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 Country: China
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
APEC and Free Trade in the Asia Pacific

APEC and Free Trade in the Asia Pacific

Date: November 14, 1995
Creator: Nanto, Dick K.
Description: This report discusses the summit held by President Bill Clinton and other leaders of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) on November 19, 1995. The report discusses the primary reason for the summit, an Action Agenda intended to lead to free and open trade and investment among its members. The report also discusses how APEC countries were divided on certain issues going into this summit.
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Taiwan's Accession to the WTO and Its Economic Relations with the United States and China

Taiwan's Accession to the WTO and Its Economic Relations with the United States and China

Date: November 4, 2005
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China's Accession to the World Trade Organization: Legal Issues

China's Accession to the World Trade Organization: Legal Issues

Date: June 2, 2000
Creator: Grimmett, Jeanne J
Description: The People's Republic of China (PRC) applied to resume membership in the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) in 1986 and continues to negotiate its accession to GATT's successor, the World Trade Organization (WTO). A country may join the WTO on terms agreed by the applicant and WTO Members if two-thirds of Members approve the country's accession agreement. A Member may "opt out" of WTO relations with another country by invoking Article XIII of the WTO Agreement, its "non-application" clause. The United States and the PRC agreed to bilateral terms for the PRC's accession in November 1999.
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China and the World Trade Organization

China and the World Trade Organization

Date: August 6, 2003
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001. On December 11, 2001, China officially became a WTO member. WTO membership will require China to significantly liberalize its trade and investment regimes, which could produce significant new commercial opportunities for U.S. businesses. A main concern for Congress is to ensure that China fully complies with its WTO commitments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the World Trade Organization

China and the World Trade Organization

Date: February 20, 2003
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001. On December 11, 2001, China officially became a WTO member. WTO membership will require China to significantly liberalize its trade and investment regimes, which could produce significant new commercial opportunities for U.S. businesses. A main concern for Congress is to ensure that China fully complies with its WTO commitments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the World Trade Organization

China and the World Trade Organization

Date: April 2, 2002
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001. On December 11, 2001, China officially became a WTO member. WTO membership will require China to significantly liberalize its trade and investment regimes, which could produce significant new commercial opportunities for U.S. businesses. A main concern for Congress is to ensure that China fully complies with its WTO commitments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the World Trade Organization

China and the World Trade Organization

Date: January 17, 2002
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001. On December 11, 2001, China officially became a WTO member. WTO membership will require China to significantly liberalize its trade and investment regimes, which could produce significant new commercial opportunities for U.S. businesses. A main concern for Congress is to ensure that China fully complies with its WTO commitments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the World Trade Organization

China and the World Trade Organization

Date: November 19, 2001
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. In September 2001, China completed its multilateral negotiations with the WTO Working Party handling its accession application and reached a trade agreement with Mexico, the last of the original 37 WTO members that requested a bilateral trade agreement with China. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001.
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Taiwan's Accession to the WTO and its Economic Relations with the United States and China

Taiwan's Accession to the WTO and its Economic Relations with the United States and China

Date: May 16, 2003
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China's Currency: Economic Issues and Options for U.S. Trade Policy

China's Currency: Economic Issues and Options for U.S. Trade Policy

Date: April 18, 2006
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M & Labonte, Marc
Description: When the U.S. runs a trade deficit with the Chinese, this requires a capital inflow from China to the United States. This, in turn, lowers U.S. interest rates and increases U.S. investment spending. On the negative side, lower priced goods from China may hurt U.S. industries that compete with those products, reducing their production and employment. In addition, an undervalued yuan makes U.S. exports to China more expensive, thus reducing the level of U.S. exports to China and job opportunities for U.S. workers in those sectors. However, in the long run, trade can affect only the composition of employment, not its overall level. Thus, inducing China to appreciate its currency would likely benefit some U.S. economic sectors, but would harm others, including U.S. consumers. Several estimates of the yuan’s undervaluation are evaluated in the report.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department