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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Conventional Warheads for Long-Range Ballistic Missiles: Background and Issues for Congress
This report provides an overview of the Administration’s rationale for the possible deployment of conventional warheads on long-range ballistic missiles. It then reviews the Air Force and Navy efforts to develop these systems. It summarizes congressional reaction to these proposals, then provides a more detailed account of the issues raised by these concepts and programs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8346/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5667/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5668/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5669/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5666/
North Korea's Nuclear Weapons: How Soon an Arsenal?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5705/
Nuclear Earth Penetrator Weapons
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5702/
U.S. Arms Sales: Agreements with and Deliveries to Major Clients, 1997-2004
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8055/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5670/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5694/
Project BioShield
Many potential biological terrorism agents lack available countermeasures. President Bush proposed Project BioShield to address this need and signed into law on July 21, 2004 S. 15 (The Project BioShield Act of 2004). The main provisions of this law include (1) relaxing procedures for bioterrorism-related procurement, hiring, and awarding of research grants; (2) guaranteeing a federal government market for new biomedical countermeasures; and (3) permitting emergency use of unapproved countermeasures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10250/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention's implementation. Chemical Weapons Convention implementing legislation, as S. 610, passed the Senate unanimously on May 23, 1997. This legislation, which was an amendment in the nature of a substitute reported from the Judiciary Committee, provides the statutory authority for domestic compliance with the Convention's provisions. It sets criminal and civil penalties for the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, transfer, possession, or use of chemical weapons. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2055/
China's Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles: Current Policy Issues
This report provides a brief background analysis and recent developments regarding China’s Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles. The report includes topics such as: Recent Proliferation Transfers, chemical, nuclear, and missile technology sales to Iran, Pakistan, Libya, Syria, trade controls, nonproliferation and arms control. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2052/
China's Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles: Current Policy Issues
This report provides a brief background analysis and recent developments regarding China’s Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles. The report includes topics such as: Recent Proliferation Transfers, chemical, nuclear, and missile technology sales to Iran, Pakistan, Libya, Syria, trade controls, nonproliferation and arms control. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2051/
U.S. Arms Sales: Agreements with and Deliveries to Major Clients, 1996-2003
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6107/
North Korea's Nuclear Weapons: How Soon an Arsenal?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6109/
Chinese Missile and Nuclear Proliferation: Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs276/
Chinese Missile and Nuclear Proliferation: Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs274/
North Korea's Nuclear Weapons: How Soon an Arsenal?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6813/
V-22 Osprey Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2049/
U.S. Nuclear Weapons: Changes in Policy and Force Structure
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6095/
Nuclear Warhead "Pit" Production: Background and Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6097/
Missile Survey: Ballistic and Cruise Missiles of Foreign Countries
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6093/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6539/
U.S. Nuclear Weapons: Changes in Policy and Force Structure
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6343/
Chinese Missile and Nuclear Proliferation: Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs275/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6593/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6714/
Navy Littoral Combat Ship (LCS): Background and Issues for Congress
The Navy's proposed FY2007 budget requests $521 million to procure two Littoral Combat Ships (LCSs). The House-reported version of the FY2007 defense appropriations bill recommends approval of this request. The Senate-reported version recommends funding one LCS in FY2007 and rescinding funding for one of the three LCSs procured in FY2006. For a longer discussion of the LCS program, see CRS Report RL32109, Navy DDG-1000 (DD(X)), CG(X), and LCS Ship Acquisition Programs: Oversight Issues and Options for Congress, by Ronald O'Rourke. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10258/
Project BioShield
Many potential biological terrorism agents lack available countermeasures. President Bush proposed Project BioShield to address this need and signed into law on July 21, 2004 S. 15 (The Project BioShield Act of 2004). The main provisions of this law include (1) relaxing procedures for bioterrorism-related procurement, hiring, and awarding of research grants; (2) guaranteeing a federal government market for new biomedical countermeasures; and (3) permitting emergency use of unapproved countermeasures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10251/
Electric-Drive Propulsion for U.S. Navy Ships: Background and Issues for Congress
This report provides background information and discusses issues for Congress regarding the use of electric-drive propulsion technology (as opposed to traditional mechanical-drive technology) on U.S. Navy ships. As a result of technological developments over the last few years, electric-drive technology has matured to the point where the Navy has selected it for use on its planned next-generation DD-21 land-attack destroyer and is considering it for use on other kinds of Navy ships as well. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1322/
V-22 Osprey Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6340/
Cost Overruns in Major Weapon Systems: Current Dimensions of a Longstanding Problem
This paper reviews the initiatives of the Reagan Administration to control cost overruns during the last 2 and a half years and the actions taken by the Congress to strengthen its oversight role. Particular attention is directed at the critical need to enhance management incentive and accountability at all level of the acquisition process. If recently instituted reform in the Department of Defense fail to control cost overruns, pressure may grow for a more sweeping and radical approach. Serious consideration in such an event might even be given to removing responsibility for weapons acquisition management for the military service and assigning it to a civilian-operated supply agency. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8806/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9923/
Conventional Warheads for Long-Range Ballistic Missiles: Background and Issues for Congress
This report provides an overview of the Administration’s rationale for the possible deployment of conventional warheads on long-range ballistic missiles. It then reviews the Air Force and Navy efforts to develop these systems. It summarizes congressional reaction to these proposals, then provides a more detailed account of the issues raised by these concepts and programs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9402/
V-22 Osprey Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9766/
Brazilian Trade Policy and the United States
As the largest and one of the most influential countries in Latin America, Brazil has emerged as a leading voice for developing countries in setting regional and multilateral trade agendas. Brazil is critical of U.S. trade policies such as the Byrd Amendment (repealed, but program in effect until October 1, 2007), which directs duties from trade remedy cases to affected industries, the administration of trade remedy rules, and what it considers to be discriminatory treatment in the U.S. expansion of free trade agreements in Latin America. Despite the differences, both countries recognize the potential for important gains to be had from mutually acceptable trade liberalization at all levels. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9138/
Navy Littoral Combat Ship (LCS): Background and Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9876/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4335/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4338/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4334/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4339/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4336/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4337/
Chinese Missile and Nuclear Proliferation: Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs90/
North Korea's Nuclear Weapons: Latest Developments
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9951/
North Korea's Nuclear Weapons: Latest Developments
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9950/
U.S. Nuclear Weapons: Changes in Policy and Force Structure
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3672/
Next Steps in Nuclear Arms Control with Russia: Issues for Congress
Report that contains a review of the role of nuclear arms control in the U.S.-Soviet relationship, bilateral treaties and unilateral steps the United States took to alter its nuclear posture, and the role of arms control in the U.S.- Russian relationship. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc227855/
High-Threat Chemical Agents: Characteristics, Effects, and Policy Implications
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7709/