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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Results 1181 - 1190 of 1,657
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Global Markets: Evaluating Some Risks the U.S. May Face

Global Markets: Evaluating Some Risks the U.S. May Face

Date: February 5, 2003
Creator: Elwell, Craig K
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China-U.S. Trade Issues

China-U.S. Trade Issues

Date: February 4, 2003
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: U.S.-China economic ties have expanded substantially over the past several years. China is now the third largest U.S. trading partner, its second largest source of imports, and its fourth largest export market. However, U.S.-China commercial ties have been strained by a number of issues, including a surging U.S. trade deficit with China, China's refusal to float its currency, and failure to fully comply with its World Trade Organization (WTO) commitments, especially its failure to provide protection for U.S. intellectual property rights (IPR). This report explores these issues in detail, especially concerning the lack of protection for U.S. IPR.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
India and Pakistan: U.S. Economic Sanctions

India and Pakistan: U.S. Economic Sanctions

Date: February 3, 2003
Creator: Rennack, Dianne E
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Industry Trade Effects Related to NAFTA

Industry Trade Effects Related to NAFTA

Date: February 3, 2003
Creator: Villarreal, M. Angeles
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Space Launch Vehicles: Government Activities, Commercial Competition, and Satellite Exports

Space Launch Vehicles: Government Activities, Commercial Competition, and Satellite Exports

Date: February 3, 2003
Creator: Smith, Marcia S
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Budget Deficit and the Trade Deficit: What Is Their Relationship?

The Budget Deficit and the Trade Deficit: What Is Their Relationship?

Date: January 31, 2003
Creator: Labonte, Marc
Description: During the last half of the 1990s, real gross domestic investment rose as a fraction of real GDP. This resulted from the rise in U.S. productivity and the related rise in the real yield on U.S. assets. This drew additional private capital from abroad. If the twin deficits theory is correct, it has an adverse implication for the efficacy of fiscal policy as a stimulus tool. It suggests that in an environment of highly mobile international capital flows the effect of policy induced increases in the structural budget deficit (e.g., tax cuts) on short-run economic growth would be largely offset by increases in the trade deficit. The experience during both the 1980s and 1990s demonstrates that a large and growing trade deficit need not be an impediment to overall job creation even though it may have had an effect on the type of jobs that were created since it affected the composition of U.S. output.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Exempting Food and Agriculture Products from U.S. Economic Sanctions: Status and Implementation

Exempting Food and Agriculture Products from U.S. Economic Sanctions: Status and Implementation

Date: January 31, 2003
Creator: Jurenas, Remy
Description: Falling agricultural exports and declining commodity prices led farm groups and agribusiness firms to urge the 106th Congress to pass legislation exempting foods and agricultural commodities from U.S. economic sanctions against certain countries. In completing action on the FY2001 agriculture appropriations bill, Congress codified the lifting of unilateral sanctions on commercial sales of food, agricultural commodities, medicine, and medical products to Iran, Libya, North Korea, and Sudan, and extended this policy to apply to Cuba (Title IX of H.R. 5426, as enacted by P.L. 106-387; Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000). Related provisions place financing and licensing conditions on sales to these countries. Those that apply to Cuba, though, are permanent and more restrictive than for the other countries. Other provisions give Congress the authority in the future to veto a President's proposal to impose a sanction on the sale of agricultural or medical products.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties

Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties

Date: January 31, 2003
Creator: Grimmett, Jeanne J
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Export-Import Bank: Background and Legislative Issues

Export-Import Bank: Background and Legislative Issues

Date: January 30, 2003
Creator: Jackson, James K
Description: This report discusses the Export-Import Bank (Ex-In Bank), the chief U.S. government agency that helps finance American exports of manufactured goods and services with the objective of contributing to the employment of U.S. workers.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Export Tax Benefits and the WTO: Foreign Sales Corporations and the Extraterritorial Replacement Provisions

Export Tax Benefits and the WTO: Foreign Sales Corporations and the Extraterritorial Replacement Provisions

Date: January 30, 2003
Creator: Brumbaugh, David L
Description: The U.S. tax code’s Foreign Sales Corporation (FSC) provisions provided a tax benefit for U.S. exporters. However, the European Union (EU) in 1997 charged that the provision was an export subsidy and thus contravened the World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements. A WTO ruling upheld the EU complaint, and to avoid WTO sanctioned retaliatory tariffs, U.S. legislation in November 2000 replaced FSC with the “extraterritorial income” (ETI) provisions, consisting of a redesigned export tax benefit of the same magnitude as FSC. The EU maintained that the new provisions are also not WTO-compliant and asked the WTO to rule on the matter.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department