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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Conventional Prompt Global Strike and Long-Range Ballistic Missiles: Background and Issues
This report looks at why prompt global strike (PGS) missiles are beneficial to the U.S. and how they can help contribute to a conventional prompt global strike (CPGS) mission. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc103111/
Conventional Prompt Global Strike and Long-Range Ballistic Missiles: Background and Issues
This report looks at why prompt global strike (PGS) missiles are beneficial to the U.S., and how they can help contribute to a conventional prompt global strike (CPGS) mission. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc93847/
Conventional Prompt Global Strike and Long-Range Ballistic Missiles: Background and Issues
Prompt global strike (PGS) would allow the United States to strike targets anywhere on Earth with conventional weapons in as little as an hour. This report looks at some concerns that Congress has shown for the PGS program, including the Department of Defenses' rationale for the mission, the Air Force's ability to set up the system in a timely manner, and how the new START Treaty between the US and Russia will affect the system. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc93848/
Conventional Prompt Global Strike and Long-Range Ballistic Missiles: Background and Issues
Prompt global strike (PGS) would allow the United States to strike targets anywhere on earth with conventional weapons in as little as an hour. This report provides an overview of the rationale for the PGS mission and the possible deployment of conventional warheads on long-range ballistic missiles in support of this mission. It then reviews the Air Force and Navy efforts to develop these systems. It summarizes congressional reaction to these proposals, then provides a more detailed account of the issues raised by these concepts and programs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc40109/
Conventional Warheads For Long-Range Ballistic Missiles: Background and Issues for Congress
This report provides an overview of the Administration’s rationale for the possible deployment of conventional warheads on long-range ballistic missiles. It then reviews the Air Force and Navy efforts to develop these systems. It summarizes congressional reaction to these proposals, then provides a more detailed account of the issues raised by these concepts and programs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8683/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5667/
North Korea's Nuclear Weapons: How Soon an Arsenal?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6813/
China: Ballistic and Cruise Missiles
This CRS report contains three parts. The first part discusses ballistic missiles of the People’s Republic of China (PRC). The second discusses the PRC’s cruise missiles. The last section offers concluding observations. Two tables summarize the discussion on current ballistic and cruise missiles in service or under development. The appendix, prepared by Robert Shuey, discusses China’s reported application of global positioning system (GPS) technology to improve the accuracy of its missiles. This report focuses on the status and current developments of China’s missile programs, rather than their history. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1349/
V-22 Osprey Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2049/
V-22 Osprey Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3624/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6714/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6539/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6593/
Electric-Drive Propulsion for U.S. Navy Ships: Background and Issues for Congress
This report provides background information and discusses issues for Congress regarding the use of electric-drive propulsion technology (as opposed to traditional mechanical-drive technology) on U.S. Navy ships. As a result of technological developments over the last few years, electric-drive technology has matured to the point where the Navy has selected it for use on its planned next-generation DD-21 land-attack destroyer and is considering it for use on other kinds of Navy ships as well. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1322/
Nuclear Warhead "Pit" Production: Background and Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6097/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5694/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3646/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention's implementation. Chemical Weapons Convention implementing legislation, as S. 610, passed the Senate unanimously on May 23, 1997. This legislation, which was an amendment in the nature of a substitute reported from the Judiciary Committee, provides the statutory authority for domestic compliance with the Convention's provisions. It sets criminal and civil penalties for the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, transfer, possession, or use of chemical weapons. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3647/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention's implementation. Chemical Weapons Convention implementing legislation, as S. 610, passed the Senate unanimously on May 23, 1997. This legislation, which was an amendment in the nature of a substitute reported from the Judiciary Committee, provides the statutory authority for domestic compliance with the Convention's provisions. It sets criminal and civil penalties for the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, transfer, possession, or use of chemical weapons. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3648/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5666/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5668/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5669/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5670/
China's Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles: Current Policy Issues
This report provides a brief background analysis and recent developments regarding China’s Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles. The report includes topics such as: Recent Proliferation Transfers, chemical, nuclear, and missile technology sales to Iran, Pakistan, Libya, Syria, trade controls, nonproliferation and arms control. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2051/
North Korea's Nuclear Weapons: How Soon an Arsenal?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5705/
North Korea's Nuclear Weapons: How Soon an Arsenal?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6109/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention's implementation. Chemical Weapons Convention implementing legislation, as S. 610, passed the Senate unanimously on May 23, 1997. This legislation, which was an amendment in the nature of a substitute reported from the Judiciary Committee, provides the statutory authority for domestic compliance with the Convention's provisions. It sets criminal and civil penalties for the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, transfer, possession, or use of chemical weapons. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1353/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention's implementation. Chemical Weapons Convention implementing legislation, as S. 610, passed the Senate unanimously on May 23, 1997. This legislation, which was an amendment in the nature of a substitute reported from the Judiciary Committee, provides the statutory authority for domestic compliance with the Convention's provisions. It sets criminal and civil penalties for the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, transfer, possession, or use of chemical weapons. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2055/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention's implementation. Chemical Weapons Convention implementing legislation, as S. 610, passed the Senate unanimously on May 23, 1997. This legislation, which was an amendment in the nature of a substitute reported from the Judiciary Committee, provides the statutory authority for domestic compliance with the Convention's provisions. It sets criminal and civil penalties for the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, transfer, possession, or use of chemical weapons. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3644/
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress
The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention's implementation. Chemical Weapons Convention implementing legislation, as S. 610, passed the Senate unanimously on May 23, 1997. This legislation, which was an amendment in the nature of a substitute reported from the Judiciary Committee, provides the statutory authority for domestic compliance with the Convention's provisions. It sets criminal and civil penalties for the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, transfer, possession, or use of chemical weapons. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3645/
U.S. Arms Sales: Agreements with and Deliveries to Major Clients, 1996-2003
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6107/
Nuclear Earth Penetrator Weapons
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5702/
China's Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles: Current Policy Issues
This report provides a brief background analysis and recent developments regarding China’s Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles. The report includes topics such as: Recent Proliferation Transfers, chemical, nuclear, and missile technology sales to Iran, Pakistan, Libya, Syria, trade controls, nonproliferation and arms control. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3630/
China's Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles: Current Policy Issues
This report provides a brief background analysis and recent developments regarding China’s Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles. The report includes topics such as: Recent Proliferation Transfers, chemical, nuclear, and missile technology sales to Iran, Pakistan, Libya, Syria, trade controls, nonproliferation and arms control. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3631/
China's Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles: Current Policy Issues
This report provides a brief background analysis and recent developments regarding China’s Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles. The report includes topics such as: Recent Proliferation Transfers, chemical, nuclear, and missile technology sales to Iran, Pakistan, Libya, Syria, trade controls, nonproliferation and arms control. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3632/
Chinese Missile and Nuclear Proliferation: Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs90/
Chinese Missile and Nuclear Proliferation: Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs274/
Chinese Missile and Nuclear Proliferation: Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs275/
Chinese Missile and Nuclear Proliferation: Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs276/
China's Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles: Current Policy Issues
This report provides a brief background analysis and recent developments regarding China’s Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles. The report includes topics such as: Recent Proliferation Transfers, chemical, nuclear, and missile technology sales to Iran, Pakistan, Libya, Syria, trade controls, nonproliferation and arms control. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2052/
U.S. Nuclear Weapons: Changes in Policy and Force Structure
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3672/
U.S. Nuclear Weapons: Changes in Policy and Force Structure
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6343/
U.S. Nuclear Weapons: Changes in Policy and Force Structure
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6095/
V-22 Osprey Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6340/
Missile Survey: Ballistic and Cruise Missiles of Foreign Countries
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6093/
Antisatellites (Killer Satellites)
This issue brief discusses "killer satellites," the unofficial moniker for antisatellite (ASAT) missiles possessed by the Soviet Union in the 1970s and 1980s, as well as U.S. efforts to develop ASAT systems and simultaneously limit their development and use. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8821/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4334/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4335/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4336/
Project BioShield
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4337/