/
Employer Stock in Retirement Plans: Investment Risk and Retirement Security
This CRS Report begins by describing the shift from traditional defined benefit pensions to defined contribution plans – like the 401(k) – that has occurred over the last 20 to 25 years. It then summarizes recent research findings on the extent to which employees’ retirement savings are invested in employer stock. The third section of the report outlines the provisions of federal law that define an employer’s duty to manage its retirement plan in the best interest of the plan’s participants. The report concludes with a summary of pension reform legislation passed by the House of Representatives in April 2002 and a description of several pension reform bills that have been introduced in the Senate in 2002. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2821/
The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002: A Side-by-Side Comparison of House, Senate, and Conference Versions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2819/
Auditing and Accounting Reform Proposals: A Side-by-Side Comparison
This report compares the major provisions of three auditor and accounting reform proposals: two versions of H.R. 3763 (as passed by the House on April 24, 2002, and by the Senate on July 15, 2002), and proposed rules that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) published on June 26th under its existing authority. H.R. 3763, in its House and Senate versions, and the SEC proposal seek to restore confidence in corporate reporting by enhancing the oversight of financial accounting. All three proposals would create a new oversight body to regulate independent auditors (whose certification the law requires to be affixed to the annual reports of all publicly traded corporations). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2818/
Employer Stock in Retirement Plans: Bills in the 107th Congress
In the wake of the bankruptcy of Enron Corporation, numerous bills have been introduced in the 107th Congress with the intent of protecting workers from the financial losses that employees risk when they invest a large proportion of their retirement savings in securities issued by their employers. Legislative proposals include some that would directly regulate the proportion of employees’ retirement savings that can be comprised of employer securities, and others that would encourage education of employees on financial matters without imposing a cap on employee investment in employer securities. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2817/
Enron: Selected Securities, Accounting, and Pension Laws Possibly Implicated in its Collapse
This report takes a brief look at some of the federal statutes concerning finance that the Congress and the Executive branch may focus on in their investigations. The report considers three major areas: the federal securities laws, the federal pension laws, and accounting standards. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2816/
Terrorism Risk Insurance: A Summary of Legislative Proposals
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1717/
Insurance Exclusion Clauses: Excluding War Risks and Terror Risks from Insurance Contracts
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1716/
Bankruptcy Reform Legislation in the 107th Congress: A Comparison of H.R. 333 As Passed by the House and the Senate
H.R. 333, 107th Congress, 1st Sess. (2001), the “Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2001” and its counterpart in the Senate, S. 220, 107th Congress, 1st Sess. (2001), the “Bankruptcy Reform Act of 2001” were introduced on January 31, 2001. So far, the 107th Congress has demonstrated widespread support for the bills evidenced by the votes. Although President Bush is expected to sign bankruptcy reform into law, the White House has indicated that a bankruptcy bill that contains a federal homestead cap may be unacceptable. This report surveys the bills and the major amendments that have been adopted. It provides a sectional analysis comparing selected provisions, with an emphasis on consumer bankruptcy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2815/
U.S. Taxation of Overseas Investment
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2814/
U.S. Taxation of Overseas Investment
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2813/
Tax-Exempt Bonds: A Description of State and Local Government Debt
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1715/
Mergers and Consolidation Between Banking and Financial Services Firms: Trends and Prospects
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2812/
Mergers and Consolidation Between Banking and Financial Services Firms: Trends and Prospects
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2811/
Mergers and Consolidation Between Banking and Financial Services Firms: Trends and Prospects
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4652/
Mergers and Consolidation Between Banking and Financial Services Firms: Trends and Prospects
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4651/
Electricity Restructuring and Tax-Exempt Bonds: Economic Analysis of Legislative Proposals
Tax-exempt bonds reduce public power's interest cost on debt and enable it to lower the price of electricity. This subsidy makes taxpayers better off only if the private market fails to provide the correct amount of electricity. In general, the private market can provide the correct amount of electricity; in those cases when it can not, the tax-exempt bond subsidy is unlikely to correct the problem. Tax-exempt bond legislation has been consistent with this perspective that an interest subsidy for electricity production does not correct a market failure; its focus has been to prohibit the spread of subsidized public power beyond its traditional service areas. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1222/
Global Financial Turmoil, the IMF, and the New Financial Architecture
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1714/
Global Financial Turmoil, the IMF, and the New Financial Architecture
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1221/