You limited your search to:

 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Results 1201 - 1250 of 1,474
  |   |  
NAFTA Labor Side Agreement: Lessons for the Workers Rights and Fast-Track Debate
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1990/
Space Launch Vehicles: Government Activities, Commercial Competition, and Satellite Exports
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1941/
Trade Promotion Authority (Fast-Track Authority for Trade Agreements): Background and Developments in the 107th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1497/
Trade Promotion Authority (Fast-Track): Labor Issues (Including H.R. 3005 and H.R. 3019)
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2016/
Technology Transfer: Use of Federally Funded Research and Development
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1973/
Trade Promotion (Fast-Track) Authority: H.R. 3005 Provisions and Related Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2018/
Trade Agreement Implementation: Expedited Procedures and Congressional Control in Existing Law
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2017/
China and the World Trade Organization
China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. In September 2001, China completed its multilateral negotiations with the WTO Working Party handling its accession application and reached a trade agreement with Mexico, the last of the original 37 WTO members that requested a bilateral trade agreement with China. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2019/
Trade Promotion Authority (Fast-Track Authority for Trade Agreements): Background and Developments in the 107th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1496/
Caribbean Basin Interim Trade Program: CBI/NAFTA Parity
The entry into force, on January 1, 1994, of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has eliminated the advantage that the beneficiaries of the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA) and related provisions of the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) had enjoyed in trade with the United States relative to Mexico, and gave Mexico an increasingly significant competitive edge over the CBERA countries. The scheduled further implementation of the NAFTA would have resulted in a substantial advantage to Mexico over the CBERA countries and vitiate in part the purpose of the CBERA. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1998/
Export-Import Bank: Background and Legislative Issues
This report discusses the Export-Import Bank (Ex-In Bank), the chief U.S. government agency that helps finance American exports of manufactured goods and services with the objective of contributing to the employment of U.S. workers. This report discusses the Bank's budget and related legislation, including the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009, signed by President Barack Obama and authorizing spending limitations for the Bank. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1995/
Trade and the Americas
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1996/
Drug Certification Requirements and Proposed Congressional Modifications in 2001
This report provides a brief summary of the existing drug certification requirements for drug producing and drug-transit countries, background on the experience, criticisms, and reform efforts under these provisions; a summary of early congressional options and proposals advanced in 2001, with possible advantages and disadvantages; a summary of later initiatives with legislative activity; and (5) a tracking of legislative action on the major initiatives. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1606/
Taiwan: Major U.S. Arms Sales Since 1990
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2061/
Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), Free Trade, and the 2001 Summit in Shanghai
On October 20-21, 2001, the Ninth APEC Leaders’ Meeting (summit) was hosted by China in Shanghai. The office theme for APEC 2001 was “Meeting New Challenges in the New Century: Achieving Common Prosperity through Participation and Cooperation” with the sub-themes of: (1) sharing the benefits of globalization and the new economy, (2) advancing trade and investment, and (3) promoting sustained economic growth. For the United States, APEC raises fundamental questions that are of special interest to Congress. One is whether consensus can be achieved on the APEC vision of free trade and investment in the Asia Pacific or whether future trade liberalization will be confined primarily to bilateral free-trade agreements or multilateral trade negotiations under the World Trade Organization. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2015/
India and Pakistan: Current U.S. Economic Sanctions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1843/
Agriculture and Fast Track or Trade Promotion Authority
New “fast track” (or, trade promotion) authority (TPA) is at issue in the 107th Congress. Such authority could enable the Administration to submit negotiated foreign trade agreements to Congress for consideration under expedited procedures. Efforts to renew this authority, which expired in 1994, have not succeeded since then. Many agricultural and food industry interests are among the export-oriented enterprises that support TPA, arguing that foreign trading partners will not seriously negotiate with an Administration that lacks it. However, some farm groups argue that fast track ultimately will lead to new agreements that could have adverse effects on U.S. producers, at least in some commodity sectors. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1468/
NAFTA Labor Side Agreement: Lessons for the Workers Rights and Fast-Track Debate
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1989/
Nuclear Sanctions: Section 102(b) of the Arms Export Control Act and Its Application to India and Pakistan
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1833/
Taiwan and the World Trade Organization
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2023/
Space Launch Vehicles: Government Activities, Commercial Competition, and Satellite Exports
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1940/
Vietnam Trade Agreement: Approval and Implementing Procedure
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2027/
China: Possible Missile Technology Transfers from U.S. Satellite Export Policy - Actions and Chronology
This CRS Report discusses security concerns, significant congressional and administration action, and a comprehensive chronology pertaining to satellite exports to the PRC. The report discusses issues for U.S. foreign and security policy (including that on China and weapons nonproliferation), such as: What are the benefits and costs of satellite exports to China for U.S. economic and security interests? Should the United States continue, change, or cease the policy in place since the Reagan Administration that has allowed exports of satellites to China (for its launch and – increasingly – for its use)? Etc. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1971/
Export Administration Act of 1979 Reauthorization
The Export Administration Act of 2001 was introduced on January 23, 2001. Hearings were held by the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee, and the bill was reported for consideration by the full Senate by a vote of 19-1 to March 22, 2001. A companion version in the House, H.R. 2581, was introduced by Rep. Gilmanon July 20, 2001. The House International Relations Committee reported the measure with 35 amendments on August 1. The Export Administration Act of 1979 expired on August 20, 2001, however the President extended export control authority and the Export Administration Regulations by invoking the International Emergency Economic Powers Act. During the 106th Congress, both houses held hearings on export control legislation and the Senate Banking Committee voted to adopt the Export Administration Act of 1999 (S. 1712, reported on October 8, 1999, S.Rept. 106-180). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1999/
Prescription Drugs: Importation for Personal Use
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1522/
Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 1993-2000
This report is prepared annually to provide unclassified quantitative data on conventional arms transfers to developing nations by the United States and foreign countries for the preceding eight calendar years. Some general data are provided on worldwide conventional arms transfers, but the principal focus is the level of arms transfers by major weapons suppliers to nations in the developing world. The data in the report illustrate how global patterns of conventional arms transfers have changed in the post-Cold War and post-Persian Gulf War years. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2064/
Export Tax Benefits and the WTO: Foreign Sales Corporations (FSCs) and the Extraterritorial (ETI) Replacement Provisions
The U.S. tax code’s Foreign Sales Corporation (FSC) provisions provided a tax benefit for U.S. exporters. However, the European Union (EU) in 1997 charged that the provision was an export subsidy and thus contravened the World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements. A WTO ruling upheld the EU complaint, and to avoid WTO sanctioned retaliatory tariffs, U.S. legislation in November 2000 replaced FSC with the “extraterritorial income” (ETI) provisions, consisting of a redesigned export tax benefit of the same magnitude as FSC. The EU maintained that the new provisions are also not WTO-compliant and asked the WTO to rule on the matter. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2028/
Most-Favored-Nation Status of the People's Republic of China
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2001/
Farm Support Programs and World Trade Commitments
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1379/
The Iran-Libya Sanctions Act (ILSA)
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1840/
Voting on NTR for China Again in 2001, and Past Congressional Decisions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2025/
U.S.-Sub-Saharan Africa Trade and Investment: Programs and Policy Direction
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1798/
Export-Import Bank: Background and Legislative Issues
This report discusses the Export-Import Bank (Ex-In Bank), the chief U.S. government agency that helps finance American exports of manufactured goods and services with the objective of contributing to the employment of U.S. workers. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1994/
Most-Favored-Nation Status of the People's Republic of China
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2000/
Taiwan: Annual Arms Sales Process
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2063/
Agricultural Export and Food Aid Programs
This report discusses projected agricultural imports and exports for FY2001, as well as legislation that deals with federal programs in support of agricultural exports and federal aid dedicated to farms and agricultural reform. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1375/
Agricultural Trade Issues in the 107th Congress
The 107th Congress will consider and seek to influence trade issues with implications for the U.S. agricultural sector. Trade in agricultural commodities and food products affects farm income and rural employment, and it also generates economic activity beyond the farm gate. With agricultural export sales accounting for one-quarter of farm income, policymakers view U.S. efforts to develop market opportunities overseas as vital to the sector's financial health. Decisions taken by the Bush Administration, and actions taken by Congress, thus will affect the outlook for agricultural trade. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1370/
Space Launch Vehicles: Government Activities, Commercial Competition, and Satellite Exports
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1939/
A Free Trade Area of the Americas: Status of Negotiations and Major Policy Issues
At the second Summit of the Americas in Santiago, Chile (April 1998), 34 Western Hemisphere nations agreed to initiate formal negotiations to create a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) by 2005. The negotiating groups completed a draft agreement in January 2001, which was presented at the third Summit of the Americas held in Quebec City on April 20-22, 2001. President Bush expressed strong support for the FTAA and concrete progress has been made in moving it forward. Yet, differences in priorities among the countries are becoming increasingly evident, suggesting that the FTAA faces many policy hurdles in both the U.S. Congress and the hemisphere. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2029/
Fast-Track Authority for Trade Agreements (Trade Promotion Authority): Background and Developments in the 107th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1494/
Dispute Settlement in the Proposed U.S.-South Korea Free Trade Agreement (KORUS FTA)
The proposed U.S.-South Korea Free Trade Agreement (KORUS FTA) follows current U.S. free trade agreement (FTA) practice in containing two types of formal dispute settlement: (1) State- State, applicable to disputes between the KORUS FTA Parties, and (2) investor-State, applicable to claims by an investor of one KORUS FTA Party against the other Party for breach of an agreement investment obligation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc40138/
Voting on NTR for China Again in 2001, and Past Congressional Decisions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2024/
America's Growing Current Account Deficit: Its Cause and What It Means for the Economy
This report discusses the reasons for the U.S. current account deficit, popularly known as the trade deficit, and which is on the rise. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2008/
Trade Remedy Law Reform in the 107th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2006/
Exempting Food and Agriculture Products from U.S. Economic Sanctions: Status and Implementation
Falling agricultural exports and declining commodity prices led farm groups and agribusiness firms to urge the 106th Congress to pass legislation exempting foods and agricultural commodities from U.S. economic sanctions against certain countries. In completing action on the FY2001 agriculture appropriations bill, Congress codified the lifting of unilateral sanctions on commercial sales of food, agricultural commodities, medicine, and medical products to Iran, Libya, North Korea, and Sudan, and extended this policy to apply to Cuba (Title IX of H.R. 5426, as enacted by P.L. 106-387; Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000). Related provisions place financing and licensing conditions on sales to these countries. Those that apply to Cuba, though, are permanent and more restrictive than for the other countries. Other provisions give Congress the authority in the future to veto a President's proposal to impose a sanction on the sale of agricultural or medical products. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1836/
Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1991/
Agriculture and Fast Track Trade Legislation
The 107th Congress is expected to consider new "fast track" (or, Presidential trade promotion) authority, which could enable the Administration to submit trade agreements negotiated with foreign countries to Congress for consideration under expedited procedures. Many agricultural and food industry interests are among the export-oriented enterprises that support fast track authority, arguing that foreign trading partners will not seriously negotiate with an Administration that lacks it. However, some agricultural groups argue that fast track ultimately will lead to new agreements that deliver more benefits to foreign than to U.S. producers, at least in some commodity sectors. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1469/
The Export Administration Act: Controversy and Prospects
In the 107th Congress, renewed efforts are underway to enact a permanent replacement for the Export Administration Act of 1979 (EAA), temporarily reauthorized in the 106th Congress until August 20, 2001. The Export Administration Act of 2001 (S. 149) was introduced on January 23, 2001. Hearings were held by the Senate Banking Committee, and the bill was reported for consideration by the full Senate by a vote of 19-1 to March 22, 2001. The difficulty in passing a comprehensive rewrite of the EAA has resulted, in part, from the continuing tension between national security and commercial concerns. Industry groups, proponents of heightened export controls, the Administration, and Congress have all participated in the reauthorization debate. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2012/
Textile and Apparel Trade Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2022/
U.S. Merchandise Trade Statistics: 1948-2000
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1993/